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Book
248 pages ; 23 cm
  • Acknowledgements. Foreword by Judith Gould. Preface. Introduction. 1. Women get Autism Too - Gender Differences in Autism: Research Review. 2. Considering ASD in Females - Getting a Diagnosis. 3. Infancy and Childhood. 4. Childhood Relationships - Friends and Other People. 5. Adolescence. 6. Education - Early Years, School and Beyond. 7. Discovering Autism as an Adult. 8. You Don't Look Autistic - Adult Characteristics and Looking 'Normal'. 9. Adult Relationships - Friends and Other People 10. Sexuality and Gender Identity 11. Personal Relationships. 12. Pregnancy and Parenting. 13. Health and Well-being. 14. Employment. 15. Ageing with Autism. 16. Ideal World - Support, Services and Utopia. References.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781849055475 20170306
The difference that being female makes to the diagnosis, life and experiences of a person with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) has largely gone unresearched and unreported until recently. In this book Sarah Hendrickx has collected both academic research and personal stories about girls and women on the autism spectrum to present a picture of their feelings, thoughts and experiences at each stage of their lives. Outlining how autism presents differently and can hide itself in females and what the likely impact will be for them throughout their lifespan, the book looks at how females with ASD experience diagnosis, childhood, education, adolescence, friendships, sexuality, employment, pregnancy and parenting, and aging. It will provide invaluable guidance for the professionals who support these girls and women and it will offer women with autism a guiding light in interpreting and understanding their own life experiences through the experiences of others.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781849055475 20170306
Green Library
AMSTUD-260-01, FEMGEN-260-01, FEMGEN-360-01
Book
223 p. ; 20 cm.
Dr Kay Redfield Jamison is one of the foremost authorities on manic-depressive illness. She has also experienced it first-hand. For even while she was pursuing her career in academic medicine, she was affected by the same exhilarating highs and catastrophic depressions that afflicted many of her patients. An "Unquiet Mind" is a memoir of enormous candour, courage, wit and wisdom, which examines manic depression from the dual perspectives of the healer and the healed, revealing both its terrors and its cruel allure. First published fifteen years ago, it remains the definitive book on manic depression. "It stands alone in the literature of manic depression for its bravery, brilliance and beauty" (Oliver Sacks). "Affecting, honest, touching". (Will Self).
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780330528078 20160614
Green Library
AMSTUD-260-01, FEMGEN-260-01, FEMGEN-360-01
Book
255 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.
Green Library
AMSTUD-260-01, FEMGEN-260-01, FEMGEN-360-01
Book
143 p. ; 23 cm.
  • Girl, interrupted
  • Thinking and writing about myself
  • In the family way
  • It's time!
  • Inaccessibility
  • Music and joyful embodied experiences
  • Becoming a living text.
Heather Kuttai is a 40-year-old white woman. She is married & is the mother of two children. However, her life is not as conventional as it first appears: Heather is a paraplegic. Heather's experiences as a woman with a disability experiencing pregnancy & childbirth offers insights into what is already known about women's bodies.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781552663424 20160615
Green Library
AMSTUD-260-01, FEMGEN-260-01, FEMGEN-360-01
Book
xii, 205 p. ; 24 cm.
Traveling Blind is a romance, a travel adventure, an emotional quest, and a deeply reflective description of coming to terms with lack of sight. It reveals the invisible work of navigating with a guide dog while learning to perceive the world in new ways. Although an intensely personal account, Traveling Blind is not simply memoir, for it extends beyond one person's experience to illuminate our understandings of vision informed by the academic fields of disability studies, feminist ethnography, and the study of human-animal bonds. What does it mean to "travel blind"? What is it like to live in a world where things are not black and white so much as shades of gray? How does it feel to navigate through constantly changing imagery that requires changing inner perspectives as well? What can experiences of blindness tell us about sight? The book confronts these questions and more. In a series of beautifully textured stories, the author takes the reader on a fascinating journey as she travels with Teela, her lively ""golden dog, " through airports, city streets, and southwest desert landscapes, exploring these surroundings with changed sight. This unusual account of travel will inspire the sighted as well as the blind, offering pointed observations on processes of learning to work with a service animal and on coming to terms with a disability. In remarkably visual detail, Krieger makes palpable an ambiguous world. Repeatedly confronted with social stereotypes (that she should be totally blind and incapable of mobility), she comes to value her own unique ways of seeing and her interdependence with both her animal and human companions. Her descriptions of exquisite natural landscapes and intimate personal moments will touch as well as educate readers.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781557535573 20160604
Green Library
AMSTUD-260-01, FEMGEN-260-01, FEMGEN-360-01

6. Long time, no see [2003]

Book
204 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
  • My two companions
  • Braille jail
  • Blind Christmas
  • Gus
  • Another sort of trouble
  • Pandora
  • Adventures with Gus
  • How I do it
  • Looking for work.
"Long Time, No See" is certainly an inspiring story, but Beth Finke does not aim to inspire. Eschewing reassuring platitudes and sensational pleas for sympathy, she charts her struggles with juvenile diabetes, blindness, and a host of other hardships, sharing her feelings of despair and frustration as well as her hard-won triumphs. Rejecting the label "courageous, " she prefers to describe herself using the phrase her mother invoked in times of difficulty, "She did what she had to do". With unflinching candor and acerbic wit, Finke chronicles the progress of the juvenile diabetes that left her blind at the age of twenty-six as well as the seemingly endless spiral of adversity that followed. First she was forced out of her professional job. Then she bore a multiply handicapped son. But she kept moving forward, confronting marital and financial problems and persevering through a rocky training period with a seeing-eye dog. Finke's life story and her commanding knowledge of her situation give readers a clear understanding of diabetes, blindness, and the issues faced by parents of children with significant disabilities. Because she has taken care to include accurate medical information as well as personal memoir, "Long Time, No See" serves as an excellent resource for others in similar situations and for professionals who deal with disabled adults or children.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780252028274 20160528
Green Library
AMSTUD-260-01, FEMGEN-260-01, FEMGEN-360-01

7. An unquiet mind [1995]

Book
223 p. ; 22 cm.
Green Library
AMSTUD-260-01, FEMGEN-260-01, FEMGEN-360-01