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Book
ix, 539 p. : col. ill., maps ; 29 cm.
  • PREFACE. PART I - INTRODUCTION. 1. Eruptions, Jargon, and History. A "Grey Volcano" in Eruption - Galunggung - 1982. A "Red Volcano" in Eruption - Kilauea - 1974. Some Basic Terminology. History of Volcanology. Further Reading. Questions for Thought, Study, and Discussion. PART II - THE BIG PICTURE. 2. Global Perspectives - Plate Tectonics and Volcanism. Birth of a Theory. Volcanoes along Divergent Plate Boundaries. Volcanoes along Convergent Plate Boundaries. Intraplate Volcanoes. Further Reading. Questions for Thought, Study, and Discussion. 3. The Nature of Magma - Where Volcanoes Come From. Origins of Magma. The Physics and Chemistry of Melting. Classification of Magma and Igneous Rocks. Principal Magma Types. Magmatic and Volcanic Gases. Further Reading. Questions for Thought, Study, and Discussion. 4. The Physical Properties of Magma and Why it Erupts. Magma Temperatures. Magma Rheology. Magma Ascent and Emplacement. "Frozen Magma" - Subvolcanic Intrusives. Triggers for Volcanic Eruptions - Why Volcanoes Erupt. Repose Intervals. Further Reading. Questions for Thought, Study, and Discussion. PART III - VOLCANIC ERUPTIONS AND THEIR PRODUCTS. 5. Classifying Volcanic Eruptions. Lacroix Classification System. Rittman Diagrams. Geze Classification Diagram. Walker Classification System. Volcanic Explosivity Index (VEI). Further Reading. Questions for Thought, Study, and Discussion. 6. Effusive Volcanic Eruptions and Their Products. Mafic and Intermediate Effusive Eruptions. P a hoehoe and 0 A 0a. Pyroducts. P a hoehoe Surface Structures. Lava Flow Internal Structures. 0 A 0a Surface Structures. Block Lavas. Radiocarbon Dating of Prehistoric Lava Flows. Further Reading. Questions for Thought, Study, and Discussion. 7. An Overview of Explosive Eruptions and Their Products. Ejecta Classification. Explosive Eruption Styles and Their Products. Pyroclastic Density Currents (PDCs). Further Reading. Questions for Thought, Study, and Discussion. 8. A Closer Look at Large-scale Explosive Eruptions. Measuring the Sizes of Plinian Eruptions. Plinian Eruption Dynamics. Pyroclastic Density Currents (PDCs). Directed Blasts. "Super-Eruptions". Further Reading. Questions for Thought, Study, and Discussion. PART IV - VOLCANIC LANDFORMS AND SETTINGS. 9. Constructional ("Positive") Volcanic Landforms. Large Igneous Provinces. Shield Volcanoes. Composite Volcanoes. Minor Volcanic Landforms. Volcano Old Age and Extinction. Further Reading. Questions for Thought, Study, and Discussion. 10. "Negative" Volcanic Landforms - Craters and Calderas. Small Craters. Calderas. Post-caldera Resurgence. Caldera Formation Mechanisms. Caldera Roots - Relationships to Plutonic Rocks. Volcano-tectonic Depressions. Further Reading. Questions for Thought, Study, and Discussion. 11. Mass-wasting Processes and Products. Landslides, Avalanches, and Sector Collapses. Lahars. Causes of Lahars. Lahar Dynamics. Lahar Destructiveness. Further Reading. Questions for Thought, Study, and Discussion. 12. Volcanoes Unseen and Far Away. Submarine and Subglacial Volcanoes - The Meeting of Fire, Water, and Ice. Extraterrestrial Volcanoes. Further Reading. Questions for Thought, Study, and Discussion. PART V - HUMANISTIC VOLCANOLOGY. 13. Volcanoes: Life, Climate, and Human History. Volcanoes and the Origin of Life. Volcanoes, Atmosphere, and Climate. Volcanic Influence on Soil Fertility and Agriculture. Volcanoes and Human History. Social Impact of Volcanic Eruptions. Further Reading. Questions for Thought, Study, and Discussion. 14. Volcanic Hazards and Risk - Monitoring and Mitigation. Hazards and Risk. Active, Dormant, and Extinct Volcanoes. Volcanic Hazards. Volcanic Risk. Volcano Monitoring. Volcanic Crisis Management. Further Reading. Questions for Thought, Study, and Discussion. 15. Economic Volcanology. Earth Energy Relationships. Volcano Energy. Stored Energy: Geothermal Power. Volcanoes and Ore Deposits. Other Useful Volcanic Materials. Further Reading. Questions for Thought, Study, and Discussion. Epilogue: The Future of Volcanology. References. Index. Appendix: List of Prominent World Volcanoes. Map: Prominent World Volcanoes.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781405162494 20160606
