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Book
xxii, 746 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Scientific Writing and Communication: Papers, Proposals, and Presentations, Third Edition, covers all the areas of scientific communication that a scientist needs to know and master in order to successfully promote his or her research and career. This unique "all-in-one" handbook begins with a discussion of the basic principles of scientific writing style and composition and then applies these principles to writing research papers, review articles, grant proposals, research statements, and resumes, as well as to preparing academic presentations and posters. FEATURES A practical presentation carefully introduces basic writing mechanics before moving into manuscript planning and organizational strategies. Extensive hands-on guidance for composing scientific documents and presentations then follows. Relevant and multidisciplinary examples selected from real research papers and grant proposals by writers ranging from students to Nobel Laureates illustrate clear technical writing and common mistakes that one should avoid. Annotated text passages bring the writing principles and guidelines to life by applying them to real-world, relevant, and multidisciplinary examples. Extensive end-of-chapter exercise sets provide the opportunity to review style and composition principles and encourage readers to apply them to their own writing. Writing guidelines and revision checklists warn scientists against common pitfalls and equip them with the most successful techniques to revise a scientific paper, review article, or grant proposal. The book's clear, easy-to-follow writing style appeals to both native and non-native English speakers; special ESL features also point out difficulties experienced primarily by non-native speakers. Tables and lists of sample sentences and phrases aid in composing different sections of a scientific paper, review article, or grant proposal. Thorough attention to research articles advises readers on composing successful manuscripts for publication in peer-reviewed journals from initial drafting to the response to reviewers. Comprehensive coverage of grant writing guides scientists through the entire process of applying for a grant, from the initial letter of inquiry to proposal revision and submission.".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780190278540 20170227
Engineering Library (Terman)
ENGR-202W
Book
xviii, 445 pages ; 24 cm
  • Machine generated contents note: 1.Characteristics of Writing at Work
  • Writing at Work versus Writing at School
  • Requires acute awareness of security and legal liability
  • Requires awareness that documents may be read by unknown readers
  • Achieves job goals
  • Addresses a variety of readers who have different perspectives
  • Uses a variety of documents
  • The Foundations of Effective Writing at Work
  • The Qualities of Good Technical Writing
  • Cases 1-1
  • Exercises
  • 2.Writing for Your Readers
  • Understand Your Readers-The Heart of the Planning Process
  • Keep in mind that business readers want answers now
  • Determine your readers and their perspectives
  • Determine your purpose
  • Understand your role as a writer
  • Plan the content
  • Anticipate the context in which your writing will be received
  • The Basic Parts of the Composing Process
  • Analyzing the writing situation-purpose, readers, and context
  • Choosing/Discovering content
  • Cases 2-1
  • Cases 2-2
  • Arranging content
  • Drafting
  • Revising
  • Editing
  • Cases 2-3
  • Planning and Revision Checklist
  • Exercises
  • 3.Writing Ethically
  • Your Professional Obligations
  • Codes of Conduct and Standards of Practice
  • Recognizing Unethical Communication
  • Plagiarism and theft of intellectual property
  • Deliberately imprecise or ambiguous language
  • Manipulation of numerical information
  • Use of misleading illustrations
  • Promotion of prejudice
  • Uncritical use of information
  • Cases 3-1: Accuracy In Reporting
  • Cases 3-2: Teaching Ethics By Example
  • Managing Unethical Situations
  • Ethics Decision Checklist
  • Exercises
  • 4.Achieving a Readable Style
  • The Paragraph
  • Examples for study
  • Basic Principles of Effective Style
  • Determine your readers' knowledge of the subject
  • Determine whether a particular style will be expected
  • Adjust the style to the readers, the purpose, and the context
  • Keys to Building Effective Sentences
  • Watch sentence length
  • Keep subjects and verbs close together
  • Write squeaky-clean prose
  • Avoid pompous language; write to express, not to impress
  • Avoid excessive use of is/are verb forms
  • Use active voice for clarity
  • Word Choice
  • Style Checklist
  • Exercises
