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Book
xx, 375 pages ; 24 cm
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"Baraka, Al, Teddy, and Sayyid--four black men from South Philadelphia, two Christian and two Muslim--are serving life at Pennsylvania's maximum-security Graterford Prison. All of them work in Graterford's chapel, a place that is at once a sanctuary for religious contemplation and an arena for disputing the works of God and man. Day in, day out, everything is, in its twisted way, rather ordinary. And then one of them disappears. Down in the Chapel tells the story of one week at Graterford Prison. We learn how the men at Graterford pass their time, care for themselves, and commune with their makers. We observe a variety of Muslims, Protestants, Catholics, and others at prayer and study and song. And we listen in as an interloping scholar of religion tries to make sense of it all. When prisoners turn to God, they are often scorned as con artists who fake their piety, or pitied as wretches who cling to faith because faith is all they have left. Joshua Dubler goes beyond these stereotypes to show the religious life of a prison in all its complexity. One part prison procedural, one part philosophical investigation, Down in the Chapel explores the many uses prisoners make of their religions and weighs the circumstances that make these uses possible. Gritty and visceral, meditative and searching, it is an essential study of American religion in the age of mass incarceration."--Jacket.
Education Library (Cubberley)
EDUC-413-01
Book
viii, 281 p. : ill ; 25 cm.
  • Introduction: encounters at a multidenominational temple in the South
  • Bringing a regional perspective to American Buddhism
  • The gift of light: Buddhist circuit riders and new religious developments in Richmond, Virginia
  • The Buddhist confederacy: differentiation and identity in Buddhist spaces
  • There's no such thing as "not my Buddhism": hybridity, boundary-crossing, and the practice of pluralistic Buddhism
  • Buddhism with a Southern accent: American Buddhists in a Southern culture
  • The reality of our collective karma: slave trade meditation vigil as Southern Buddhist ritual
  • Conclusion: Buddhas on the backstretch.
Buddhism in the United States is often viewed in connection with practitioners in the Northeast and on the West Coast, but in fact, it has been spreading and evolving throughout the United States since the mid-nineteenth century. In "Dixie Dharma, " Jeff Wilson argues that region is crucial to understanding American Buddhism. Through the lens of a multidenominational Buddhist temple in Richmond, Virginia, Wilson explores how Buddhists are adapting to life in the conservative evangelical Christian culture of the South, and how traditional Southerners are adjusting to these newer members on the religious landscape. Introducing a host of overlooked characters, including Buddhist circuit riders, modernist Pure Land priests, and pluralistic Buddhists, Wilson shows how regional specificity manifests itself through such practices as meditation vigils to heal the wounds of the slave trade. He argues that southern Buddhists at once use bodily practices, iconography, and meditation tools to enact distinct sectarian identities even as they enjoy a creative hybridity.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780807835456 20160608
Education Library (Cubberley)
EDUC-413-01
Book
ix, 228 pages ; 24 cm.
  • A day in the life of Nada
  • Ambiguous times and spaces
  • Jordan and the al-Khatwa Secondary School for Girls : people, place, and time
  • Performing patriotism : rituals and moral authority in a Jordanian high school
  • Who is a good Muslim? : making proper faith in a girls' high school
  • Making girls into respectable women
  • Education for what? : women, work, and development in Jordan.
In 2005 the World Bank released a gender assessment of the nation of Jordan, a country that, like many in the Middle East, has undergone dramatic social and gender transformations, in part by encouraging equal access to education for men and women. The resulting demographic picture there - highly educated women who still largely stay at home as mothers and caregivers - prompted the World Bank to label Jordan a "gender paradox." In "Gendered Paradoxes", Fida J. Adely shows that assessment to be a fallacy, taking readers into the rarely seen halls of a Jordanian public school - the al-Khatwa High School for Girls - and revealing the dynamic lives of its students, for whom such trends are far from paradoxical. Through the lives of these students, Adely explores the critical issues young people in Jordan grapple with today: nationalism and national identity, faith and the requisites of pious living, appropriate and respectable gender roles, and progress. In the process she shows the important place of education in Jordan, one less tied to the economic ends of labor and employment that are so emphasized by the rest of the developed world. In showcasing alternative values and the highly capable young women who hold them, Adely raises fundamental questions about what constitutes development, progress, and empowerment - not just for Jordanians, but for the whole world.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226006918 20160610
Education Library (Cubberley)
EDUC-413-01
Book
xxviii, 233 p. ; 25 cm.
