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Video
1 videodisc (201 min.) : sound, color ; 4 3/4 in. + 1 booklet. Sound: digital; optical; mono. Digital: video file; Blu-Ray; region A.
Jeanne Dielman is a young widow who goes through her daily domestic routine including making the bed, cooking for her grown son, and turning the occasional trick. Includes interviews, booklet, documentary, and more.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes), Media & Microtext Center
FILMSTUD-408-01
Book
viii, 284 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
In The Long Take, Lutz Koepnick posits extended shot durations as a powerful medium for exploring different modes of perception and attention in our fast-paced world of mediated stimulations. Grounding his inquiry in the long takes of international filmmakers such as Be9la Tarr, Tsai Ming-liang, Abbas Kiarostami, Apichatpong Weerasethakul, and Michael Haneke, Koepnick reveals how their films evoke wondrous experiences of surprise, disruption, enchantment, and reorientation. He proceeds to show how the long take has come to thrive in diverse artistic practices across different media platforms: from the work of photographer Hiroshi Sugimoto to the screen-based installations of Sophie Calle and Tacita Dean, from experimental work by Francis Alffs and Janet Cardiff to durational images in contemporary video games. Deeply informed by film and media theory, yet written in a fluid and often poetic style, The Long Take goes far beyond recent writing about slow cinema. In Koepnicks account, the long take serves as a critical hallmark of international art cinema in the twenty-first century. It invites viewers to probe the aesthetics of moving images and to recalibrate their sense of time. Long takes unlock windows toward the new and unexpected amid the ever-mounting pressures of 24/7 self-management.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780816695881 20180122
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
FILMSTUD-408-01
Book
xi, 306 pages : illustrations ; 26 cm
  • Artificial darkness
  • Dark theaters
  • Black screens
  • The black art of Georges Méliès
  • Spaceless play : Oskar Schlemmer's dance against enlightenment
  • Coda : historical darknesses.
Darkness has a history and a uniquely modern form. Distinct from night, shadows, and artificial light, artificial darkness has been overlooked until now. In fact, controlled darkness was essential to the rise of photography and cinema, science and spectacle, and a century of advanced art and film. "Artificial Darkness" is the first book to historicize and theorize this phenomenon and map its applications across a range of media and art forms. In exploring how artificial darkness shaped modern art, film, and media, Noam M. Elcott addresses seminal and obscure works alongside their sites of production such as photography darkrooms, film studios, and laboratories and their sites of reception, including theaters, cinemas, and exhibitions. He argues that artists, scientists, and entertainers like Etienne-Jules Marey, Richard Wagner, Georges Melies, and Oskar Schlemmer revolutionized not only images but also everything surrounding them: the screen, the darkness, and the experience of bodies and space. At the heart of the book is the black screen, a technology of darkness that spawned today s blue and green screens and has undergirded numerous advanced art and film practices to this day. Turning familiar art and film narratives on their heads, "Artificial Darkness" is a revolutionary treatment of an elusive, yet fundamental, aspect of art and media history.".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226328973 20160704
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
FILMSTUD-408-01
Book
x, 288 pages, 2 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations (some color) ; 24 cm
  • Preface Introduction. The Literary History of Distraction The Unifocal and the Multifocal The Rise of the Distracted CharacterAttention, Distraction, and Enlightenment Philosophy of MindA Swiftly Tilting MadnessCategorizing Distraction 1. Mind Wandering: Forms of Distraction in the Eighteenth-Century EssayDistraction and the Eighteenth-Century Essay The Rhetoric of Attention: Appealing to Pathos and Brevitas The Essay as a Tool of Focus Training Attention to Attention Strengthening Focus: Repetition and Dramatic Irony Economies of Attention The History of Attention Span 2. Lapses of Concentration: Distracted Vigilance and the Female MindEnvironment and Mind: Urban Diversion and the Distracted Brain The Problem of a Soft Female Mind Sex, Environment, and