  • 5.Designing Documents
  • Understanding the Basics of Document Design
  • Know what decisions are yours to make
  • Choose a design that fits your situation
  • Plan your design from the beginning
  • Reveal your design to your readers
  • Keep your design consistent
  • Designing Effective Pages and Screens
  • Use blank space to frame and group information
  • Space the lines of text for easy reading
  • Adjust the line length to the size of the page or screen
  • Use a ragged right margin
  • Position words and illustrations in a complementary relationship
  • Helping Readers Locate Information
  • Use frequent headings
  • Write descriptive headings
  • Design distinctive headings
  • Use page numbers and headers or footers
  • Document Design Checklist
  • Exercises
  • 6.Designing Illustrations
  • Creating Illustrations
  • Tables
  • Bar and column graphs
  • Circle graphs
  • Line graphs
  • Organization charts
  • Flow charts
  • Project schedule charts
  • Diagrams
  • Photographs
  • Infographics
  • Video clips
  • Designing Illustrations Ethically
  • Illustration Checklist
  • Exercises
  • 7.E-mails, Texts, Memos, and Letters
  • E-mail and Text Messages
  • Memos and Letters
  • Guidelines for Ensuring Quality
  • Appropriate Tone in E-mails, Texts, Memos, and Letters
  • Guidelines for Dealing with Tone
  • Planning and Writing Correspondence
  • Case 7-1: Informational E-Mail Message
  • Case 7-2: Instructional Memo
  • Case 7-3: Letter Requesting Information
  • Case 7-4: Unfavorable News Letter
  • Case 7-5: Claim Letter
  • Case 7-6: Letter Of Reply
  • Correspondence Checklist
  • Exercises
  • 8.Technical Reports
  • Kinds of Reports
  • Report Categories-Informal and Formal
  • Informal Report Heading
  • Subject line
  • Reference
  • Action required
  • Distribution list
  • Parts of an Informal Technical Report
  • Introduction
  • Summary
  • Discussion
  • Conclusion
  • Recommendations
  • Attachments
  • Developing Reports
  • Cases 8-1
  • Cases 8-2
  • Elements of Formal Reports
  • Prefatory elements
  • Abstracts and summaries
  • Discussion, or body of the report
  • Collecting and grouping information
  • Cases 8-3
  • Conclusion(s)
  • Recommendations
  • Appendices
  • Letter Reports
  • Example Report for Study
  • Writing Collaboratively
  • The team leader
  • Requirements of team leaders
  • Requirements of team members
  • Report Checklist
  • Exercises
  • 9.Proposals and Progress Reports
  • Proposals
  • Example RFP
  • The context of proposal development
  • Effective argument in proposal development
  • Standard sections of proposals
  • Cases 9-1: Research Proposal
  • Case 9-2: Project Proposal
  • Progress Reports
  • Structure of progress reports
  • Cases 9-3
  • Cases 9-4
  • Style and Tone of Proposals and Progress Reports
  • Checklist for Developing Proposals and Progress Reports
  • Exercises
  • 10.Instructions, Procedures, and Policies
  • Instructions versus Procedures
  • Critical Role of Instructions and Procedures in the Workplace
  • Planning Instructions and Procedures
  • Structure and Organization
  • Introduction
  • Theory governing the procedure or instruction
  • Warnings, cautions, hazards, and notes regarding
  • safety or quality
  • Conditions under which the task should be performed
  • Name of each step
  • Cases 10-1: The Grignard Reaction
  • Case 10-2: Job Instructions
  • Case 10-3: Instructional Letter
  • Online Instructions
  • Cases 10-4
  • Checklist for Developing Instructions/Procedures
  • Exercises
  • 11.Oral Reports
  • Understanding the Speaking-Writing Relationship
  • Analyzing the Audience
  • Determining the Goal of Your Presentation
  • Choosing and Shaping Content
  • Analyzing the Context
  • Choosing the Organization
  • Choosing an Appropriate Speaking Style
  • Choosing Visuals to Enhance Your Purpose and Your Meaning
  • Planning Your Presentation-Questions You Need to Ask
  • Audience
  • Purpose
  • Context
  • Content
  • Graphics
  • Style
  • Speaking to Multicultural Audiences
  • Designing Each Segment
  • Choose an interesting title
  • Develop your presentation around three main divisions
  • Plan the introduction carefully
  • Design the body
  • Design the conclusion
  • Choosing an Effective Delivery Style
  • Techniques to Enhance Audience Comprehension
  • Designing and Presenting the Written Paper
  • Structuring the written speech
  • Writing the speech
  • Practicing the presentation
  • Checklist for Preparing Oral Reports
  • Exercises
  • 12.Résumés and Job Applications
  • The Correspondence of the Job Search
  • Letter of application
  • The resume
  • Follow-up letters
  • Interviewing
  • The interview
  • Negotiation
  • Before and after the interview
  • Job Search Checklist
  • Exercises.
