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Book
xi, 260 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Founding of the métis protection societies, 1870-1908
  • Frenchmen's children, 1910-1929
  • The Great Depression and the centralization, 1929-1938
  • War, political loyalty, and racial demography, 1938-1945
  • The last French island in Indochina, 1945-1956
  • Victims of decolonization, 1957-1983.
For over a century French officials in Indochina systematically uprooted metis children-those born of Southeast Asian mothers and white, African, or Indian fathers-from their homes. In many cases, and for a wide range of reasons-death, divorce, the end of a romance, a return to France, or because the birth was the result of rape-the father had left the child in the mother's care. Although the program succeeded in rescuing homeless children from life on the streets, for those in their mothers' care it was disastrous. Citing an 1889 French law and claiming that raising children in the Southeast Asian cultural milieu was tantamount to abandonment, colonial officials sought permanent, "protective" custody of the children, placing them in state-run orphanages or educational institutions to be transformed into "little Frenchmen." The Uprooted offers an in-depth investigation of the colony's child-removal program: the motivations behind it, reception of it, and resistance to it. Metis children, Eurasians in particular, were seen as a threat on multiple fronts-colonial security, white French dominance, and the colonial gender order. Officials feared that abandoned metis might become paupers or prostitutes, thereby undermining white prestige. Metis were considered particularly vulnerable to the lure of anticolonialist movements-their ambiguous racial identity and outsider status, it was thought, might lead them to rebellion. Metischildren who could pass for white also played a key role in French plans to augment their own declining numbers and reproduce the French race, nation, and, after World War II, empire. French child welfare organizations continued to work in Vietnam well beyond independence, until 1975. The story of the metis children they sought to help highlights the importance-and vulnerability-of indigenous mothers and children to the colonial project. Part of a larger historical trend, the Indochina case shows striking parallels to that of Australia's "Stolen Generation" and the Indian and First Nations boarding schools in the United States and Canada. This poignant and little known story will be of interest to scholars of French and Southeast Asian studies, colonialism, gender studies, and the historiography of the family.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780824847579 20160619
Green Library
FEMGEN-37S-01, FRENCH-157-01, HISTORY-37S-01
Book
xxvi, 453 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm
  • Illustrations and Maps -- Preface -- About the Authors -- Map of the French Empire in 1939 -- Map of the Francophone World in 2006 -- Chapter 1: The Embattled Republican Tradition, 1792-1870 -- France's Old Regime -- Causes of the French Revolution -- The Birth of a Republic (1789-1793) -- France's First Republic (1793-1804) -- Napoleon's Empire (1804-1815) -- Legacies of the 1789 Revolution -- The Bourbons Restored (1815-1830) -- 1830 Revolution to July Monarchy (1830-1848) -- 1848 Revolution and the Second Republic (1848-1852) -- Napoleon III and the Second Empire (1852-1870) -- Society and Economy Under the Second Empire -- Napoleon III and the City of Paris -- A Failed Liberalization -- The Empire and Europe -- Chapter 2: L'Annee Terrible, 1870-71 -- The Franco-Prussian War -- The Fall of the Empire -- From One Siege to Another -- The Paris Commune -- The Fall of the Commune -- May 1871 -- Chapter 3: The Return of the Republic, 1871-1885 -- The Early Republic -- Constitutional Laws and Crisis -- The Republic Triumphant -- The Republic and Women's Rights -- Cult of the Public -- The Republic Founds a New Empire -- The Republic and the Provinces -- The Working Class -- Chapter 4: The Imperial Republic, 1885-1894 -- Demographic and Economic Upheavals -- Boulanger's Rise and Fall -- Cultural Transformations -- Church vs. Republic? Fears of Degeneracy -- Civilizing Overseas -- The Labor Movement and Socialism -- Chapter 5: The Republic Divided, 1894-1914 -- The Dreyfus Affair -- The "Affair" -- The Denouement -- The Public Intellectual -- State and Church Go Their Separate Ways -- New Crises -- News of Cycles, Cycles of News -- A Dangerous Diplomacy -- Preparing for War -- Chapter 6: The Republic at War, 1914-1919 -- 1914: Mass Mobilization -- Taking the Offensive 1915-1916 -- The Soldier's War 31 -- The Civilian's War: Occupied Zones and the Homefront -- Private Life, Censorship, and Consent -- 1917: Breaking Point -- Revolution? -- 1918-1919: War's End -- Making Peace -- Chapter 7: The Deceptive Peace, 1919-1929 -- 1919: Fears of Revolution and a Shift to the Right -- Foreign Policy in the 1920s -- Domestic Politics: Realignment on the Left -- The Center-Right: Radicals and Conservatives -- Economic Modernization -- Women's Roles: The Advent of Modernity? -- France and its Empire -- A New Cosmopolitanism? -- Challenges to the Republic -- Calls for Renewal -- Chapter 8: The Republic in Peril, 1929-1939 -- Depression -- 1932-1934: Radicals in Power -- The Riots of February 6, 1934 -- 1934-1936: Conservatives in Power and Radicalization of the Right -- The Formation of the Popular Front -- The Road to Victory -- May-August 1936: Reform -- Economic and Foreign Policy -- Division and Failure -- The Politicization of Intellectuals -- Republican Reaction: 1938 -- War-Ready? -- The Path to War -- Chapter 9: The Dark Years, 1939-1945 -- From Phony War to the Battle of France -- Exodus and Armistice -- Vichy: Revenge of the Minorities -- Collaboration -- The National Revolution -- Daily Life in France under the Occupation -- Anti-Semitism -- Vichy and the Empire -- Resistance -- Turning Point: 1942 -- Civil War: Resistance, Liberation, and the Purge -- Turning the Page: The Myth of the Gaullist Resistance -- Chapter 10: Reconstruction at Home and Overseas, 1945-1958 -- The Provisional Government in Charge -- The New Political Landscape -- The Birth of the Fourth Republic and the French Union -- Politics as Usual? The Evolution of the Fourth Republic -- The Great Divide Between Intellectuals -- Launching an Economic Miracle -- Welfare, Repopulation, and Immigration -- Women's Lives and Changing Gender Norms -- Reimagining Europe: Franco-German Cooperation -- The Fourth Republic Refuses Decolonization -- The Algerian Quagmire -- Chapter 11: De Gaulle Founds a New Republic, 1958-1969 -- The Republic Transformed -- The Algerian War -- From Empire to Neo-Colony -- The Politics of Grandeur -- Marrying the Century -- The Affluent Society -- Explosion: May 1968 -- Youth, Intellectuals, and Culture under the Fifth Republic -- Chapter 12: A New France in a New Europe, 1969-1981 -- Reconfiguration on the Right -- Old and New Left -- Foreign Policy -- Economic Policy -- The Secularization of French Society -- Making France More Egalitarian: The Reform of Education -- Media and the Free Market of Ideas -- The Politics of Memory: De Gaulle's Resistance Myth Questioned -- The Revival of Feminism -- Sexual Minorities Demand Rights -- Immigrants' Place in the Nation -- Chapter 13: The Republic of the Center, 1981-1995 -- Socialism's Last Hurrah -- Regionalism -- Culture from Above -- Culture from Below -- Immigration and Frenchness -- The Reinvention of "La Pause" -- Foreign Policy -- Odd Bedfellows: The Evolution of Cohabitation -- Mitterrand's Second Term -- The Furor Over the Foulard -- The Paradoxes of Parity -- A Second Act for the Socialists -- France and the World -- The Autumn of the Patriarch -- Chapter 14: France since 1995 -- From "Social Fracture" to "Social Demand" -- A Nation in Search of a Definition -- The Left(s) Strike Back -- Abroad at Home -- Intellectuals: The Reason for the Clerks? -- The Republic in Danger -- Freedom Fries -- France Today -- Abbreviations -- Notes -- Suggested Readings -- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199384440 20160617