the Multifocal Coquette The Challenges of Situational Awareness Philosophizing Multiplicity: Cognitive Bottlenecks and Sorting Gloves Strained Omniscience and the Distracted Heroine The Crowded Syntax of Sexual Inattention "Might as Well Be Passed Over as Read:" Indulging the Diverted Reader 3. Scattered Attention: Distraction and the Rhythm of Cognitive Overload Rhythms of Narrative, Rhythms of Mind The Scattered Rhythms of Cognitive Overload Susannah and the Vexed Situation of Madam Reader The Anatomy of Parallel Processing The Sermon: Asynchronous Rhythms of Prose Hobbyhorses and the Individual Beat of Interest Irregular Distraction: The Tempo of Cognitive Overload Rhythms of the Brain: Creativity and the Timing of Distraction 4. Fixated Attention: The Gothic Pathology of Single-Minded FocusMicroscope and Mind Scientific Metaphors and the Madness of Attention The Politics and Poetics of Fixation Involuntary Attention: A Multifocal Selective Blindness Sympathy and the Benefits of Distraction Rewriting Suspense: Interruption and the Gothic Sublime Fixation and the Science of Obsession 5. Divided Attention: Characterization and Cognitive Richness in Jane Austen The Power of Multitasking in Pride and Prejudice The Singular Importance of Inattentive Characters Mr. Hurst: The Limited Capacity of the Undivided Mind Mrs. Jenkinson: Narrow Bandwidth and the Creation of Depth Lydia and Miss Bingley: Caricaturing Cognitive Vacancy The Dangers of Too Much Attention Distraction as Liveliness of Mind Mary Bennet: Hyperfocus and Cognitive Immobility Lady Catherine de Bourgh: The Problem of Excess Vigilance Elizabeth Bennet: The Benefits of Diversion Characterizing Reading: Maps of Distraction and Interest Coda: History of Mind and Literary Neuroscience Interdisciplinarity: From Theory to Practice Literary Attention: An fMRI Study of Reading Jane Austen The Value of Literary History NotesBibliographyIndex.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781421420127 20161114
Early novel reading typically conjures images of rapt readers in quiet rooms, but commentators at the time described reading as a fraught activity, one occurring amidst a distracting cacophony that included sloshing chamber pots and wailing street vendors. Auditory distractions were compounded by literary ones as falling paper costs led to an explosion of print material, forcing prose fiction to compete with a dizzying array of essays, poems, sermons, and histories. In Distraction, Natalie M. Phillips argues that prominent Enlightenment authors-from Jane Austen and William Godwin to Eliza Haywood and Samuel Johnson-were deeply engaged with debates about the wandering mind, even if they were not equally concerned about the problem of distractibility. Phillips explains that some novelists in the 1700s-viewing distraction as a dangerous wandering from singular attention that could lead to sin or even madness-attempted to reform diverted readers. Johnson and Haywood, for example, worried that contemporary readers would only focus long enough to "look into the first pages" of essays and novels; Austen offered wry commentary on the issue through the creation of the daft Lydia Bennet, a character with an attention span so short she could listen only "half-a-minute." Other authors radically redefined distraction as an excellent quality of mind, aligning the multiplicity of divided focus with the spontaneous creation of new thought. Laurence Sterne's Tristram Shandy, for example, won audiences with its comically distracted narrator and uniquely digressive form. Using cognitive science as a framework to explore the intertwined history of mental states, philosophy, science, and literary forms, Phillips explains how arguments about the diverted mind made their way into the century's most celebrated literature. She also draws a direct link between the disparate theories of focus articulated in eighteenth-century literature and modern experiments in neuroscience, revealing that contemporary questions surrounding short attention spans are grounded in long conversations over the nature and limits of focus.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781421420127 20161114
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
FILMSTUD-408-01
Book
xii, 196 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Tempo Tantrums : Speed and the Cultural Politics of Time
  • Jet-Lag Luxury : The Architecture of Time Maintenance
  • Temporal Labor and the Taxicab : Maintaining the Time of Others
  • Dharma at the Desk : Recalibrating the Sedentary Worker
  • Slow Space : Another Pace and Time
  • Toward a Temporal Public.
