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Book
xv, 462 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 23 cm.
  • Part I: Research and writing. What research is and how researchers think about it
  • Defining a project: topic, question, problem, working hypothesis
  • Finding useful sources
  • Engaging your sources
  • Constructing your argument
  • Planning a first draft
  • Drafting your paper
  • Presenting evidence in tables and figures
  • Revising your draft
  • Writing your final introduction and conclusion
  • Revising sentences
  • Learning from comments on your paper
  • Presenting research in alternative forums
  • On the spirit of research
  • Source citation. General introduction to citation practices
  • Notes-bibliography style: the basic form
  • Notes-bibliography style: citing specific types of sources
  • Author-date style: the basic form
  • Author-date style: citing specific types of sources
  • Part III: Style. Spelling
  • Punctuation
  • Names, special terms, and titles of works
  • Numbers
  • Abbreviations
  • Quotations
  • Tables and figures
  • Appendix: paper format and submission.
When Kate L. Turabian first put her famous guidelines to paper, she could hardly have imagined the world in which today's students would be conducting research. Yet while the ways in which we research and compose papers may have changed, the fundamentals remain the same: writers need to have a strong research question, construct an evidence-based argument, cite their sources, and structure their work in a logical way. A Manual for Writers of Research Papers, Theses, and Dissertations--also known as "Turabian"--remains one of the most popular books for writers because of its timeless focus on achieving these goals. This new edition filters decades of expertise into modern standards. While previous editions incorporated digital forms of research and writing, this edition goes even further to build information literacy, recognizing that most students will be doing their work largely or entirely online and on screens. Chapters include updated advice on finding, evaluating, and citing a wide range of digital sources and also recognize the evolving use of software for citation management, graphics, and paper format and submission. The ninth edition is fully aligned with the recently released Chicago Manual of Style, 17th edition, as well as with the latest edition of The Craft of Research. Teachers and users of the previous editions will recognize the familiar three-part structure. Part 1 covers every step of the research and writing process, including drafting and revising. Part 2 offers a comprehensive guide to Chicago's two methods of source citation: notes-bibliography and author-date. Part 3 gets into matters of editorial style and the correct way to present quotations and visual material. A Manual for Writers also covers an issue familiar to writers of all levels: how to conquer the fear of tackling a major writing project. Through eight decades and millions of copies, A Manual for Writers has helped generations shape their ideas into compelling research papers. This new edition will continue to be the gold standard for college and graduate students in virtually all academic disciplines.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226494425 20180416
Green Library, Education Library (Cubberley), Music Library
ESF-15-04
Book
x, 246 pages ; 22 cm
  • Style as choice
  • Understanding style
  • Correctness
  • Clarity
  • Actions
  • Characters
  • Cohesion and coherence
  • Emphasis
  • Clarity of form
  • Motivation
  • Global coherence
  • Grace
  • Concision
  • Shape --Elegance
  • Ethics
  • The ethics of style.
Green Library
ESF-15-04
Book
xi, 340 pages : chiefly illustrations (some color) ; 24 cm
  • Introduction: spaces for writing
  • Why rhetoric?
  • Strategic reading
  • Writing identities
  • Argument beyond pro and con
  • Composing together
  • Research: more than detective work
  • Rethinking revision
  • Going public.
Encourages deep engagement with core concepts of writing and rhetoric, as teachers and students alike have told us. With a new chapter on collaboration, unique coverage of writerly identity, and extensive discussions of rhetoric, reading, argument, research, revision, and presenting work to audiences, the one and only composition comic covers what students need to know--and does so with fun and flair.