Engineering Library (Terman)
ENGR-202W
Book
xxiv, 728 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • CHAPTER 1. PRELUDE -- 1.1 Importance of Writing in Science -- 1.2 About Readers -- 1.3 About Writers -- 1.4 About This Book -- 1.5 Design of This Book -- PART I. SCIENTIFIC WRITING PRINCIPLES: STYLE AND COMPOSITION -- CHAPTER 2. INDIVIDUAL WORDS -- 2.1 The Central Principle -- 2.2 Word Choice -- 2.3 Word Choice-Special Cases -- 2.4 Redundancies and Jargon -- 2.5 Abbreviations -- 2.6 Nomenclature and Terminology -- 2.7 Dictionaries -- CHAPTER 3. WORD LOCATION -- 3.1 Readers' Expectations -- 3.2 Competition for Emphasis -- 3.3 Placement of Words -- CHAPTER 4. TECHNICAL SENTENCES -- 4.1 Grammar and Technical Style -- 4.2 Person -- 4.3 Voice -- 4.4 Tense -- 4.5 Sentence Length -- 4.6 Verbs and Action -- 4.7 Noun Clusters -- 4.8 Pronouns -- 4.9 Lists and Comparisons -- 4.10 Faulty Comparisons -- 4.11 Common Errors -- CHAPTER 5. SPECIAL ESL GRAMMAR PROBLEMS -- 5.1 Prepositions -- 5.2 Articles -- 5.3 Verbs -- 5.4 Adjectives and Adverbs -- 5.5 Nouns and Pronouns -- 5.6 Grammar References -- CHAPTER 6. FROM SENTENCES TO PARAGRAPHS -- 6.1 Paragraph Structure -- 6.2 Paragraph Organization -- 6.3 Paragraph Coherence -- 6.4 Condensing -- PART II. PLANNING AND LAYING THE FOUNDATION -- CHAPTER 7. THE FIRST DRAFT -- 7.1 The Writing Process -- 7.2 Prewriting -- 7.3 Authorship -- 7.4 Drafting a Manuscript -- 7.5 Outlining and Composing a Manuscript -- 7.6 Writer's Block? -- 7.7 For ESL Authors -- 7.8 Outside Help -- CHAPTER 8. REFERENCES AND PLAGIARISM -- 8.1 About References -- 8.2 Selecting References -- 8.3 Managing References -- 8.4 Text Citations -- 8.5 Plagiarism -- 8.6 Paraphrasing -- 8.7 References Within a Scientific Paper -- 8.8 The Reference List -- 8.9 Common Reference Styles -- 8.10 Citing the Internet -- 8.11 Footnotes and Endnotes -- 8.12 Acknowledgments -- CHAPTER 9. FIGURES AND TABLES -- 9.1 General Guidelines -- 9.2 Importance of Formatting and Placement of Information -- 9.3 Figure or Table? -- 9.4 General Information on Figures -- 9.5 Types of Figures -- 9.6 Formatting Graphs -- 9.7 Examples of Graphs -- 9.8 Figure Legends -- 9.9 General Information on Tables -- 9.10 Formatting Tables -- * 9.11 Basics of Statistical Analysis -- * 9.12 Useful Resources for Statistical Analysis -- 9.13 Other Kinds of Supplementary Information: Formulas, Equations, Proofs, and Algorithms -- PART III. MANUSCRIPTS: RESEARCH PAPERS AND REVIEW ARTICLES -- A. RESEARCH PAPERS -- CHAPTER 10. THE INTRODUCTION -- 10.1 Overall -- 10.2 Content and Organization -- 10.3 Elements of the Introduction -- 10.4 Special Case: Introductions for Descriptive Papers -- 10.5 Important Writing Principles for the Introduction -- 10.6 Signals for the Reader -- 10.7 Common Problems of Introductions -- 10.8 Sample Introductions -- 10.9 Revising the Introduction -- CHAPTER 11. MATERIALS AND METHODS SECTION -- 11.1 Overall -- 11.2 Content -- 11.3 Organization -- 11.4 Important Writing Principles for Materials and Methods -- 11.5 Ethical Conduct -- 11.6 Common Problems of Materials and Methods Section -- 11.7 Sample Materials and Methods Sections -- 11.8 Revising the Materials and Methods Section -- CHAPTER 12. RESULTS -- 12.1 Overall -- 12.2 Content -- 12.3 Organization -- 12.4 Important Writing Principles for the Results -- 12.5 Signals for the Reader -- 12.6 Common Problems of the Results Section -- 12.7 Sample Results Sections -- 12.8 Revising the Results Section -- CHAPTER 13. DISCUSSION -- 13.1 Overall -- 13.2 Content -- 13.3 Organization -- 13.4 First Paragraph -- 13.5 Middle Paragraphs -- 13.6 Last Paragraph -- 13.7 Important Writing Principles for the Discussion -- 13.8 Signals for the Reader -- 13.9 An Alternative: Results and Discussion -- 13.10 Common Problems of the Discussion -- 13.11 Sample Discussions -- 13.12 Revising the Discussion -- CHAPTER 14. ABSTRACT -- 14.1 Overall -- 14.2 Content -- 14.3 Organization -- 14.4 Applying