The world is getting faster. This sentiment is proclaimed so often that it is taken for granted, rarely questioned or examined by those who celebrate the notion of an accelerated culture or by those who decry it. Sarah Sharma engages with that assumption in this sophisticated critical inquiry into the temporalities of everyday life. Sharma conducted ethnographic research among individuals whose jobs or avocations involve a persistent focus on time: taxi drivers, frequent-flyer business travelers, corporate yoga instructors, devotees of the slow-food and slow-living movements. Based on that research, she develops the concept of "power-chronography" to make visible the entangled and uneven politics of temporality. Focusing on how people's different relationships to labor configures their experience of time, she argues that both "speed-up" and "slow-down" often function as a form of biopolitical social control necessary to contemporary global capitalism.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780822354772 20160614
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
FILMSTUD-408-01
Book
xvi, 347 pages : illustrations ; 21 cm
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
FILMSTUD-408-01
Video
1 Blu-ray videodisc (154 min.) : sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in. + 1 DVD-video (sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in.) Sound: digital; optical. Dolby Digital. Video: NTSC. Digital: video file; Blu-ray; region 1. video file; DVD video; region 1.
The Autobots learn of a Cybertronian spacecraft hidden on the moon and race against the Decepticons to reach it and to learn its secrets.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes), Media & Microtext Center
FILMSTUD-408-01
Book
479 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • What is a minor history?
  • The social turn
  • The tower and the line
  • Concept art
  • Primitives and flaming creatures
  • Flicker.
This book examines Tony Conrad's collaborative interactions as a guiding thread by which to investigate the contiguous networks and discursive interconnections in 1960s art.Tony Conrad has significantly influenced cultural developments from minimalism to underground film, "concept art, " postmodern appropriation, and the most sophisticated rock and roll. Creator of the "structural" film, "The Flicker", collaborator on Jack Smith's "Flaming Creatures" and "Normal Love", follower of Henry Flynt's radical anti-art, member of the Theatre of Eternal Music and the first incarnation of The Velvet Underground, and early associate of Mike Kelley, Tony Oursler, and Cindy Sherman, Conrad has eluded canonic histories.Yet "Beyond the Dream Syndicate" does not claim Conrad as a major but underrecognized figure. Neither monograph nor social history, the book takes Conrad's collaborative interactions as a guiding thread by which to investigate the contiguous networks and discursive interconnections in 1960s art. Such an approach simultaneously illuminates and estranges current understandings of the period, redrawing the map across medium and stylistic boundaries to reveal a constitutive hybridization at the base of the decade's artistic development.This exploration of Conrad and his milieu goes beyond the presentation of a relatively overlooked oeuvre to chart multiple, contestatory regimes of power simultaneously in play during the pivotal moment of the 1960s. From the sovereign authority invoked by Young's music, to the "paranoiac" politics of Flynt, to the immanent control modeled by Conrad's films, each avant-garde project examined reveals an investment within a particular structure of power and resistance, providing a glimpse into the diversity of the artistic and political stakes that continue to define our time.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781890951863 20160528
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
FILMSTUD-408-01
Video
7 videodiscs (18 hr., 48 min.) : sd., chiefly b&w ; 4 3/4 in. + Booklet.
