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Book
xvii, 198 pages : illustration ; 23 cm.
  • INTRODUCTION -- PART ONE: STUDENTS -- PART TWO: COSTS, DEBT, AND SPENDING -- PART THREE: LEADERSHIP PRESSURES, FROM WITHIN AND WITHOUT -- PART FOUR: WHAT'S AHEAD -- PART FIVE: CONCLUSIONS.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199374090 20161213
American higher education is at a crossroads. Technological innovations and disruptive market forces are buffeting colleges and universities at the very time their financial structure grows increasingly fragile. Disinvestment by states has driven up tuition prices at public colleges, and student debt has reached a startling record-high of one trillion dollars. Cost-minded students and their families-and the public at large-are questioning the worth of a college education, even as study after study shows how important it is to economic and social mobility. And as elite institutions trim financial aid and change other business practices in search of more sustainable business models, racial and economic stratification in American higher education is only growing. In American Higher Education in Crisis?: What Everyone Needs to Know, Goldie Blumenstyk, who has been reporting on higher education trends for 25 years, guides readers through the forces and trends that have brought the education system to this point, and highlights some of the ways they will reshape America's colleges in the years to come. Blumenstyk hones in on debates over the value of post-secondary education, problems of affordability, and concerns about the growing economic divide. Fewer and fewer people can afford the constantly increasing tuition price of college, Blumenstyk shows, and yet college graduates in the United States now earn on average twice as much as those with only a high-school education. She also discusses faculty tenure and growing administrative bureaucracies on campuses; considers new demands for accountability such as those reflected in the U.S. Department of Education's College Scorecard; and questions how the money chase in big-time college athletics, revelations about colleges falsifying rankings data, and corporate-style presidential salaries have soured public perception. Higher education is facing a serious set of challenges, but solutions have also begun to emerge. Blumenstyk highlights how institutions are responding to the rise of alternative-educational opportunities and the new academic and business models that are appearing, and considers how the Obama administration and public organizations are working to address questions of affordability, diversity, and academic integrity. She addresses some of the advances in technology colleges are employing to attract and retain students; outlines emerging competency-based programs that are reshaping conceptions of a college degree, and offers readers a look at promising innovations that could alter the higher education landscape in the near future. An extremely timely and focused look at this embattled and evolving arena, this primer emphasizes how open-ended the conversation about higher education's future remains, and illuminates how big the stakes are for students, colleges, and the nation.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199374090 20161213
Education Library (Cubberley), Stanford Libraries
GSBGEN-345-01
Book
xvii, 198 pages : illustration ; 23 cm.
  • INTRODUCTION -- PART ONE: STUDENTS -- PART TWO: COSTS, DEBT, AND SPENDING -- PART THREE: LEADERSHIP PRESSURES, FROM WITHIN AND WITHOUT -- PART FOUR: WHAT'S AHEAD -- PART FIVE: CONCLUSIONS.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199374090 20161213
American higher education is at a crossroads. Technological innovations and disruptive market forces are buffeting colleges and universities at the very time their financial structure grows increasingly fragile. Disinvestment by states has driven up tuition prices at public colleges, and student debt has reached a startling record-high of one trillion dollars. Cost-minded students and their families-and the public at large-are questioning the worth of a college education, even as study after study shows how important it is to economic and social mobility. And as elite institutions trim financial aid and change other business practices in search of more sustainable business models, racial and economic stratification in American higher education is only growing. In American Higher Education in Crisis?: What Everyone Needs to Know, Goldie Blumenstyk, who has been reporting on higher education trends for 25 years, guides readers through the forces and trends that have brought the education system to this point, and highlights some of the ways they will reshape America's colleges in the years to come. Blumenstyk hones in on debates over the value of post-secondary education, problems of affordability, and concerns about the growing economic divide. Fewer and fewer people can afford the constantly increasing tuition price of college, Blumenstyk shows, and yet college graduates in the United States now earn on average twice as much as those with only a high-school education. She also discusses faculty tenure and growing administrative bureaucracies on campuses; considers new demands for accountability such as those reflected in the U.S. Department of Education's College Scorecard; and questions how the money chase in big-time college athletics, revelations about colleges falsifying rankings data, and corporate-style presidential salaries have soured public perception. Higher education is facing a serious set of challenges, but solutions have also begun to emerge. Blumenstyk highlights how institutions are responding to the rise of alternative-educational opportunities and the new academic and business models that are appearing, and considers how the Obama administration and public organizations are working to address questions of affordability, diversity, and academic integrity. She addresses some of the advances in technology colleges are employing to attract and retain students; outlines emerging competency-based programs that are reshaping conceptions of a college degree, and offers readers a look at promising innovations that could alter the higher education landscape in the near future. An extremely timely and focused look at this embattled and evolving arena, this primer emphasizes how open-ended the conversation about higher education's future remains, and illuminates how big the stakes are for students, colleges, and the nation.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199374090 20161213