Providing an up-to-date synthesis of the history of an extraordinary nation-one that has been shrouded in myths, many of its own making-France and Its Empire Since 1870 seeks both to understand these myths and to uncover the complicated and often contradictory realities that underpin them. It situates modern French history in transnational and global contexts and also integrates the themes of imperialism and immigration into the traditional narrative. Authors Alice L. Conklin, Sarah Fishman, and Robert Zaretsky begin with the premise that while France and the U.S. are sister republics, they also exhibit profound differences that are as compelling as their apparent similarities. The authors frame the book around the contested emergence of the French Republic-a form of government that finally appears to have a permanent status in France-but whose birth pangs were much more protracted than those of the American Republic. Presenting a lively and coherent narrative of the major developments in France's tumultuous history since 1870, the authors organize the chapters around the country's many turning points and confrontations. They also offer detailed analyses of politics, society, and culture, considering the diverse viewpoints of men and women from every background including the working class and the bourgeoisie, immigrants, Catholics, Jews and Muslims, Bretons and Algerians, rebellious youth, and gays and lesbians.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199384440 20160617
Green Library
FEMGEN-37S-01, FRENCH-157-01, HISTORY-37S-01
Book
xi, 494 pages : illustrations, maps ; 23 cm
  • Introduction Chapter 1: French Revolution, World Revolution France and Europe in 1789 Enlightening the World From Crisis to Revolution The Liberal Revolution Rise and Fall of the Radical Revolution The First Empire Chapter 2: Restoration, Revolution, and Empire: France, 1815-1852 Life in Early Nineteenth Century France The Restoration The Struggle for Liberty The Restoration and France Overseas The Revolution of 1830 Industrial Revolution Winners and Losers: The New Industrial Society The July Monarchy Beyond Liberty? New Paths to Reform and Revolution The Revolutions of 1848 From Republic to Empire Chapter 3: Imperial Democracy? France under the Second Empire, 1852-1870 Europe and the World in the Mid-Nineteenth Century The Authoritarian Empire France Confronts a Changing World New Visions of Empire The Liberal Empire The Franco-Prussian War and the Fall of the Empire Chapter 4 Paris: The Making of a World Capital The Rise of World Cities The Haussmannization of Paris Paris and the Cultures of Modernity The Franco-Prussian War and the Siege of Paris The Paris Commune Paris, World Capital of Consumer Culture Montmarte and the Rise of a New Bohemia Paris on Display to the World Chapter 5: The Universal Republic Global Change: The Second Industrial Revolution and the Rise of Mass Society Universalism and the Third Republic The "Republicanization" of the Republic The Republicanization of France The Republic in Danger The Dreyfus Affair The Radical Republic Chapter 6: The Republican Empire The New Imperialism Jules Ferry le tonkinois and the New French Empire France and the Scramble for Africa The Old Colonies and the New Empire Ideas and Realities of Empire France in the Colonies The Colonies in France Chapter 7: The Universal Nation in a World at War France, Europe, and the World Face a New Century France in the Belle Epoque The Road to War France Goes to War France Adjusts to War Battle and Survival in the Trenches The Empire Goes to War The Crises of 1917 The Final Year of the War Chapter 8: From One War to Another: The Universal Nation in Crisis The Peace of Paris and the Versailles Treaty Prosperity and Anxiety in the Interwar Years Interwar Politics and Diplomacy The Crazy Years: New Dimensions in Avant-Garde and Popular Culture One Hundred Million Frenchmen: Imperial France between the Wars France and the World Depression Foreign Affairs and the End of the Peace Chapter 9: France in World War II: Defeat and Rebirth of the Universal Nation Phoney War and Collapse Vichy and the National Revolution Vichy, Germany, and the Jews Empire by Association: Vichy and the Colonies Life in Wartime France The Resistance and the Decline of Vichy Liberation Chapter 10: The Fourth Republic: New Challenges for the Transnational Nation From the Liberation to the Fourth Republic Cold War and Coca-Colonization: France between Superpowers Building a New France The Revolt against Empire Building a New France The Revolt against Empire The Algerian War and the End of the Fourth Republic Chapter 11: The Fifth Republic: A New Era for France Building the Fifth Republic La Gloire: de Gaulle, France, and the World Prosperity and Consumer Society Revolution in France? The End of Postwar Prosperity The Socialists Take Power Chapter 12: Postcolonial France: A New Universal Nation? The New Globalism and the End of the "Short" Twentieth Century The Rose Revolution: Achievements and Discontents Immigration and Race at the end of the Twentieth Century Memories and Legacies of War France, Europe, and the World at the End of the Twentieth Century France Enters a New Millennium Thunder on the Right.