  • Preface to the 2012 Edition ix Preface xxi Acknowledgments xxv Note on Transcription xxix CHAPTER 1: The Subject of Freedom 1 CHAPTER 2: Topography of the Piety Movement 40 CHAPTER 3: Pedagogies of Persuasion 79 CHAPTER 4: Positive Ethics and Ritual Conventions 118 CHAPTER 5: Agency, Gender, and Embodiment 153 Epilogue 189 Glossary of Commonly Used Arabic Terms 201 References 205 Index 225.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691149806 20160607
"Politics of Piety" is a groundbreaking analysis of Islamist cultural politics through the ethnography of a thriving, grassroots women's piety movement in the mosques of Cairo, Egypt. Unlike those organized Islamist activities that seek to seize or transform the state, this is a moral reform movement whose orthodox practices are commonly viewed as inconsequential to Egypt's political landscape. Saba Mahmood's compelling exposition of these practices challenges this assumption by showing how the ethical and the political are indelibly linked within the context of such movements. Not only is this book a sensitive ethnography of a critical but largely ignored dimension of the Islamic revival, it is also an unflinching critique of the secular-liberal assumptions by which some people hold such movements to account. The book addresses three central questions: How do movements of moral reform help us rethink the normative liberal account of politics? How does the adherence of women to the patriarchal norms at the core of such movements parochialize key assumptions within feminist theory about freedom, agency, authority, and the human subject? How does a consideration of debates about embodied religious rituals among Islamists and their secular critics help us understand the conceptual relationship between bodily form and political imaginaries? "Politics of Piety" is an essential reading for anyone interested in issues at the nexus of ethics and politics, embodiment and gender, and liberalism and postcolonialism. In a substantial new preface, Mahmood addresses the controversy sparked by the original publication of her book and the scholarly discussions that have ensued.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691149806 20160607
Education Library (Cubberley)
EDUC-413-01
Book
xvii, 260 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Acknowledgments ix Notes on Yiddish and Transcription Conventions xiii CHAPTER ONE: Introduction 1 CHAPTER TWO: Fitting In 34 CHAPTER THREE: Defiance 62 CHAPTER FOUR: Making English Jewish 87 CHAPTER FIVE: With It, Not Modern 118 CHAPTER SIX: Ticket to Eden 145 CHAPTER SEVEN: Becoming Hasidic Wives 179 Coda 211 Notes 221 Glossary 235 References 237 Index 251.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691139173 20160528
"Mitzvah Girls" is the first book about bringing up Hasidic Jewish girls in North America, providing an in-depth look into a closed community. Ayala Fader examines language, gender, and the body from infancy to adulthood, showing how Hasidic girls in Brooklyn become women responsible for rearing the next generation of nonliberal Jewish believers. To uncover how girls learn the practices of Hasidic Judaism, Fader looks beyond the synagogue to everyday talk in the context of homes, classrooms, and city streets. Hasidic women complicate stereotypes of nonliberal religious women by collapsing distinctions between the religious and the secular. In this innovative book, Fader demonstrates that contemporary Hasidic femininity requires women and girls to engage with the secular world around them, protecting Hasidic men and boys who study the Torah. Even as Hasidic religious observance has become more stringent, Hasidic girls have unexpectedly become more fluent in secular modernity. They are fluent Yiddish speakers but switch to English as they grow older; they are increasingly modest but also fashionable; they read fiction and play games like those of mainstream American children but theirs have Orthodox Jewish messages; and they attend private Hasidic schools that freely adapt from North American public and parochial models. Investigating how Hasidic women and girls conceptualize the religious, the secular, and the modern, "Mitzvah Girls" offers exciting new insights into cultural production and change in nonliberal religious communities.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691139173 20160528
Education Library (Cubberley)
EDUC-413-01
Book
1 vol. (292 p.) : ill., couv. ill. en coul. ; 23 cm