Volcanoes are essential elements in the delicate global balance of elemental forces that govern both the dynamic evolution of the Earth and the nature of Life itself. Without volcanic activity, life as we know it would not exist on our planet. Although beautiful to behold, volcanoes are also potentially destructive, and understanding their nature is critical to prevent major loss of life in the future. Richly illustrated with over 300 original color photographs and diagrams the book is written in an informal manner, with minimum use of jargon, and relies heavily on first-person, eye-witness accounts of eruptive activity at both "red" (effusive) and "grey" (explosive) volcanoes to illustrate the full spectrum of volcanic processes and their products. Decades of teaching in university classrooms and fieldwork on active volcanoes throughout the world have provided the authors with unique experiences that they have distilled into a highly readable textbook of lasting value. Questions for Thought, Study, and Discussion, Suggestions for Further Reading, and a comprehensive list of source references make this work a major resource for further study of volcanology. Volcanoes maintains three core foci:*Global perspectives explain volcanoes in terms of their tectonic positions on Earth and their roles in earth history*Environmental perspectives describe the essential role of volcanism in the moderation of terrestrial climate and atmosphere*Humanitarian perspectives discuss the major influences of volcanoes on human societies. This latter is especially important as resource scarcities and environmental issues loom over our world, and as increasing numbers of people are threatened by volcanic hazards Readership Volcanologists, advanced undergraduate, and graduate students in earth science and related degree courses, and volcano enthusiasts worldwide. A companion website is also available for this title at www.wiley.com/go/lockwood/volcanoes.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781405162494 20160606
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
GES-185
Book
xiv, 471 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
  • List of contributors-- Preface-- Acknowledgements-- 1. Understanding the physical behaviour of volcanoes Steven N. Carey-- 2. Volcano hazards Robert I.Tilling-- 3. Anticipating volcanic eruptions Joan Marti and Arnau Folch-- 4. Volcanoes and the geological cycle Ray A. F. Cas-- 5. Effects of volcanic eruptions on the atmosphere and climate Stephen Self-- 6. Volcanoes, hydrothermal venting and the origin of life Karl O. Stetter-- 7. Volcanism and mass extinctions Paul B. Wignall-- 8. Effects of modern volcanic eruptions on vegetation Virginia H. Dale, Johanna Delgado-Acevedo and James MacMahon-- 9. Animals and volcanoes: survival and revival John S. Edwards-- 10. Human impacts of volcanoes Peter J. Baxter-- 11. Volcanoes, geothermal energy and the environment Wendell A. Duffield-- 12. Volcanic-hosted ore deposits Harold L. Gibson-- 13. Industrial uses of volcanic materials Grant Heiken-- 14. Volcanoes, society and culture David K. Chester-- 15. Volcanoes and the economy Charlotte Benson-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521592543 20160528
Volcanoes and the Environment is a comprehensive and accessible text incorporating contributions from some of the world's authorities in volcanology. This book is an indispensable guide for those interested in how volcanism affects our planet's environment. It spans a wide variety of topics from geology to climatology and ecology; it also considers the economic and social impacts of volcanic activity on humans. Topics covered include how volcanoes shape the environment, their effect on the geological cycle, atmosphere and climate, impacts on health of living on active volcanoes, volcanism and early life, effects of eruptions on plant and animal life, large eruptions and mass extinctions, and the impact of volcanic disasters on the economy. This book is intended for students and researchers interested in environmental change from the fields of earth and environmental science, geography, ecology and social science. It will also interest policy makers and professionals working on natural hazards.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521592543 20160528
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
GES-185

3. Volcanism [2004]

Book
x, 324 p. : ill. (chiefly col.), maps ; 25 cm.