Green Library
ESF-15-04
Book
275 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
  • 1. The Top Twenty: A Quick Guide to Troubleshooting Your Writing.- 2. Expectations for College Writing.- 3. Writing Situations.- 4. Exploring Ideas.- 5. Planning and Drafting.- 6. Developing Paragraphs.- 7. Reviewing, Revising, and Editing.- 8. Reflecting.- 9. Critical Reading.- 10. Analyzing Arguments.- 11. Constructing Arguments.- 12. Preparing for a Research Project.- 13. Doing Research.- 14. Evaluating Sources and Taking Notes.- 15. Integrating Sources and Avoiding Plagiarism.- 16. Writing a Research Project.- 17. Academic Work in Any Discipline.- 18. Writing for the Humanities.- 19. Writing for the Social Sciences.- 20. Writing for the Natural and Applied Sciences.- 21. Writing for Business.- 22. Making Design Decisions.- 23. Creating Presentations.- 24. Communicating in Other Media.- 25. Writing to Make Something Happen in the World.- 26. Writing to the World.- 27. Language That Builds Common Ground.- 28. Language Variety.- 29. Word Choice and Spelling.- 30. Coordination, Subordination, and Emphasis.- 31. Consistency and Completeness.- 32. Parallelism.- 33. Shifts.- 34. Conciseness.- 35. Sentence Variety.- 36. Parts of Speech.- 37. Parts of Sentences.- 38. Verbs and Verb Phrases.- 39. Nouns and Noun Phrases.- 40. Subject-Verb Agreement.- 41. Pronouns.- 42. Adjectives and Adverbs.- 43. Modifier Placement.- 44. Prepositions and Prepositional Phrases.- 45. Comma Splices and Fused Sentences.- 46. Sentence Fragments.- 47. Commas.- 48. Semicolons.- 49. End Punctuation.- 50. Apostrophes.- 51. Quotation Marks.- 52. Other Punctuation Marks.- 53. Capital Letters.- 54. Abbreviations and Numbers.- 55. Italics.- 56. Hyphens.- 57. The basics of MLA style.- 58. MLA Style for In-Text Citations.- 59. MLA Style for a List of Works Cited.- 60. A Student Research Essay, MLA style.- 61. The basics of APA Style.- 62. APA style for in-text citations.- 63. APA style for a list of references.- 64. A student research essay, APA style.- 65. The basics of Chicago style.- 66. Chicago style for notes and bibliographic entries.- 67. A student research essay, Chicago style.- Glossary of usage.- Index with glossary of terms.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781319083458 20180508
  • Writing Processes1. The Top Twenty: A Quick Guide to Troubleshooting Your Writing.- 2. Expectations for College Writing.- 3. Writing Situations.- 4. Exploring Ideas.- 5. Planning and Drafting.- 6. Developing Paragraphs.- 7. Reviewing, Revising, and Editing.- 8. Reflecting.- Critical Thinking and Argument9. Critical Reading.- 10. Analyzing Arguments.- 11. Constructing Arguments.- Research12. Preparing for a Research Project.- 13. Doing Research.- 14. Evaluating Sources and Taking Notes.- 15. Integrating Sources and Avoiding Plagiarism.- 16. Writing a Research Project.- Academic, Professional, and Public Writing.- 17. Academic Work in Any Discipline.- 18. Writing for the Humanities.- 19. Writing for the Social Sciences.- 20. Writing for the Natural and Applied Sciences.- 21. Writing for Business.- 22. Making Design Decisions.- 23. Creating Presentations.- 24. Communicating in Other Media.- 25. Writing to Make Something Happen in the World.- Language 26. Writing to the World.- 27. Language That Builds Common Ground.- 28. Language Variety.- 29. Word Choice and Spelling.- Style30. Coordination, Subordination, and Emphasis.- 31. Consistency and Completeness.- 32. Parallelism.- 33. Shifts.- 34. Conciseness.- 35. Sentence Variety.- Sentence Grammar.- 36. Parts of Speech.- 37. Parts of Sentences.- 38. Verbs and Verb Phrases.- 39. Nouns and Noun Phrases.- 40. Subject-Verb Agreement.- 41. Pronouns.- 42. Adjectives and Adverbs.- 43. Modifier Placement.- 44. Prepositions and Prepositional Phrases.- 45. Comma Splices and Fused Sentences.- 46. Sentence Fragments.- Punctuation and Mechanics47. Commas.- 48. Semicolons.- 49. End Punctuation.- 50. Apostrophes.- 51. Quotation Marks.- 52. Other Punctuation Marks.- 53. Capital Letters.- 54. Abbreviations and Numbers.- 55. Italics.- 56. Hyphens.- MLA Documentation57. The basics of MLA style.- 58. MLA Style for In-Text Citations.- 59. MLA Style for a List of Works Cited.- 60. A Student Research Essay, MLA style.- APA Documentation61. The basics of APA Style.- 62. APA style for in-text citations.- 63. APA style for a list of references.- 64. A student research essay, APA style.- Chicago Documentation65. The basics of Chicago style.- 66. Chicago style for notes and bibliographic entries.- 67. A student research essay, Chicago style.- Glossaries and IndexGlossary of usage.- Index with glossary of terms.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781457698477 20180508