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813348117 20160618
In this compelling volume, Tyler Stovall takes a transnational approach to the history of modern France, and by doing so draws the reader into a key aspect of France's political culture: universalism. Beginning with the French Revolution and its aftermath, Stovall traces the definitive establishment of universal manhood suffrage and the abolition of slavery in 1848. Following this critical time in France's history, Stovall then explores the growth of urban and industrial society, the beginnings of mass immigration, and the creation of a new, republican Empire. This time period gives way to the history of the two world wars, the rise of political movements like Communism and Fascism, and new directions in popular culture. The text concludes with the history of France during the Fourth and Fifth republics, concentrating on decolonization and the rise of postcolonial society and culture. Throughout these major historical events Stovall examines France's relations with three other areas of the world: Europe, the United States, and France's colonial empire, which includes a wealth of recent historical studies. By exploring these three areas--and their political, social, and cultural relations with France--the text will provide new insights into both the nature of French identity and the making of the modern world in general.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813348117 20160618
Green Library
FEMGEN-37S-01, FRENCH-157-01, HISTORY-37S-01
Book
324 pages.
  • Civilizing "French Muslims from Algeria"
  • Instructing the experts : framing the metropolitan "conquest of hearts"
  • Instructing a "difficult and delicate clientele" : the social services mission
  • From dormitories to homes : housing workers and families during the Fourth Republic
  • Services and surveillance : welfare, the police, and the Algerian War
  • The great "hope" : housing Algerian families at the height of the Algerian War.
France, which has the largest Muslim minority community in Europe, has been in the news in recent years because of perceptions that Muslims have not integrated into French society. The Civilizing Mission in the Metropole explores the roots of these debates through an examination of the history of social welfare programs for Algerian migrants from the end of World War II until Algeria gained independence in 1962. After its colonization in 1830, Algeria fought a bloody war of decolonization against France, as France desperately fought to maintain control over its most prized imperial possession. In the midst of this violence, some 350,000 Algerians settled in France. This study examines the complex and often-contradictory goals of a welfare network that sought to provide services and monitor Algerian migrants' activities. Lyons particularly highlights family settlement and the central place Algerian women held in French efforts to transform the settled community. Lyons questions myths about Algerian immigration history and exposes numerous paradoxes surrounding the fraught relationship between France and Algeria - many of which echo in French debates about Muslims today.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804784214 20160612
Green Library
FEMGEN-37S-01, FRENCH-157-01, HISTORY-37S-01
Book
xii, 351 pages : illustrations, map ; 24 cm
  • Romance. Soldier, liberator, tourist
  • The myth of the manly GI
  • Masters in their house
  • Prostitution. Amerilots and harlots
  • The silver foxhole
  • Dangerous indiscretions
  • Rape. The innocent suffer
  • Black terror on the bocage
  • Conclusion : two victory days.