  • Introduction.- Plate Tectonics.- Magma.- Rheology, Magmatic Gases, Bubbles and Triggering of Eruptions.- Mid-Ocean Ridges.- Seamounts and Volcanic Islands.- Continental Intraplate Volcanoes.- Subduction Zone Volcanoes.- Volcanic Edifices and Volcanic Deposits.- Strombolian, Hawaiian and Plinian Eruptions and the Mount St. Helens Eruption 1980.- Pyroclastic Flows, Block and Ash Flows, Surges and the Laacher See Eruption.- Fire and Water.- Volcanic Hazards, Volcanic Catastrophes and Disaster Mitigation.- Volcanoes and Climate.- Man and Volcanoes: The Benefits.- Physical Units and Abbreviations.- Glossary.- References.- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9783540436508 20160528
Volcanic eruptions are the clear and dramatic expression of dynamic processes going on in planet Earth. The author, one of the most profound specialists in the field of volcanology, explains in a concise and easy to understand manner the basics and most recent findings in the field of volcanology. Based on plate tectonics and illustrated with more than 300 color figures, the book offers insights into the generation of magmas and the occurrence and origin of volcanoes. The analysis and description of volcanic structures is followed by process-oriented chapters discussing the role of magmatic gases, as well as explosive mechanisms and sedimentation of volcanic material. The final chapters deal with the forecast of eruptions and their influence on climate. Students and scientists from a broad range of fields will find this book an interesting and attractive source of information. From the reviews: "The science of volcanology has made tremendous progress over the past 40 years, primarily because of technological advances and because each tragic eruption has led researchers to recognize the processes behind such serious hazards. Yet scientists are still learning a great deal because of photographs that either capture those processes in action or show us the critical factors left behind in the rock record. Volcanism by Hans-Ulrich Schmincke has photos of the best quality I have ever seen in a text on the subject. I found myself wishing that I had had the photo of Nicaragua's Masaya volcano, which was the subject of my dissertation, but it was Schmincke who was able to include it in his book. In addition, the schematic figures in their wide range of styles are clear, colorful, and simplified to emphasize the most important factors while including all significant features. The book's paper is of such high quality that at times I felt I had turned two pages rather than one. I have really enjoyed reading and rereading Schmincke's book. It fills a great gap in texts available for teaching any basic course in volcanology. No other book I know of has the depth and breadth of Volcanism. I was disappointed that the text did not arrive on my desk until last August, when it was too late for me to choose it for my course in volcanology. I am also disappointed about another fact--the book's binding is already becoming tattered because of my intense use of it! Schmincke is a volcanologist who, in 1967, first published papers on sedimentary rocks of volcanic origin, the direction traveled by lava flows millions of years ago, and the structures preserved in explosive ignimbrites, or pumice-flow deposits, that reveal important details of their formation. Since then, his studies in Germany's Laacher See, the Canary Islands, the Troodos Ophiolite of Cyprus, and many other regions have forged great fundamental advances. Such contributions have been recognized with his receipt of several international awards and clearly give him a strong base for writing the book. However, as a scientist who has focused on the challenges of monitoring the very diverse activities of volcanoes, I think that the text's overriding emphasis on the rock record has its cost. The group of scientists who are struggling with their goals to reduce or mitigate the hazards of the eruptions of tomorrow need to learn more about the options of technology, instrumentation, and methodology that are currently available. More than 500 million people live near the more than 1500 known active volcanoes and are constantly facing serious threats of eruptions. An extremely energetic earthquake caused the horrific tsunamis of 2004. However, the tsunamis of 1792, 1815, and 1883, which were caused by the eruptions of Japan's Unzen volcano and Indonesia's Tambora and Krakatau volcanoes, each took a similar toll. ( Stanley N. Williams, PHYSICS TODAY, April 2005).