Contexts for writing keep changing, and Andrea Lunsford knows that every writer needs to engage with audiences and communicate ideas every day. The Everyday Writer shows novice writers how to navigate rhetorical situations and make effective choices everywhere they write. The illustrations, by Eisner Award nominee GB Tran, offer a high-interest approach to writing processes and encourage students to open and use their handbook. And Andrea's friendly voice is always front and center, ready to answer any question. With new and expanded coverage of presentations and multimodal projects, integrated advice for writers from all language and educational backgrounds, and help learning the moves that make expert writers credible, The Everyday Writer is the encouraging guide students need to take their writing to the next level.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781457698477 20180508
This accessible handbook for novice writers advises on how to navigate rhetorical situations and make effective choices in every context, to engage with audiences and communicate ideas. Illustrations offer a high-interest approach to writing processes and encourage students to open and use their handbook. With new and expanded coverage of presentations and multimodal projects, integrated advice for writers from all language and educational backgrounds, and help learning the moves that make expert writers credible, this is the encouraging guide students need to take their writing to the next level. Updated to reflect the updates in The MLA Handbook, 8th edition.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781319083458 20180508
Green Library
ESF-15-04
Book
xxiv, 667 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
  • 1. The Top Twenty: A Quick Guide to Troubleshooting Your Writing.- 2. Expectations for College Writing.- 3. Writing Situations.- 4. Exploring Ideas.- 5. Planning and Drafting.- 6. Developing Paragraphs.- 7. Reviewing, Revising, and Editing.- 8. Reflecting.- 9. Critical Reading.- 10. Analyzing Arguments.- 11. Constructing Arguments.- 12. Preparing for a Research Project.- 13. Doing Research.- 14. Evaluating Sources and Taking Notes.- 15. Integrating Sources and Avoiding Plagiarism.- 16. Writing a Research Project.- 17. Academic Work in Any Discipline.- 18. Writing for the Humanities.- 19. Writing for the Social Sciences.- 20. Writing for the Natural and Applied Sciences.- 21. Writing for Business.- 22. Making Design Decisions.- 23. Creating Presentations.- 24. Communicating in Other Media.- 25. Writing to Make Something Happen in the World.- 26. Writing to the World.- 27. Language That Builds Common Ground.- 28. Language Variety.- 29. Word Choice and Spelling.- 30. Coordination, Subordination, and Emphasis.- 31. Consistency and Completeness.- 32. Parallelism.- 33. Shifts.- 34. Conciseness.- 35. Sentence Variety.- 36. Parts of Speech.- 37. Parts of Sentences.- 38. Verbs and Verb Phrases.- 39. Nouns and Noun Phrases.- 40. Subject-Verb Agreement.- 41. Pronouns.- 42. Adjectives and Adverbs.- 43. Modifier Placement.- 44. Prepositions and Prepositional Phrases.- 45. Comma Splices and Fused Sentences.- 46. Sentence Fragments.- 47. Commas.- 48. Semicolons.- 49. End Punctuation.- 50. Apostrophes.- 51. Quotation Marks.- 52. Other Punctuation Marks.- 53. Capital Letters.- 54. Abbreviations and Numbers.- 55. Italics.- 56. Hyphens.- 57. The basics of MLA style.- 58. MLA Style for In-Text Citations.- 59. MLA Style for a List of Works Cited.- 60. A Student Research Essay, MLA style.- 61. The basics of APA Style.- 62. APA style for in-text citations.- 63. APA style for a list of references.- 64. A student research essay, APA style.- 65. The basics of Chicago style.- 66. Chicago style for notes and bibliographic entries.- 67. A student research essay, Chicago style.- Glossary of usage.- Index with glossary of terms.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781319083458 20180903