Basic Writing Principles -- 14.5 Signals for the Reader -- 14.6 Common Problems of the Abstract -- 14.7 Reasons for Rejection -- 14.8 Revising the Abstract -- CHAPTER 15. TITLES, TITLE PAGES, AND KEY WORDS -- 15.1 Overall -- 15.2 Strong Titles -- 15.3 The Title Page -- 15.4 Running Title -- 15.5 Key Words -- 15.6 Revising the Title -- CHAPTER 16. REVISING AND REVIEWING A MANUSCRIPT -- 16.1 Revising the First Draft -- 16.2 Subsequent Drafts -- 16.3 Reviewing a Manuscript -- CHAPTER 17. FINAL VERSION, SUBMISSION, AND PEER REVIEW -- 17.1 General Advice on the Final Version -- 17.2 Submitting the Manuscript -- 17.3 Writing a Cover Letter -- 17.4 The Review Process -- 17.5 Letter from the Editor -- 17.6 Resubmission -- 17.7 Paper Accepted -- B. REVIEW ARTICLES -- CHAPTER 18. REVIEW ARTICLES -- 18.1 Overall -- 18.2 Content -- 18.3 Organization -- 18.4 Abstract of a Review Article -- 18.5 Introduction of a Review Article -- 18.6 Main Analysis Section of a Review Article -- 18.7 Conclusion of a Review Article -- 18.8 References -- 18.9 Signals for the Reader -- 18.10 Coherence -- 18.11 Common Problems of Review Articles -- 18.12 Revising the Review Article -- PART IV. GRANT PROPOSALS -- CHAPTER 19. PROPOSAL WRITING -- 19.1 General -- 19.2 Types of Proposals -- 19.3 Choosing a Sponsoring Agency -- 19.4 Federal Agencies -- 19.5 Private Foundations -- 19.6 Corporations and Other Funders -- 19.7 Preliminary Steps to Writing a Proposal -- 19.8 Online Resources -- 19.9 Starting to Write a Grant -- 19.10 Interacting With the Funder -- CHAPTER 20. LETTERS OF INQUIRY AND PREPROPOSALS -- 20.1 General -- 20.2 Content and Organization -- 20.3 Abstract/Overview -- 20.4 Introduction/Background -- 20.5 Statement of Need -- 20.6 Objective and Specific Aims -- 20.7 Strategy and Goals -- 20.8 Leadership and Organization -- 20.9 Budget -- 20.10 Impact and Significance -- 20.11 Cover Letter -- 20.12 Verbal Proposals -- 20.13 LOI Outlines -- 20.14 Revising an LOI/Preproposal -- CHAPTER 21. ABSTRACT AND SPECIFIC AIMS -- 21.1 Overall -- 21.2 Abstract -- 21.3 Specific Aims -- 21.4 Significance and Impact -- 21.5 Applying Basic Writing Principles -- 21.6 Signals for the Reader -- 21.7 Common Problems -- 21.8 Reasons for Rejection -- 21.9 Revising the Abstract and Specific Aims -- CHAPTER 22. BACKGROUND AND SIGNIFICANCE -- 22.1 Overall -- 22.2 Emphasis, Organization, and Length -- 22.3 References -- 22.4 Elements of the Section -- * 22.5 Sample Significance Section for Federal Grants -- 22.6 Signals for the Reader -- 22.7 Coherence -- 22.8 Common Problems -- 22.9 Revising the Background and Significance Section -- * CHAPTER 23. INNOVATION -- 23.1 Content -- 23.2 Organization -- 23.3 Signals for the Reader -- 23.4 Common Problems -- 23.5 Revising the Innovation Section -- CHAPTER 24. PRELIMINARY RESULTS -- 24.1 General Content -- 24.2 Organization -- 24.3 Important Writing Principles -- 24.4 Signals for Preliminary Results -- 24.5 Common Problems of Preliminary Results -- 24.6 Revising the Preliminary Results -- CHAPTER 25. APPROACH/RESEARCH DESIGN -- 25.1 Overall -- 25.2 Content -- 25.3 Organization -- 25.4 Closing Paragraph -- 25.5 Signals for the Reader -- 25.6 Common Problems -- 25.7 Revising the Research Design and Methods Section -- CHAPTER 26. BUDGET AND OTHER SPECIAL PROPOSAL SECTIONS -- 26.1 Budget -- 26.2 Other Special Proposal Sections -- CHAPTER 27. REVISING AND SUBMITTING A PROPOSAL -- 27.1 General -- 27.2 Before Sending Out the Proposal -- 27.3 Revising the Proposal -- 27.4 Submitting the Proposal -- 27.5 Being Reviewed -- 27.6 Site Visits -- *27.7 Reasons for Rejection -- 27.8 If Your Proposal Is Rejected -- 27.9 Resubmission of a Proposal -- 27.10 If Your Proposal Is Funded -- PART V. POSTERS AND PRESENTATIONS -- CHAPTER 28. POSTERS AND CONFERENCE ABSTRACTS -- 28.1 Function and General Overview -- 28.2 Content -- 28.3 Organization -- 28.4 Sections of a Poster -- 28.5 Photos, Figures, and Tables -- 28.6 Resources