How do you convince men to charge across heavily mined beaches into deadly machine-gun fire? Do you appeal to their bonds with their fellow soldiers, their patriotism, their desire to end tyranny and mass murder? Certainly - but if you're the US Army in 1944, you also try another tack: you dangle the lure of beautiful French women, waiting just on the other side of the wire, ready to reward their liberators in oh so many ways. That's not the picture of the Greatest Generation that we've been given, but it's the one Mary Louise Roberts paints to devastating effect in "What Soldiers Do". Drawing on an incredible range of sources, including news reports, propaganda, training materials, official planning documents, wartime diaries, and memoirs, Roberts tells the fascinating and troubling story of how the US military command systematically spread - and then exploited - the myth of French women as sexually experienced and available. The resulting chaos - ranging from flagrant public sex with prostitutes to outright rape and rampant venereal disease - horrified the war-weary and demoralized French population. The sexual predation, and the blithe response of the American military leadership, also caused serious friction between the two nations just as they were attempting to settle questions of long-term control over the liberated territories and the restoration of French sovereignty. While never denying the achievement of D-day, or the bravery of the soldiers who took part, "What Soldiers Do" reminds us that history is always more useful - and more interesting - when it is more honest, and when it goes beyond the burnished beauty of nostalgia to grapple with the real experiences and real mistakes of the people who lived it.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226923093 20160611
What Soldiers Do presents a devastating new perspective on the Greatest Generation and the liberation of France, one in which the US military use the lure of easy, sexually available French women to sell soldiers on the invasion, thus unleashing a "tsunami of male lust" among the war-weary GIs. The resulting chaos-ranging from flagrant public sex with prostitutes to outright rape and rampant venereal disease - horrified the battered and demoralized French population and caused serious friction between the two nations at a crucial point as the war drew to a close.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226923116 20160611
Green Library
FEMGEN-37S-01, FRENCH-157-01, HISTORY-37S-01
Book
xv, 445 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
  • List of Illustrations and Maps Acknowledgments List of Abbreviations Note on Transliteration Introduction: Peoplings 1. Arrival: Tunis the Well-Protected" 2. Detours: Migrations in a Mobile World 3. Making a Living: Domestic Service and Other Forms of Employment 4. Making a Living: Petty Commerce, Places of Sociability, and the Down-and-Out 5. Making a Living: The Sea, Contraband, and Other Illicit Activities 6. From Protection to Protectorate: Justice, Order, and Legal Pluralism 7. Muslim Princes and Trans-Mediterranean Missionaries 8. Where Elites Meet: Households, Harim Visits, and Sea Bathing 9. Khayr al-Din al-Tunisi and a Mediterranean Community of Thought Epilogue: Fetched Up on the Maghrib's Shores Notes Glossary Select Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520259232 20160604
Today labor migrants mostly move south to north across the Mediterranean. Yet in the nineteenth century thousands of Europeans and others moved south to North Africa, Egypt, and the Levant. This study of a dynamic borderland, the Tunis region, offers the fullest picture to date of the Mediterranean before, and during, French colonialism. In a vibrant examination of people in motion, Julia A. Clancy-Smith tells the story of countless migrants, travelers, and adventurers who traversed the Mediterranean, changing it forever. Who were they? Why did they leave home? What awaited them in North Africa?And most importantly, how did an Arab-Muslim state and society make room for the newcomers? Combining fleeting facts, tales of success and failure, and vivid cameos, the book gives a groundbreaking view of one of the principal ways that the Mediterranean became modern.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520259232 20160604
Green Library
FEMGEN-37S-01, FRENCH-157-01, HISTORY-37S-01
Book