  • Writing Processes1. The Top Twenty: A Quick Guide to Troubleshooting Your Writing.- 2. Expectations for College Writing.- 3. Writing Situations.- 4. Exploring Ideas.- 5. Planning and Drafting.- 6. Developing Paragraphs.- 7. Reviewing, Revising, and Editing.- 8. Reflecting.- Critical Thinking and Argument9. Critical Reading.- 10. Analyzing Arguments.- 11. Constructing Arguments.- Research12. Preparing for a Research Project.- 13. Doing Research.- 14. Evaluating Sources and Taking Notes.- 15. Integrating Sources and Avoiding Plagiarism.- 16. Writing a Research Project.- Academic, Professional, and Public Writing.- 17. Academic Work in Any Discipline.- 18. Writing for the Humanities.- 19. Writing for the Social Sciences.- 20. Writing for the Natural and Applied Sciences.- 21. Writing for Business.- 22. Making Design Decisions.- 23. Creating Presentations.- 24. Communicating in Other Media.- 25. Writing to Make Something Happen in the World.- Language 26. Writing to the World.- 27. Language That Builds Common Ground.- 28. Language Variety.- 29. Word Choice and Spelling.- Style30. Coordination, Subordination, and Emphasis.- 31. Consistency and Completeness.- 32. Parallelism.- 33. Shifts.- 34. Conciseness.- 35. Sentence Variety.- Sentence Grammar.- 36. Parts of Speech.- 37. Parts of Sentences.- 38. Verbs and Verb Phrases.- 39. Nouns and Noun Phrases.- 40. Subject-Verb Agreement.- 41. Pronouns.- 42. Adjectives and Adverbs.- 43. Modifier Placement.- 44. Prepositions and Prepositional Phrases.- 45. Comma Splices and Fused Sentences.- 46. Sentence Fragments.- Punctuation and Mechanics47. Commas.- 48. Semicolons.- 49. End Punctuation.- 50. Apostrophes.- 51. Quotation Marks.- 52. Other Punctuation Marks.- 53. Capital Letters.- 54. Abbreviations and Numbers.- 55. Italics.- 56. Hyphens.- MLA Documentation57. The basics of MLA style.- 58. MLA Style for In-Text Citations.- 59. MLA Style for a List of Works Cited.- 60. A Student Research Essay, MLA style.- APA Documentation61. The basics of APA Style.- 62. APA style for in-text citations.- 63. APA style for a list of references.- 64. A student research essay, APA style.- Chicago Documentation65. The basics of Chicago style.- 66. Chicago style for notes and bibliographic entries.- 67. A student research essay, Chicago style.- Glossaries and IndexGlossary of usage.- Index with glossary of terms.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781457698477 20180903
Contexts for writing keep changing, and Andrea Lunsford knows that every writer needs to engage with audiences and communicate ideas every day. The Everyday Writer shows novice writers how to navigate rhetorical situations and make effective choices everywhere they write. The illustrations, by Eisner Award nominee GB Tran, offer a high-interest approach to writing processes and encourage students to open and use their handbook. And Andrea's friendly voice is always front and center, ready to answer any question. With new and expanded coverage of presentations and multimodal projects, integrated advice for writers from all language and educational backgrounds, and help learning the moves that make expert writers credible, The Everyday Writer is the encouraging guide students need to take their writing to the next level.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781457698477 20180903
This accessible handbook for novice writers advises on how to navigate rhetorical situations and make effective choices in every context, to engage with audiences and communicate ideas. Illustrations offer a high-interest approach to writing processes and encourage students to open and use their handbook. With new and expanded coverage of presentations and multimodal projects, integrated advice for writers from all language and educational backgrounds, and help learning the moves that make expert writers credible, this is the encouraging guide students need to take their writing to the next level. Updated to reflect the updates in The MLA Handbook, 8th edition.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781319083458 20180903
Green Library
ESF-15-04
Book
1 online resource (236 pages)