  • Disc 1. The mechanized eye: experiments in technique and form (161 min.). Paris Exposition films (1900) / James White, Edison Manufacturing Co. Eiffel Tower from Trocadero Palace (1900). Palace of electricity (1900). Champs de Mars (1900). Panorama of Eiffel Tower (1900). Scene from elevator ascending Eiffel Tower (1900). Captain Nissen going through Whirlpool Rapids, Niagara Falls (1901) / Edison Manufacturing Co. Down the Hudson (1903) / Frederick S. Armitage and A.E. Weed, American Mutoscope and Biograph Co. The ghost train (1903) / American Mutoscope and Biograph Co. Westinghouse works, panorama view, street car motor room (1904) / G.W. "Billy" Bitzer, American Mutoscope and Biograph Co. In youth, beside the lonely sea (c.1924-25). Melody on parade (c. 1936). A Cartomancienne ( The fortune teller) (1932) / Jerome Hill. Pie in the sky (1934-35) / Nykino. Travel notes (1932) / Walker Evans. Oil, a symphony in motion (1933) / Artkino. Poem 8 (1932-22) / Emlen Etting. Storm (1942-43) / Paul Burnford. Portrait of a young man (1925-31) / Henwar Rodakiewicz. Movement one. Movement two. Movement three.
  • -- disc 2. The devil's plaything: American surrealism (161 min.). Jack and the beanstalk (1902) / Edwin S. Porter, Edison Manufacturing Co. Dream of a rarebit fiend (1906) / Edwin S. Porter, Edison Manufacturing Co. The Thieving hand (1907) / Vitagraph Company of America. Impossible conficts (1905) / G.W. "Billy" Bitzer, American Mutoscope and Biograph Co. When the clouds roll by (1919, excerpt) / Douglas Fairbanks, Victor Fleming. Beggar on horseback (1925, excerpt) / James Cruze. The fall of the house of Usher (1926-1928) / J.S. Watson, Jr., Melville Webber. The life and death of 9413, a Hollywood extra (1927) / Robert Florey, Slavko Vorkapich. The love of zero (1928) / Robert Florey, William Cameron Menzies. The telltale heart (1928) / Charles Klein. Tomatos another day (1930/1933) / J.S. Watson, Jr., Alec Wilder. The hearts of age (1934) / William Vance, Orson Welles. The enigmatic world of Joseph Cornell. Unreal news reels, nos. 1&2 (c. 1926). The children's jury (c.1938). Thimble theater (c. 1938?) / Joseph Cornell, Lawrence Jordan. Carousel, animal opera (c.1938?) / Joseph Cornell, Lawrence Jordan. Jack's dream (c.1938?) / JosephCornell, Lawrence Jordan.
  • -- disc 3. Light rhythms: music and abstraction (168 min.) Le retour à la raison ( Return to reason) (1932) / Man Ray. Ballet méchanique (1923-24) / Fernand Léger, Dudley Murphy. Anémic cinéma (1924-26) / Rrose Sélavy. Loony lens: Anamorphic people (1927) / Al Brick. Out of the melting pot (1927). H2) (1929) / Ralph Steiner. Surf and seaweed (1929-1930) / Ralph Steiner. Vorkapich montage sequences / Slavko Vorkapich. The furies (1934). Legacy of a Hollywood extra. Skyline dance (1928). Money machine (1929). Prohibition (1929). The firefly (1937, excerpts,Vorkapich edit and MGM release version). Maytime (1937, excerpt). Light and abstraction. So this is Paris (1926, excerpt) / Ernst Lubitsch. Light rhythms (1930) / Francis Burgière. Une nuit sur le Mont Chauve ( Night on bald mountain) (1934) / Alexandre Alexieff, Claire Parker. Rhythm in light (1934) / Mary Ellen Bute, Ted Nemeth, Melville Webber. Synchromy No. 2 (1936) / Mary Ellen Bute, Ted Nemeth. Parabola (1937) / Rutherford Boyd, Mary Ellen Bute, Ted Nemeth. Footlight Parade, By a waterfall (1933, excerpt) / Busby Berkeley. Glens Falls Sequence (1936-1946) / Douglass Crockwell. Simple destiny abstractions (1937-40) / Douglass Crockwell. Abstract movies (1937-47) / George L.K. Morris. Scherzo (1939) / Norman McLaren. Composition no. 1: Themis (1940) / Dwinell Grant. Composition no. 2: Contrathemis (1941) / Dwinell Grant. 1941. (1941) / Francis lee. Moods of the sea (1941) / Slavko Vorkapich, John Hoffman.