Business Library
GSBGEN-345-01
Book
xii, 238 pages ; 25 cm
"For nearly two decades, pundits have been predicting the demise of higher education in the United States. Our colleges and universities will soon find themselves competing for students with universities from around the world. With the advent of massive open online courses ("MOOCS") over the past two years, predictions that higher education will be the next industry to undergo "disruption" have become more frequent and fervent. Currently a university's reputation relies heavily on the "four Rs" in which the most elite schools thrive--rankings, research, real estate, and rah! (i.e. sports). But for the majority of students who are not attending these elite institutions, the "four Rs" offer poor value for the expense of a college education. Craig sees the future of higher education in online degrees that unbundle course offerings to offer a true bottom line return for the majority of students in terms of graduation, employment, and wages. College Disrupted details the changes that American higher education will undergo, including the transformation from packaged courses and degrees to truly unbundled course offerings, along with those that it will not. Written by a professional at the only investment firm focused on the higher education market, College Disrupted takes a creative view of the forces roiling higher education and the likely outcome, including light-hearted, real-life anecdotes that illustrate the author's points."-- Provided by publisher.
Business Library
GSBGEN-345-01
Book
1 online resource (336 pages) : illustrations.
  • Introduction : the changing ecology of U.S. higher education / Mitchell L. Stevens
  • Higher education in America : multiple field perspectives / W. Richard Scott
  • DIY U : higher education goes hybrid / Anya Kamenetz
  • Boom, regulate, cleanse, repeat : for-profit colleges' slow but inevitable drive toward acceptability / Paul Fain & Doug Lederman
  • The classification of organizational forms : theory and application to the field of higher education / Martin Ruef & Manish Nag
  • The new landscape of early adulthood : implications for broad-access higher education / Richard A. Settersten, Jr
  • The "traditional" college student : a smaller and smaller minority and its implications for diversity and access institutions / Regina Deil-Amen
  • Measuring college performance / Richard Arum & Josipa Roksa
  • Explaining policy change in K-12 and higher education / William R. Doyle & Michael W. Kirst
  • Understanding human resources in broad-access higher education / Susanna Loeb, Agustina Paglayan, & Eric Taylor
  • Improving collegiate outcomes at broad-access institutions : lessons for research and practice / Michal Kurlaender, Jessica S. Howell, & Jacob Jackson
  • A research framework for U.S. higher education / Daniel Klasik, Kristopher Proctor, & Rachel Baker.
Between 1945 and 1990 the United States built the largest and most productive higher education system in world history. Over the last two decades, however, dramatic budget cuts to public academic services and skyrocketing tuition have made college completion more difficult for many. Nevertheless, the democratic promise of education and the global competition for educated workers mean ever growing demand. Remaking College considers this changing context, arguing that a growing accountability revolution, the push for greater efficiency and productivity, and the explosion of online learning are changing the character of higher education.Writing from a range of disciplines and professional backgrounds, the contributors each bring a unique perspective to the fate and future of U.S. higher education. By directing their focus to schools doing the lion's share of undergraduate instruction-community colleges, comprehensive public universities, and for-profit institutions-they imagine a future unencumbered by dominant notions of "traditional" students, linear models of achievement, and college as a four-year residential experience. The result is a collection rich with new tools for helping people make more informed decisions about college-for themselves, for their children, and for American society as a whole.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804793292 20161213
Business Library
GSBGEN-345-01
Book
x, 323 pages ; 24 cm
  • Introduction : the changing ecology of US higher education / Mitchell L. Stevens
  • Higher education in America : multiple field perspectives / W. Richard Scott
  • DIY U : higher education goes hybrid / Anya Kamenetz
  • Boom, regulate, cleanse, repeat : for-profit colleges : slow but inevitable drive toward acceptability / Paul Fain & Doug Lederman
  • The classification of organizational forms : theory and application to the field of higher education / Martin Ruef & Manish Nag
  • The radically altered landscape of early adulthood : implications for broad-access higher education / Richard A. Settersten, Jr
  • The "traditional" college student : a smaller and smaller minority and its implications for diversity and access institutions / Regina Deil-Amen
  • Measuring college performance / Richard Arum & Josipa Roksa
  • Explaining policy change in K-12 and higher education / William R. Doyle & Michael W. Kirst
  • Understanding human resources in broad-access higher education / Susanna Loeb, Agustina Paglayan, & Eric Taylor
  • Improving collegiate outcomes at broad-access institutions : lessons for research and practice / Michal Kurlaender, Jessica S. Howell, & Jacob Jackson
  • A research framework for US higher education / Daniel Klasik, Kristopher Proctor, & Rachel Baker.