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783540436508 20160528
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
GES-185

4. Volcanoes [2004]

Book
x, 521 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
  • 1. The Basics: isotopes and green cheese-- 2. Keeping planets cool: volcanoes, hot-spots, and plate tectonics-- 3. Four classic eruptions-- 4. Magma - the hot stuff-- 5. Types of volcanic activity-- 6. Lava Flows-- 7. Pyroclastic eruptions: bubbles, bangs, columns, and currents-- 8. What goes up must come down: pyroclastic fall deposits-- 9. Pyroclastic currents from collapsing domes and transient eruptions-- 10. Pyroclastic currents and ignimbrites associated with plinian eruptions-- 11. Super-eruptions, super-volcanoes and calderas-- 12. Debris avalanches and flows: magic carpets and muck-- 13. Volcanoes as landscape forms-- 14. Submarine volcanism-- 15. Extraterrestrial volcanoes-- 16. Eruptions and climate-- 17. Volcano monitoring-- 18. Reducing volcanic risks.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199254699 20160528
The impact of volcanic eruptions on the Earth's environment has been the source of many a debate and the cause of extensive research activities by leading academics worldwide. The new edition of Peter Francis's Volcanoes preserves the particular strengths of the orignal in its accessibility, immense clarity, engaging humour and excellent illustrations. The book updates the original by reflecting on new research findings and new eruptions (such as that on Montserrat) as well as including a new chapter on volcanic hazards, which looks at the complex and scientific and sociological issues surrounding risk mitigation. In updating the planetary perspective of the book new co-author Clive Oppenheimer provides us with an insight into studies of Mars and Jupiter. The book is designed primarily for undergraduate students across a range of disciplines including geology, Earth sciences, geography, environmental sciences and planetary sciences, yet, is an equally valuable source for volcanologists, senior scientists in other disciplines and scientifically-trained volcano enthusiasts. Companion Web Site All the figures from the book will be available to download free from the companion web site.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199254699 20160528
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
GES-185
Book
xxiv, 1417 p. : ill. (some col.), maps (some col.) ; 29 cm.
  • R.D. Ballard, Foreword. Origin and Transport of Magma: H. Sigurdsson, B. Houghton, H. Rymer, J. Stix, and S. McNutt, Introduction. H. Sigurdsson, The History of Volcanology. R. Jeanloz, Mantle of the Earth. P. Asimov, Melting the Mantle. M. Daines, Migration of Melt. M. Perfit and J. Davidson, Tectonics and Volcanism. N.W. Rogers and C.J. Hawkesworth, Composition of Magmas. T.L. Grove, Origin of Magmas. P.J. Wallace and A.T. Anderson, Volatiles in Magmas. F.J. Spera, Physical and Thermodynamic Properties of Magmas. B.D. Marsh, Reservoirs of Magma and Magma Chambers. M.J. Rutherford and J. Gardner, Rates of Magma Ascent. C. Carrigan, Plumbing Systems. C. Jaupart, Magma at Shallow Levels. Eruption: T. Simkin and L. Siebert, Active Volcanoes on the Earth. D.M. Pyle, Sizes of Volcanic Eruptions. H. Sigurdsson, Episodes of Volcanism. Effusive Volcanism: G.P.L. Walker, Basaltic Volcanoes and Volcanic Systems. C. Kilburn, Lava Flows. J. Fink and S. Anderson, Domes and Coulees. J. Wolff and J. Sumner, Spatter-Fed Lavas and Fire-Fountaining. C. Conner and M. Conway, Basaltic Volcanic Fields. P. Hooper, Flood Basalt Provinces. R. Batiza and J. White, Submarine Lavas and Hyaloclastite. R. Schmidt and H.