  • -- disc 4. Inverted narratives: new directions in storytelling (155 min.). The house with closed shutters (1910) / D.W. Griffith. Suspense (1913) /rLois Weber, Phillips Smalley. Moonland (c.1923-26) / Neil McGuire, William A. O'Connor. Lullaby (1929) / Boris Deutsch. The bridge (1929-30) / Charles Vidor. Little Geezer (1932) / Theodore Huff. Black dawn (1933) / Josef Berne. Titles. Plowing. End of day. A night to remember. Native land (1937-1941) / Leo Hurwitz, Paul Strand. Bought and paid for. On the march. Millions of little people. Murder one man. The world today: Black legion (1936-37) / Nykino. Even as you and I (1937) / Roger Barlow, Harry Hay, Le Roy Robbins. Object lesson (1941) / Christopher Young. Sredni Vashtar by Saki (1940-43) / David Bradley.
  • -- disc 5. Picturing a metropolis: New York City unveiled (152 min.). Early views. The blizzard (1899) / American Mutoscope and Biograph Co. Lower Broadway (1902) / Robert K. Bonine, American Mutoscope and Biograph Co. Beginning of a skyscraper (1902) / Robert K. Bonine, American Mutoscope and Biograph Co. Panorama from Times Building, New York (1905) / Wallace McCutcheon, American Mutoscope and Biograph Co. Skyscrapers of NYC from North River (1903) / J.B. Smith, Edison Manufacturing Co. Panorama from the tower of the Brooklyn Bridge (1903) / G.W. "Billy" Bitzer, American Mutoscope and Biograph Co. Tricks of the trade. Demolishing and building up the Star Theatre (1901) / Frederick S. Amritage, American Mutoscope and Biograph Co. Coney Island at night (1905) / Edwin S. Porter, Edison Manufaturing Co. Interior New York subway, 14th St. to 42nd St. (1905) / G.W. "Billy" Bitzer, American Mutoscope and Biograph CO. Seeing New York by yacht (1902) / Frederick S. Artitage, A.E. Weed, American Mutoscope and Biograph Co. Looney lens: April skyscrapers (1924) / Al Brick. Loony lens: Tenth Avenue, NYC (1924) / Al Brick. Scenes from Ford educational weekly (1916-1924). 8th Avenue elevated train at 112th st. The trellis--work of sunshine and shade. View of Herald Square station. Aerial view of Sixth Ave. train at 28th, 26th, 24th. Manhatta (1921) / Charles Sheeler, Paul Strand. 24 Dollar island (c.1926) / Robert Flaherty. Skyscraper symphony (1929) / Robert Florey. Manhattan melody (1931) / Bonney Powell. A Bronx morning (1931) / Jay Leyda. Footnote to fact (1933) / Lewis Jacobs. Seeing the world, pt. 1, a visit to New York, N.Y. (1937) / Rudy Burckhardt. The pursuit of happiness (1940) / Rudy Burckhardt. Gold diggers of 1935, Lullaby of Broadway (1935) / Busby Berkeley. Autumn fire (1931033) / Herman G. Weinberg.
  • -- disc 6. The amateur as actor: discovering paradise in pictures (175 min.) Case sound tests (c.1924-25) / Theodore Case, E.I. Sponable. Theodore Case. Man and harmonica. Man and harp. Gus Visser and his singing duck. Theodore Case. Man and ukulele. Theodore Case. Windy ledge farm (1929-34) / Elizabeth Woodman Wright. A day in Santa Fe (1931) / Lynn Riggs, James Hughes. Stewart family home movies. (c. 1936-39) / Archie Stewart. Joseph Cornell's children trilogy. Children's party (1938) / Joseph Cornell, Lawrence Jordan. Cotillion (c.1938) / Joseph Cornell, Lawrence Jordan. The midnight party (c. 1938) / Joseph Cornell, Lawrence Jordan. Haiti (1938) / Rudy Burckhardt. Tree trunk to head (1938) / Lewis Jacobs. Bicycle polo at San Mateo (1940-42) / Frank Stauffacher. 1126 Dewey Ave. Apt. 20 (1939) / attributed to John C. Hecker.