Between 1945 and 1990 the United States built the largest and most productive higher education system in world history. Over the last two decades, however, dramatic budget cuts to public academic services and skyrocketing tuition have made college completion more difficult for many. Nevertheless, the democratic promise of education and the global competition for educated workers mean ever growing demand. Remaking College considers this changing context, arguing that a growing accountability revolution, the push for greater efficiency and productivity, and the explosion of online learning are changing the character of higher education.Writing from a range of disciplines and professional backgrounds, the contributors each bring a unique perspective to the fate and future of U.S. higher education. By directing their focus to schools doing the lion's share of undergraduate instruction-community colleges, comprehensive public universities, and for-profit institutions-they imagine a future unencumbered by dominant notions of "traditional" students, linear models of achievement, and college as a four-year residential experience. The result is a collection rich with new tools for helping people make more informed decisions about college-for themselves, for their children, and for American society as a whole.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804793292 20161213
Business Library
GSBGEN-345-01
Book
xxi, 389 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Acknowledgments vii Preface xiii Chapter 1. Educational Attainment: Overall Trends, Disparities, and the Public Universities We Study 1 Chapter 2. Bachelor's Degree Attainment on a National Level 20 Chapter 3. Finishing College at Public Universities 32 Chapter 4. Fields of Study, Time-to-Degree, and College Grades 57 Chapter 5. High Schools and "Undermatching" 87 Chapter 6. Test Scores and High School Grades as Predictors 112 Chapter 7. Transfer Students and the Path from Two-Year to Four-Year Colleges 134 Chapter 8. Financial Aid and Pricing on a National Level 149 Chapter 9. Financial Aid at Public Universities 166 Chapter 10. Institutional Selectivity and Institutional Effects 192 Chapter 11. Target Populations 207 Chapter 12. Looking Ahead 223 Appendix A. The Modern Evolution of America's Flagship Universities by Eugene M. Tobin 239 Notes 265 List of Figures 337 List of Tables 347 List of Appendix Tables 349 References 357 Index 377.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691137483 20171218
The United States has long been a model for accessible, affordable education, as exemplified by the country's public universities. And yet less than 60 percent of the students entering American universities today are graduating. Why is this happening, and what can be done? "Crossing the Finish Line" provides the most detailed exploration ever of college completion at America's public universities. This groundbreaking book sheds light on such serious issues as dropout rates linked to race, gender, and socioeconomic status. Probing graduation rates at twenty-one flagship public universities and four statewide systems of public higher education, the authors focus on the progress of students in the entering class of 1999 - from entry to graduation, transfer, or withdrawal. They examine the effects of parental education, family income, race and gender, high school grades, test scores, financial aid, and characteristics of universities attended (especially their selectivity). The conclusions are compelling: minority students and students from poor families have markedly lower graduation rates - and take longer to earn degrees - even when other variables are taken into account. Noting the strong performance of transfer students and the effects of financial constraints on student retention, the authors call for improved transfer and financial aid policies, and suggest ways of improving the sorting processes that match students to institutions. An outstanding combination of evidence and analysis, "Crossing the Finish Line" should be read by everyone who cares about the nation's higher education system.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691137483 20171218
Business Library
GSBGEN-345-01