-U. Schmincke, Seamounts, Submarine Volcanoes, and Volcanic Islands. J. Smellie, Sub-Glacial Eruptions. Explosive Volcanism: Cashman, B. Sturtevant, P. Papale, and O. Navon, Magmatic Fragmentation. M.M. Morrisey, B. Zimoriski, K. Wohletz, and R. Buettner, Phreatomagmatic Fragmentation. S. Vergniolle and M. Mangan, Strombolian and Hawaiian Eruptions. M.M. Morrissey and L.G. Mastin, Vulcanian Eruptions. Cioni, P. Marianelli, R. Santecroce, and A. Sbrana, Plinian Eruptions. J.D.L. White and B. Houghton, Pyroclastic Eruptions. B.F. Houghton, C.J.N. Wilson, R.T. Smith, and J.S. Gilbert, Phreatoplinian Eruptions. S. Carey and M.I. Bursik, Volcanic Plumes. C.J.N. Wilson and B.F. Houghton, Pyroclastic Transport and Deposition. B.F. Houghton, C.J.N. Wilson, and D.M. Pyle, Fall Deposits. G. Valentine and R.V. Fisher, Deposits of Surges and Directed Blasts. A. Freundt, S.N. Carey, and C.J.N. Wilson, Ignimbrites and Deposits of Block-and-Ash Flows. J.W. Vallance, Lahar Deposits. T. Ui and M. Yoshimoto, Debris Avalanche Deposits. S. Carey, Volcaniclastic Sedimentation Around Island Arces. P.W. Lipman, Calderas. J.P. Davidson and S. Da Silva, Composite Cones. D. Vespermann and H.U. Schmincke, Scoria Cones and Tuff Rings. Extraterrestrial Volcanism: P.D. Spudis, Volcanism on the Moon. R. Lopes-Gautier, Volcanism on IO. L. Crumpler, Volcanism on Venus.J.R. Zimbelman, Volcanism on Mars.P. Geissler, Cryovolcanism in the Outer Solar System. Volcano Interactions: P. delMelle and J. Stix, Volcanic Gases. F. Goff and C. Janik, Geothermal Systems. P. Browne and M. Hochstein, Surface Manifestations. D. Butterfield, Submarine Hydrothermal Vents. P. delMelle and A. Bernard, Volcanic Lakes. N.C. White and R.J. Harrington, Mineral Deposits Associated with Volcanism. Volcanic Hazards: T.P. Miller and T.J. Casadevall, Volcanic Ash Hazards to Aviation. M.J. Mills and O.B. Toon, Volcanic Aerosol and Global Atmospheric Effect. S. Nekada, Hazards from Pyroclastic Flows and Surges. D. Peterson and R.I. Tilling, Lava Flow Hazards. K. Rodolfo, Lahars and Jokulhlaup Hazards. H. Rymer and G. Williams-Jones, Volcanic Gas Hazards. J.E. Beget, Volcanic Tsunamis. S.R. McNutt, Volcanic Seismicity. P. Baxter, Impacts of Eruptions on Human Health. M. Arthur, The Volcanic Contribution to the Sulfur and Carbon Geochemical Cycle. I. Thornton, The Ecology of Volcanoes-Biological Recovery and Colonization. M. Rampino and S. Self, Volcanism and Biotic Extinction. Eruption Response and Mitigation: S.R. McNutt, Seismic Monitoring. J.B. Murray, C.A. Locke, and H.Rymer, Ground Deformation, Gravity, and Magnetics. J. Stix and H. Gaonach, Gas, Plume, and Thermal Monitoring. S. McNutt, J. Stix, and H. Rymer, Synthesis of Volcano Monitoring. C. Newhall, Volcano Warnings. S. de la Cruz, R. Quaas, and R. Meli, Volcanic Crisis Management. R. Blong, Volcanic Hazards and Risk Management. D. Johnson and K. Ronan, Risk Education and Intervention. Economic Benefits and Cultural Aspects of Volcanism: S. Arnorsson, Exploitation of Geothermal Resources. C-l. Ping, Volcanic Soils. J. Dehn and S.R. McNutt, Volcanic Materials for Commerce and Industry. H. Sigurdsson and R. Lopes-Gautier, Volcanoes and Tourism. S. Harris, Archaeology and Volcanism. H. Sigurdsson, Volcanoes in Art. H. Sigurdsson and R. Lopes, Volcanoes in Literature and Film. Appendices: Units and Physical Properties of the Earth-- Volcanoes of the Earth.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780126431407 20160528
Volcanoes are unquestionably one of the most spectacular and awe-inspiring features of the physical world. Our paradoxical fascination with them stems from their majestic beauty and powerful, if sometimes deadly, destructiveness. Not withstanding the tremendous advances in volcanology since ancient times, some of the mystery surrounding volcanic eruptions remains today. "The Encyclopedia of Volcanoes" summarizes our present knowledge of volcanoes. Through its thematic organization around the melting of the earth, it provides a comprehensive source of information on the multidisciplinary influences of volcanic eruptions - both the destructive as well as the beneficial aspects. The majority of the chapters focus on the geoscience-related