  • -- disc 7. Viva la dance: the beginnings of cine-dance (155 min.). Annabelle dances and dances (1894-1897) / W.K.L. Dickson, WiIliam Heise, James White, Edison Manufacturing Co. and American Mutoscope and Biograph Co. Anabelle butterfly dance # 1 (1894). Anabelle butterfly dance #3 (1895). Serpentine dance by Anabelle (1896). Anabelle serpentine dance # 1 (1894). Anabelle serpentine dance #4 (1897). Crissie Sheridan serpentine dance (1897). Anabelle serpentine dance #4 (1897). Early superimpositions / Frederick S. Armitage, American Mutoscope and Biograph Co. Davy Jones Locker (1900). Neptune's daughters (1900). A nymph of the waves (1900). Diana the huntress (1916) / Charles Allen, Francis Trevelyan Miller. The soul of the cypress (1920) / Dudley Murphy. Loony lens: Pas de deux (1924) / Al Brick. Hände: das Leben und die Liebe eines Zärtlichen Geschlechts ( Hands, the life and loves of the gentler sex) (1927-28) / Stella Simon, Miklós Bándy. Mechanical principals (1930) / Ralph Steiner. Tilly Losch in her dance of the hands (1930-33). Sergei Eisenstein's Mexican footage (1931) / Sergei Eisenstein, Grigory Alexandrov, Edward Tissé. Dance of the heads. Day of the dead. Oramunde (1933) / Emlen Etting. Hands (1934) / Willard Van Dyke, Ralph Steiner. Joie de vivre (1934) / Anthony Gross, Hector Hoppin. Wonder Bar, Don't say goodnight (1934) / Busby Berkeley.tDada (1936) / Mary Ellen Bute, Ted Nemeth. Escape (1938) / Mary Ellen Bute, Ted Nemeth. An optical poem (1938) / Oskar Fischinger. Abstract experiment in Kodachrome. 1940-50s) / Slavko Vorkapich. NBC valentine greeting (1939-40) / Norman McLaren. Stars and stripes (1940) / Norman McLaren. Tarantella (1940 / Mary Ellen Bute, Ted Nemeth, Norman McLaren. Spook sport (1940) / Mary Ellen Bute, Ted Nemeth, Norman McLaren. Danse macabre (1922) / Dudley Murphy, Francis Bruguière/ Peer Gynt (1941) / David Bradley. Opening titles. Pagan Dance. Introspection (1941-46) / Sara Kathlyn Arledge.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes), Media & Microtext Center
FILMSTUD-408-01
Video
1videodisc (83 min.) : sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in.