416 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction /Marilyn Booth I. Normative Images and Shifting Spaces 1. Early Women Exemplars and the Construction of Gendered Space: (Re-)Defining Feminine Moral Excellence / Asma Afsaruddin-- 2. Normative Notions of Public and Private in Early Islamic Culture / Yaseen Noorani-- 3. The Harem as Gendered Space and the Spatial Reproduction of Gender / Irvin Cemil Schick II. Rooms and Thresholds: Harems as Spaces, Socialities, and Law 4. Caliphal Harems, Household Harems: Baghdad in the Fourth Century of the Islamic Era / Nadia Maria El Cheikh-- 5. Domesticating Sexuality: Harem Culture in Ottoman Imperial Law / Leslie Peirce-- 6. Panoptic Bodies: Black Eunuchs as Guardians of the Topkapi Harem /Jateen Lad-- 7. Where Elites Meet: Harem Visits, Sea Bathing, and Sociabilities in Precolonial Tunisia, c. 1800-1881 / Julia Clancy-Smith-- 8. The Harem as Biography: Domestic Architecture, Gender, and Nostalgia in Modern Syria / Heghnar Zeitlian Watenpaugh III. Harems Envisioned 9. Harem/House/Set: Domestic Interiors in Photography from the Late Ottoman World / Nancy Micklewright-- 10. Dress and Undress: Clothing and Eroticism in Nineteenth-Century Visual Representations of the Harem / Joan DelPlato-- 11. Harems, Women, and Political Tyranny in the Works of Jurji Zaydan / Orit Bashkin-- 12. The Harem as the Seat of Middle-class Industry and Morality: The Fiction of Ahmet Midhat Efendi / Holly Shissler-- 13. Between Harem and Houseboat: "Fallenness, " Gendered Spaces, and the Female National Subject in 1920s Egypt / Marilyn Booth Bibliography-- Contributors-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780822348696 20160606
Harem Histories is an interdisciplinary collection of essays exploring the harem as it was imagined, represented, and experienced in Middle Eastern and North African societies, while also attending to its representational and political uses by visitors to those societies. One theme that threads through the collection is the intimate interrelatedness of West and East through encounters in and around the harem, whether in the elite socializing of pre-colonial Tunis or in popular historical novels published in Istanbul and Cairo from the late nineteenth century onward. Several of the contributors focus on European culture as a repository of harem representations, but most of them tackle indigenous representations of home spaces and their significance for how the bodies of men and women, and girls and boys, were distributed in social space, from early Islamic Mecca to early twentieth-century Cairo. Contributors: Asma Afsaruddin; Orit Bashkin; Marilyn Booth; Nadia Maria El Cheikh; Julia Clancy-Smith; Joan DelPlato; Jateen Lad; Nancy Micklewright; Yaseen Noorani; Leslie Peirce; Irvin Cemil Schick; A. Holly Schissler; Heghnar Zeitlian Watenpaugh.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780822348696 20160606
Green Library
FEMGEN-37S-01, FRENCH-157-01, HISTORY-37S-01
Book
392 p. ; 23 cm.
'If a woman loves you, Younes, if she truly loves you, and if you have the wisdom to appreciate this great privilege, then there is no god to touch you'. As a young man Younes' life is irrevocably changed when he leaves his broken home for the vibrant, colourful and affluent European district of Rio Salado. Renamed Jonas, he begins a new life and forges a unique friendship with a group of boys, an enduring bond that nothing - not even the Algerian Revolt - will shake. Yet with the return to Rio Salado of Emilie - a beautiful, beguiling young girl who captures the hearts of all who see her - an epic love story is set in motion that will challenge the complicity of these four boys and force Jonas to confront the burden of having to choose between two worlds: Algerian or European; loyalty or selfishness; past or present; surrendering to fate or grasping control of his own destiny. In "What The Day Owes The Night", Yasmina Khadra has written a majestic novel of colonial Algeria, a turbulent, passionate, heart-rending country. Set against the war of independence and a harsh yet mystic landscape, Khadra's dazzling prose and consummate compassion illuminate the terrible rift between lovers, family and friends who love the same country.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780434019939 20160604
Green Library
FEMGEN-37S-01, FRENCH-157-01, HISTORY-37S-01
Book
66 p. ; 26 cm.
Green Library
FEMGEN-37S-01, FRENCH-157-01, HISTORY-37S-01
Book
233 p. ; 22 cm.
Green Library
FEMGEN-37S-01, FRENCH-157-01, HISTORY-37S-01
Book
xxxiv, 153 p. ; 23 cm.