aspects of volcanism (radioactive heat source, melting rock, ascent of magma, surface phenomena associated with exiting magma, extraterrestrial volcanism, etc.). In addition, complementary chapters discuss the multidisciplinary aspects of volcanism; these include the history of volcanology, geothermal energy resources, interaction with the oceans and atmosphere, health aspects of volcanism, mitigation of volcanic disasters, post-eruption ecology, and the impact of eruptions on organismal biodiversity. In addition to its appeal to educators, students, and professional and amateur scientists, the "Encyclopedia of Volcanoes" functions as an important information resource for administrators and officials responsible for developing and implementing volcanic hazard mitigation around the world. Features include: the first and only reference work to cover all aspects of volcanology; more than 80 separate peer-reviewed articles - all original contributions by leading authors from major institutions of science around the world, commissioned for this work; an integrated transition from the volcanic process through hazards, risk, and societal impacts, with an emphasis on how volcanoes have influenced and shaped society; convenient single-volume format with topics arranged thematically - articles provide coverage of nine different aspects of volcanology; each entry in the Encyclopedia begins with an outline of the article content and a concise definition of the subject of the article; 3,000 Glossary entries explain key terms; Further Reading lists appear at the end of each entry; extensive cross-referencing system links related articles; and, sixteen pages of color will convey the science and excitement of this often violent phenomena. This work includes a large 8 1/2" x 11" page size, easy-to-read double-column format.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780126431407 20160528
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
GES-185
Book
xv, 270, viii p., 16 p. of plates ; 26 cm.
  • 1. Volcanoes: From Magmas to Tephra and Epivolcanoclastics 2. Eruptive Styles and Pyroclastic Deposits 3. A Common Magma Source for Upper Cenozoic Lavas and Closely Associated Ignimbrites From South-Central Andes 4. The Role of Pyroclastic Eruptions in Constructing a Volcanic Island: Linosa, Sicilian Channel, Italy 5. Peperites From the Limagne Trench (Auvergne, French Massif Central): A Distinctive Facies of Phreatomagmatic Pyroclastics. 6. History of a Semantic Drift 7. Flank.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9789056992781 20160528
Recent research has emphasised the important part played by tephra during the evolution of volcanoes and their subsequent emission. Huge amounts of volcaniclasts are released by explosive volcanoes with significant impact on diverse aspects such as population safety, hydrology and the filling of sedimentary basins. This volume examines the production, transport and deposition of volcaniclasts (tephra and epiclasts) as well as their economic geology, particular in terms of reservoir engineering, hydrothermalism and hydrothermal mineralisations, hazard and development. Volcaniclastic Rocks, from Magmas to Sediments is an excellently written and beautifully illustrated textbook compiled by a multidisciplinary group of experts which will be of great value to postgraduates, researchers and working professionals in the earth sciences, especially in volcanology as well as economic, engineering and environmental geology.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789056992781 20160528
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
GES-185
Book
x, 198 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 30 cm.
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
GES-185
Book
xvi, 528 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
GES-185
Book
xviii, 528 p. : ill., plates, ; 25 cm.
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
GES-185