  • Note to the Fourth Edition x Note to the Third Edition xi Note to the Second Edition xii Introduction 1 1 Author and Audience 8 1 The Professor as Audience 8 2 The Student as Author 11 3 Three Attitudes about Philosophical Method 15 2 Logic and Argument for Writing 17 1 What is a Good Argument? 17 2 Valid Arguments 21 3 Cogent Arguments 31 4 Quantification and Modality 35 5 Consistency and Contradiction 40 6 Contraries and Contradictories 43 7 The Strength of a Proposition 46 3 The Structure of a Philosophical Essay 51 1 An Outline of the Structure of a Philosophical Essay 51 2 Anatomy of an Essay 57 3 Another Essay 63 4 Composing 67 1 How to Select an Essay Topic 68 2 Techniques for Composing 69 3 Outlining 70 4 The Rhetoric of Philosophical Writing 70 5 Successive Elaboration 72 6 Conceptual Note Taking 81 7 Research and Composing 83 8 Sentences and Paragraphs 84 9 Polishing 87 10 Evolution of an Essay 89 5 Tactics for Analytic Writing 101 1 Definitions 102 2 Distinctions 108 3 Analysis 111 4 Dilemmas 119 5 Scenarios 123 6 Counterexamples 125 7 Reductio ad Absurdum 132 8 Dialectical Reasoning 138 6 Some Constraints on Content 146 1 The Pursuit of Truth 146 2 The Use of Authority 147 3 The Burden of Proof 150 7 Some Goals of Form 152 1 Coherence 152 2 Clarity 156 3 Conciseness 162 4 Rigor 165 8 Problems with Introductions 168 1 Slip Sliding Away 168 2 The Tail Wagging the Dog 173 3 The Running Start 175 9 How to Read a Philosophical Work 181 1 Find the Thesis Sentence 181 2 Precision of Words, Phrases, and Sentences 185 3 Proving the Case 186 Appendix A: It s Sunday Night and I Have an Essay Due Monday Morning 190 Appendix B: How to Study for a Test 193 Appendix C: Research: Notes, Citations, and References 195 Appendix D: Philosophy Resources on the Internet, by Neil Sinhababu 201 Appendix E: On Grading 205 Appendix F: Glossary of Philosophical Terms 208 Index 218.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781119010036 20180530
Philosophical Writing: An Introduction, 4th Edition, features numerous updates and revisions to A. P. Martinich s best-selling text that instructs beginning philosophy students on how to craft a well-written philosophical essay. Features an entirely new chapter on how to read a philosophical essay, new sections on quantification and modality, and rhetoric in philosophical writing, as well as more updated essay examples Includes many new essay examples and an accompanying website with further topics and examples Traces the evolution of a good philosophical essay from draft stage to completion Emphasizes what a student should do in crafting an essay, rather than on what not to do Written with clarity and humor by a leading philosopher.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781119010036 20180530
eReserve
ESF-15-04
Book
204 pages ; 22 cm
  • Coming to America
  • A brief history of liberal education
  • Learning to think
  • The natural aristocracy
  • Knowledge and power
  • In defense of today's youth.
The liberal arts are under attack. The governors of Florida, Texas, and North Carolina have all pledged that they will not spend taxpayer money subsidizing the liberal arts, and they seem to have an unlikely ally in President Obama. While at a General Electric plant in early 2014, Obama remarked, "I promise you, folks can make a lot more, potentially, with skilled manufacturing or the trades than they might with an art history degree." These messages are hitting home: majors like English and history, once very popular and highly respected, are in steep decline. "I get it, " writes Fareed Zakaria, recalling the atmosphere in India where he grew up, which was even more obsessed with getting a skills-based education. However, the CNN host and best-selling author explains why this widely held view is mistaken and shortsighted. Zakaria eloquently expounds on the virtues of a liberal arts education-how to write clearly, how to express yourself convincingly, and how to think analytically. He turns our leaders' vocational argument on its head. American routine manufacturing jobs continue to get automated or outsourced, and specific vocational knowledge is often outdated within a few years. Engineering is a great profession, but key value-added skills you will also need are creativity, lateral thinking, design, communication, storytelling, and, more than anything, the ability to continually learn and enjoy learning-precisely the gifts of a liberal education. Zakaria argues that technology is transforming education, opening up access to the best courses and classes in a vast variety of subjects for millions around the world. We are at the dawn of the greatest expansion of the idea of a liberal education in human history.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780393247688 20160618
Green Library
ESF-15-04
Book
xii, 228 pages ; 22 cm
  • From taking in the world to transforming the self
  • Pragmatism : from autonomy to recognition
  • Controversies and critics
  • Reshaping ourselves and our societies.