Like the autobiographical hero of this, his classic first novel, Mouloud Feraoun grew up in the rugged Kabyle region of French-controlled Algeria, where the prospects for most Muslim Berber men were limited to shepherding or emigrating to France for factory work. While Feraoun escaped such a fate by excelling in the colonial school system -- as a student and, later, as a teacher at the Ecole Normale -- he remained firmly rooted in Kabyle culture. This dual perspective only enhanced his view, often brutally, of the ravages on his country by poverty, colonial rule, and a world war that descended on Algeria like a great storm. This embattled society, and Feraoun's unique position within it, became the raw material for The Poor Man's Son. Originally published in 1950, the novel was reissued in 1954, when its style was "fixed" to remove colloquial mannerisms and tenses. Perhaps more importantly, an entire section was omitted, significantly altering the conclusion and, indeed, the whole thrust of the book. Nonetheless, it is this version by which the book is known to this day in French. Based on the original 1950 text, this new translation is notable not only for bringing Feraoun's classic to an English-speaking audience but also for presenting the book in its entirety for the first time in fifty years. A direct response to Albert Camus' call for Algerians to tell the world their story, The Poor Man's Son remains after half a century the definitive map of the Kabyle soul.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813923253 20160528
Green Library
FEMGEN-37S-01, FRENCH-157-01, HISTORY-37S-01
Book
92 p. ; 20 cm.
Green Library
FEMGEN-37S-01, FRENCH-157-01, HISTORY-37S-01

13. The lover [1997]

Book
117 p. ; 21 cm.
Back in print in hardcover, this international bestseller has been acclaimed by critics all over the world. Set in the prewar Indochina of Marguerite Duras' childhood, "The Lover" tells haunting tale of a tumultuous affair between an adolescent French girl and her Chinese lover in the waning days of France's colonial empire.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780375400858 20160527
Green Library
FEMGEN-37S-01, FRENCH-157-01, HISTORY-37S-01
Book
xiv, 158 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
  • Introduction-- l. Foundations-- 2. Telling places: the house as social architecture-- 3. Telling people: the house and the world-- 4. Domestic time-- 5. The poetics of remembrance.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521418911 20160528
Recalling how they lived in a single house that was occupied by several Jewish and Muslim families, in the generation before Algerian independence, Joelle Bahloul's informants build up a multivocal micro-history of a way of life which came to an end in the early 1960s. Uprooted and dispersed, these former neighbours constantly refer back to the architecture of the house itself, which, with its internal boundaries and shared spaces, structures their memories. Here, in miniature, is a domestic history of North African Muslims, Jews, and Christians living under French colonial rule.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521418911 20160528
Green Library
CSRE-249-01, FEMGEN-37S-01, FRENCH-157-01, FRENCH-249-01, HISTORY-239G-01, HISTORY-37S-01, JEWISHST-249-01
Book
159 p.
Green Library
FEMGEN-37S-01, FRENCH-157-01, HISTORY-37S-01

16. So long a letter [1989]

Book
90 p. ; 19 cm.
This novel is in the form of a letter, written by the widowed Ramatoulaye and describing her struggle for survival. It is the winner of the Noma Award.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780435905552 20160527
Green Library
FEMGEN-37S-01, FRENCH-157-01, HISTORY-37S-01

17. Scarlet song [1985]

Book
iv, 171 p. ; 20 cm.
Green Library
FEMGEN-37S-01, FRENCH-157-01, HISTORY-37S-01

18. Black skin, white masks [1968 - ]

Book
232 p. ; 18 cm.
Green Library, SAL3 (off-campus storage)
FEMGEN-37S-01, FRENCH-157-01, HISTORY-37S-01

19. The sea wall [1967]

Book
xiv, 288 p. 21 cm.
Green Library
FEMGEN-37S-01, FRENCH-157-01, HISTORY-37S-01