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Book
xiv, 232 pages : illustrations, maps ; 22 cm.
  • List of Illustrations viii Series Editor s Preface ix Acknowledgments xi Timeline xii Introduction 1 Talking about Freedom 2 Scholars Weigh In 3 Why Revolution? 5 Comparing Capitalism and Socialism 8 Latin American Attitudes 12 1 Cuba through 1959 15 Colonial History 15 The Colony in the Republic 20 Revolution: A War, or a Process? 28 2 Experiments with Socialism 36 Analyzing the Situation: Economic Backwardness 37 The 1960s: Experimentation and the Great Debate 40 The 1970s: Institutionalization and the Soviet Model 45 Cuba in the 1970s: How it Worked 46 1986: Rectification 51 How Democratic was Cuban Socialism? 51 3 Relations with the United States 54 The United States and Cuba 55 In their Own Words: U.S. Policymakers Respond to Revolution 57 Covert War: Up to the Bay of Pigs 63 Covert War: After the Bay of Pigs 65 The Missile Crisis 68 After the Missile Crisis 70 The War Continues 72 4 Emigration and Internationalism 75 Miami 78 Beyond Miami 80 Cuba s Global Reach: Beyond the Cold War 81 Cuba and Black Internationalism 82 Cuba in Africa and Latin America 84 Civilian Aid Missions 86 5 Art, Culture, and Revolution 88 Literature 89 Film 94 Music 98 Sport 100 Dance 102 Food 103 Political Culture and Cultural Politics 105 6 Cuba Diversa 110 Race 110 Gender 116 Sexuality 119 Religion 123 7 The Special Period : Socialism on One Island 126 1993 95: Rapid ]Fire Reforms 126 Social Impact of the Market Reforms 130 Limits to Capitalism 132 Charting New Territory 134 Contradictions: Inequality and Jineterismo 135 Opting to Leave: The 1994 Exodus 138 Debate and its Limits during the 1990s 141 Debating Democracy 142 Limits to Debate 146 8 Cuba into the Twenty ]First Century 149 From Perfeccionamiento to Recentralization 150 Disillusionment 153 Cuba after Fidel: A New Era? 155 Civil Society into the New Century 159 U.S. Policy: The Bush Era 163 Cuba, Venezuela, and the ALBA 164 Barack Obama and Raul Castro: A New Relationship? 166 Analyzing the Changes 168 Conclusion 171 Glossary 174 Notes 177 Bibliography 198 Index 214.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781118942284 20160618
A fully-revised and updated new edition of a concise and insightful socio-historical analysis of the Cuban revolution, and the course it took over five and a half decades. * Now available in a fully-revised second edition, including new material to add to the book s coverage of Cuba over the past decade under Raul Castro * All of the existing chapters have been updated to reflect recent scholarship * Balances social and historical insight into the revolution with economic and political analysis extending into the twenty-first century * Juxtaposes U.S. and Cuban perspectives on the historical impact of the revolution, engaging and debunking the myths and preconceptions surrounding one of the most formative political events of the twentieth century * Incorporates more student-friendly features such as a timeline and glossary.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781118942284 20160618
Green Library
HISTORY-178-01, HISTORY 78-01
Book
xxii, 311 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
" An illuminating study of an important actor in a decisive moment of Chilean history, and a valuable and original contribution to Latin American history and politics and women's studies, which both presents new information and explores significant theoretical issues." -Peter Winn, Tufts University When over five thousand women took to the streets of Santiago to protest Salvador Allende's Popular Unity government on December 1, 1971, their March of the Empty Pots and Pans signaled the beginning of a mass opposition movement and prompted the later formation of Feminine Power, a multi-class organization that played a critical role in paving the way for the military coup in 1973. Drawing on extensive interviews with leaders and participants, Margaret Power tells the story of these right-wing women, examining their motives, the tactics they employed, and the impact of their ideas and activity on Chilean society and politics. The ability of the right to exploit established ideas about gender, Power argues, was key to the opposition's success, and she explores how conservatives appealed to women as wives and mothers to mobilize them.Power also pays attention to the earlier history of these efforts, including the formation of Women's Action of Chile in 1963, and to the support provided by the U. S. government. The epilogue examines right-wing women's reactions to the arrest of Augusto Pinochet in 1998 and their role in the elections of 2000. By focusing on the women who opposed Allende and supported Pinochet, this book offers a fresh look at the complex dynamics of Chilean politics in the last half of the twentieth century.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780271021959 20160528
This is the story of the formation of Feminine Power, an organization formed in the wake of a five thousand strong female protest against Allende's popular unity government in 1971. It looks at these right-wing women, their motives and tactics and their impact on Chilean politics.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780271021744 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-178-01, HISTORY 78-01
Book
255 p. ; 22 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-178-01, HISTORY 78-01