Contentious debates over the benefits--or drawbacks--of a liberal education are as old as America itself. From Benjamin Franklin to the Internet pundits, critics of higher education have attacked its irrelevance and elitism--often calling for more vocational instruction. Thomas Jefferson, by contrast, believed that nurturing a student's capacity for lifelong learning was useful for science and commerce while also being essential for democracy. In this provocative contribution to the disputes, university president Michael S. Roth focuses on important moments and seminal thinkers in America's long-running argument over vocational vs. liberal education. Conflicting streams of thought flow through American intellectual history: W. E. B. DuBois's humanistic principles of pedagogy for newly emancipated slaves developed in opposition to Booker T. Washington's educational utilitarianism, for example. Jane Addams's emphasis on the cultivation of empathy and John Dewey's calls for education as civic engagement were rejected as impractical by those who aimed to train students for particular economic tasks. Roth explores these arguments (and more), considers the state of higher education today, and concludes with a stirring plea for the kind of education that has, since the founding of the nation, cultivated individual freedom, promulgated civic virtue, and instilled hope for the future.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780300175516 20160616
Green Library
ESF-15-04
Book
xiv, 229 p. ; 22 cm.
  • Preface xi Introduction 1 Chapter One: What Is College For? 9 Chapter Two: Origins 36 Chapter Three: From College to University 67 Chapter Four: Who Went? Who Goes? Who Pays? 102 Chapter Five: Brave New World 125 Chapter Six: What Is to Be Done? 150 Acknowledgments 179 Notes 183 Index 215.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691130736 20160614
As the commercialization of American higher education accelerates, more and more students are coming to college with the narrow aim of obtaining a preprofessional credential. The traditional four-year college experience - an exploratory time for students to discover their passions and test ideas and values with the help of teachers and peers - is in danger of becoming a thing of the past. In "College", prominent cultural critic Andrew Delbanco offers a trenchant defense of such an education, and warns that it is becoming a privilege reserved for the relatively rich. In arguing for what a true college education should be, he demonstrates why making it available to as many young people as possible remains central to America's democratic promise. In a brisk and vivid historical narrative, Delbanco explains how the idea of college arose in the colonial period from the Puritan idea of the gathered church, how it struggled to survive in the nineteenth century in the shadow of the new research universities, and how, in the twentieth century, it slowly opened its doors to women, minorities, and students from low-income families. He describes the unique strengths of America's colleges in our era of globalization and, while recognizing the growing centrality of science, technology, and vocational subjects in the curriculum, he mounts a vigorous defense of a broadly humanistic education for all. Acknowledging the serious financial, intellectual, and ethical challenges that all colleges face today, Delbanco considers what is at stake in the urgent effort to protect these venerable institutions for future generations.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691130736 20160614
Green Library
ESF-15-04
Book
viii, 312 p. : ill ; 22 cm.
  • Introduction
  • Rhetoric then and now
  • The first part of rhetoric : invention
  • The second part of rhetoric : arrangement
  • The third part of rhetoric : style
  • The fourth part of rhetoric : memory
  • The fifth part of rhetoric : delivery
  • Deliberative rhetoric
  • Judicial rhetoric
  • Epideitic rhetoric
  • Thus it can be shown--.
Green Library
ESF-15-04
Book
117 p. ; 23 cm.
Green Library
ESF-15-04