"Set almost entirely in a crumbling movie theater on its final night, acclaimed filmmaker Tsai Ming-liang crafts on elegant and tender valentine to the pleasures of moviegoing and the death of a cinematic age. Run by a lonely famale ticket clerk and a young projectionist, the theater shows King Hu's 1967 martial art epic Dragon Inn before darkening its screen forever. A sparse audience gathers, some attending to watch film, others attending in search of a connection. When a young Japanese tourist encounters someone with an uncanny resemblance to the swordsman in the film, we discover that comments about the theater's ghostly patrons may be more than rumors"--Container label.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
FILMSTUD-408-01
Book
x, 397 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
"Suspensions of Perception" is a major historical study of human attention and its volatile role in modern Western culture. It argues that the ways in which we intently look at or listen to anything result form crucial changes in the nature of perception that can be traced back to the second half of the 19th century. Focusing on the period from about 1880 to 1905, Jonathan Crary examines the connections between the modernization of subjectivity and the dramatic expansion and industrialization of visual/auditory culture. At the core of his project is the paradoxical nature of modern attention, which was both a fundamental condition of individual freedom, creativity and experience and a central element in the efficient functioning of economic and disciplinary institution, as well as the emerging space of mass consumption and spectacle. Crary approaches these issues through multiple analyses of single works by three key modernist painters - Manet, Seurat and Cezanne - who each engaged in a singular confrontation with the disruptions, vacancies and rifts within a perceptual field. Each in his own way discovered that sustained attentiveness, rather than fixing or securing the world, led to perceptual disintegration and loss of presence, and each used this discovery as the basis for a reinvention of representational practices. "Suspensions of Perception" decisively relocates the problems of aesthetic contemplation within a broader collective encounter with the unstable nature of perception - in psychology, philosophy, neurology, early cinema and photography. In doing so, it provides an historical framework for understanding the current social crisis of attention amid the accelerating metamorphoses of our contemporary technological culture.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780262032650 20160528
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
FILMSTUD-408-01
Book
333 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.
Green Library, Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
FILMSTUD-408-01
Book
xi, 549 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Part 1. Structures of Filmic Narrative Introduction: The Saussurian Impulse and Cinema Semiotics 1. "Classical Hollywood Cinema: Narrational Principles and Procedures", by David Bordwell 2. "Problems of Denotation in the Fiction Film", by Christian Metz 3. "Segmenting/Analyzing", by Raymond Bellour 4. "The Obvious and the Code", by Raymond Bellour 5. "The Spectator-in-the-Text: The Rhetoric of Stagecoach", by Nick Browne 6. "Godard and Counter-Cinema: Vent d' Est", by Peter Wollen 7. "The Concept of Cinematic Excess", by Kristin Thompson 8. "Uncoded Images in the Heterogeneous Text", by Deborah Linderman Part 2: Subject, Narrative, Cinema Introduction: Text and Subject 9. "Diderot, Brecht, Eisenstein", by Roland Barthes 10. "Theory and Film: Principles of Realism and Pleasure", by Colin MacCabe 11. "Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema", by Laura Mulvey 12. "Voyeurism, The Look, and Dwoskin", , by Paul Willemen 13. "Suture" (excerpts), by Kaja Silverman 14. "Ellipsis on Dread and the Specular Seduction", by Julia Kristeva 15. "The Imaginary Signifier" (excerpts), by Christian Metz Part 3: Apparatus Introduction 16. "Ideological Effects of the Basic Cinematographic Apparatus", by Jean-Louis Baudry 17. "The Apparatus: Metapsychological Approaches to the Impression of Reality in Cinema", by Jean-Louis Baudry 18. "The Silences of the Voice", by Pascal Bonitzer 19. "The Voice in the Cinema: The Articulation of Body and Space", by Mary Ann Doane 20. "Acinema", by Jean Francois Lyotard 21. "Through the Looking-Glass", by Teresa de Lauretis Part 4: Textuality as Ideology Introduction 22. "Narrative Space", by Stephen Heath 23. "Technique and Ideology: Camera, Perspective, Depth of Field" (Parts 3 and 4), by Jean-Louis Comolli 24. "John Ford's Young Mr. Lincoln", by Editors of Cahiers du cinema 25. "Primitivism and the Avant-Gardes: A Dialectical Approach", by Noel Burch 26. "Film Body: An Implantation of Perversions", by Linda Williams 27. "Primary Identification and the Historical Subject: Fassbinder and Germany", by Thomas Elsaesser.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780231058810 20160528
-- Dudley Andrew.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780231058810 20160528
Green Library, Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
FILMSTUD-408-01
Book
vii, 327 p. ; 23 cm.
Green Library, Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
FILMSTUD-408-01
Book
3 v. (lxviii, 1740 p.) ; 24 cm.
Green Library, Art & Architecture Library (Bowes), SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving), SAL3 (off-campus storage)
FILMSTUD-408-01