for Preparing and Presenting a Poster -- *28.7 Revising a Poster -- 28.8 Presenting the Poster -- 28.9 Sample Posters -- 28.10 Checklist for a Poster -- 28.11 Conference Abstracts -- CHAPTER 29. ORAL PRESENTATIONS -- 29.1 Before the Talk -- 29.2 Content and Organization of a Scientific Talk -- 29.3 Visual Aids -- 29.4 Preparing for a Talk -- 29.5 Giving the Talk -- 29.6 Voice and Delivery -- 29.7 Vocabulary and Style -- 29.8 Body Actions and Motions -- 29.9 At the End of the Presentation -- 29.10 Questions and Answers -- 29.11 Other Speech Forms -- *29.12 Resources -- 29.13 Checklist for an Oral Presentation -- PART VI. JOB APPLICATIONS -- CHAPTER 30. WRITING FOR JOB APPLICATIONS -- 30.1 Overall -- 30.2 Curricula Vitae (CVs) and Resumes -- 30.3 Cover Letters -- 30.4 Accompanying Documents -- 30.5 Research Statements -- 30.6 Teaching Statements -- 30.7 Resources -- 30.8 Letters of Recommendation -- 30.9 Checklist for the Job Application -- APPENDIX A: COMMONLY CONFUSED AND MISUSED WORDS -- * APPENDIX B: TIPS ON MS WORD -- * APPENDIX C: TIPS ON MS EXCEL -- * APPENDIX D: TIPS ON MS POWERPOINT -- * APPENDIX E: MS OFFICE CHEAT SHEET.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199947560 20160616
Scientific Writing and Communication: Papers, Proposals, and Presentations, Second Edition, serves as a comprehensive <"one-stop>" reference guide to scientific writing and communication. The second edition of Angelika Hofmann's successful text covers all the areas of scientific communication that a scientist needs to know and master in order to successfully promote his or her research and career. This unique "all-in-one" handbook begins with a discussion of the basic principles of scientific writing style and composition and then applies these principles to writing research papers, review articles, grant proposals, research statements, and resumes, as well as to preparing academic presentations and posters. Scientific Writing and Communication: Papers, Proposals, and Presentations has been used successfully for a number of years in courses on scientific writing at various universities and institutes worldwide. Readers of the second edition will find numerous new examples and exercises, many with an expanded interdisciplinary focus. Every major section of the text has been updated, with new sections on writing mechanics, expanded coverage of grant writing (including the latest need-to-know information on writing successful federal grants), more advice on preparing posters, conference presentations, and job resumes, and a new set of <"Top 20 Tips>" quick-reference appendices for using Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. The new second edition of this handbook shows readers how to write clearly and how to recognize shortcomings in their own writing. The book targets a broad audience ranging from upper-level undergraduate students to graduate students, from postdoctoral fellows and faculty to fully fledged researchers. It does so not only by providing crucial knowledge about the structure and delivery of written material but also by explaining how readers go about reading. The level of presentation is geared for those looking to improve their writing without having to read many different books on the subject. Although the second edition of Papers, Proposals, and Presentations can be used as a textbook, it is structured such that it is equally self-explanatory, allowing readers to understand how to write publications or proposals and to present scientific talks without having to take a class.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199947560 20160616
Engineering Library (Terman), Marine Biology Library (Miller)
ENGR-202W
Book
xix, 379 p. : col. ill., col. maps ; 24 cm.
Engineering Library (Terman)
ENGR-202W
Book
xxi, 682 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Engineering Library (Terman), Science Library (Li and Ma)
ENGR-202W
Engineering Library (Terman)
ENGR-202W