Over the past thirty years, visionary anthropologist Michael Taussig has crafted a highly distinctive body of work. Playful, enthralling, and whip-smart, his writing makes ingenious connections between ideas, thinkers, and things. An extended meditation on the mysteries of color and the fascination they provoke, "What Color Is the Sacred?" is the next step on Taussig's remarkable intellectual path. Following his interest in magic and surrealism, his earlier work on mimesis, and his recent discussion of heat, gold, and cocaine in "My Cocaine Museum", this book uses color to explore further dimensions of what Taussig calls 'the bodily unconscious' in an age of global warming. Drawing on classic ethnography as well as the work of Benjamin, Burroughs, and Proust, he takes up the notion that color invites the viewer into images and into the world. Yet, as Taussig makes clear, color has a history - a manifestly colonial history rooted in the West's discomfort with color, especially bright color, and its associations with the so-called primitive. He begins by noting Goethe's belief that Europeans are physically averse to vivid color while the uncivilized revel in it, which prompts Taussig to reconsider colonialism as a tension between chromophobes and chromophiliacs. And he ends with the strange story of coal, which, he argues, displaced colonial color by giving birth to synthetic colors, organic chemistry, and IG Farben, the giant chemical corporation behind the Third Reich. Nietzsche once wrote, 'So far, all that has given colour to existence still lacks a history'. With "What Color Is the Sacred?", Taussig has taken up that challenge with all the radiant intelligence and inspiration we've come to expect from him.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226790060 20171227
Education Library (Cubberley)
EDUC-413-01
Book
xiii, 192 p. ; 24 cm.
How do people practice religion in their everyday lives? Courtney Bender spent more than a year working as a volunteer for a non-profit organisation called God's Love We Deliver, helping to prepare food for people with AIDs, this volume tells the story of that time.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226042824 20160528
Filled with vivid storytelling and rich theoretical insights, "Heaven's Kitchen" shows faith as a living practice, reshaping our understanding of the role of religion in contemporary American life.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226042817 20160528
Education Library (Cubberley)
EDUC-413-01
Book
x, 620 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
  • Acknowledgments.General Introduction.Part I: The Context of Understanding and Debate:Opening Frameworks:Introduction.1. Religion in Primitive Culture: Edward Burnett Tylor.2. The Elementary Forms of Religious Life: Emile Durkheim.3. The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism: Max Weber.4. Religion as a Cultural System: Clifford Geertz.Skeptical Rejoinders:Introduction.5. Remarks on Frazer's Golden Bough: Ludwig Wittgenstein.6. Religion, Totemism and Symbolism: W. E. H. Stanner.7. Christians as Believers: Malcolm Ruel.8. The Construction of Religion as an Anthropological Category: Talal Asad.Part II: Poiesis: The Composition of Religious Worlds:Signs and Symbols:Introduction.9. The Logic of Signs and Symbols: Susanne K. Langer.10. The Problem of Symbols: E. E. Evans-Pritchard.11. On Key Symbols: Sherry B. Ortner.12. The Virgin of Guadalupe: A Mexican National Symbol: Eric Wolf.Structure, Function, and Interpretation:Introduction.13. Myth in Primitive Psychology: Bronislaw Malinowski.14. Folk Dialectics of Nature and Culture: Marshall Sahlins.15. Land Animals, Pure and Impure: Mary Douglas.16. A Jivaro Version of Totem and Taboo: Claude Levi-Strauss.17. Text-Building, Epistemology, and Aesthetics in Javanese Shadow Theatre: Alton Becker.Moral Inversions and Spaces of Disorder:Introduction.18. The Winnebago Trickster Figure: Paul Radin.19. Witchcraft and Sexual Relations: An Exploration in the Social and Semantic Implications of the Structure of Belief: Raymond C. Kelly.20. The Politics and Poetics of Transgression: Peter Stallybrass and Allon White.Conceptualizing the Cosmos.Introduction.21. Closure and Multiplication: An Essay on Polynesian Cosmology and Ritual Alfred Gell.22. Cosmological Deixis and Amerindian Perspectivism: Eduardo Viveiros de Castro.Part III: Praxis: Religious Action:The Movement in Ritual: Emergence:Introduction.23. The Control of Experience: Symbolic Action: Godfrey Lienhardt.24. Form and Meaning of Magical Acts: Stanley Jeyaraja Tambiah.25. Liminality and Communitas: Victor Turner.Religion and Personal Experience:Introduction.26. Fate in Relation to the Social Structure: Meyer Fortes.27. Medusa's Hair: An Essay on Personal Symbols and Religious Experience: Gananath Obeyesekere.28. Spirits and Selves in Northern Sudan: The Cultural Therapeutics of Possession and Trance: Janice Boddy.29. The Poetics of Time in Mayan Divination: Dennis Tedlock.What Ritual Does: The Foundations of Order:Introduction.30. The Disconnection between Power and Rank as a Process: Maurice Bloch.31. Enactments of Meaning: Roy A. Rappaport.Part IV: Historical Dynamics: Power, Modernity, and Change:Capitalism, Colonialism, Christianity, and Conflict:Introduction.32. The Genesis of Capitalism amongst a South American Peasantry: Devil's Labor and the Baptism of Money: Michael Taussig.33. The Colonization of Consciousness: John and Jean Comaroff.Religious Ethics and Politics in the State and the Transnational Scene:Introduction.34. Civil Religion in America: Robert N. Bellah.35. "Using the Past to Negate the Present": Ritual Ethics and State Rationality in Ancient China: Mayfair Mei-Hui Yang.36. Passional Preaching, Aural Sensibility, and the Islamic Revival in Cairo: Charles Hirschkind.37. Moral Landscapes: Ethical Discourses among Orthodox and Diaspora Jains: Anne Vallely.Part V: Research Tools:A Guide to the Literature. Bibliography. Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780631221135 20160527
"A Reader in the Anthropology of Religion" is a collection of some of the most significant classic and contemporary writings within the anthropology of religion. Editor Michael Lambek has taken care to avoid deifying the category of religion and the various topics often subsumed within it. Indeed, a major contribution by anthropologists has been to challenge these kinds of categories, which stem from Western thought and language, Christianity, and ethnocentric views of non-Western people. This reader includes material whose theme is 'religion' in a straightforward and obvious sense, as well as contributions that expand how we might look at religion - and the horizons of what we mean by 'religion' - linking it to broader questions of culture and politics. Designed for maximum utility, this volume includes a general introduction as well as an extensive bibliography indexed according to both ethnographic region and religious topics and practices, in order to enhance its accessibility. Each section and individual entry in the volume includes brief prefatory remarks by the editor and suggestions for further reading.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780631221135 20160527
Education Library (Cubberley)
EDUC-413-01
Book
x, 408 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Glenn Hinson focuses on a single gospel program and offers a major contribution to our understanding not just of gospel but of the nature of religious experience. A key feature of African American performance is the layering of performative voices and the constant shifting of performative focus. To capture this layering, Hinson demonstrates how all the parts of the gospel program work together to shape a single whole, joining speech and song, performer and audience, testimony, prayer, preaching, and singing into a seamless and multifaceted service of worship. Personal stories ground the discussion at every turn, while experiential testimony fuels the unfolding arguments. Fire in My Bones is an original exploration of experience and belief in a community of African American Christians, but it is also an exploration of African American aesthetics, the study of belief, and the ethnographic enterprise.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812235289 20160527
The saints of the African American sanctified community say that the soul is the domain not of body or mind, but of spirit. And when the Spirit touches spirit, the soul rejoices in an epiphany of truth and knowledge. Speaking of soul, Spirit, and experience draws discourse into a realm rarely explored by ethnographic inquiry. Ethnography has traditionally avoided encounter with the subjective realm of experience -- not just supernatural experience, but experience in general. In Fire in My Bones, Glenn Hinson focuses on a single gospel program and offers a major contribution to our understanding not just of gospel, but of the nature of religious experience. A key feature of African American performance is the layering of performative voices and the constant shifting of performative focus. To capture this layering, Hinson demonstrates how all the parts of the gospel program work together to shape a single whole, joining speech and song; performer and audience; testimony, prayer, preaching, and singing into a seamless and multifaceted service of worship: the service becomes his model, from the opening song to the final benediction. Personal stories ground the discussion at every turn, while experiential testimony fuels the unfolding arguments. Fire in My Bones is an extraordinary and original exploration of experience and belief in a community of African American Christians, but it is also an exploration of African American aesthetics, the study of belief, and the ethnographic enterprise.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812217179 20160528
Education Library (Cubberley)
EDUC-413-01
Book
306 p.
Anthropologist Myerhoff's penetrating exploration of the aging process is brilliant sociology--as well as living history--that tells readers about the importance of ritual, the agonies of aging, and the indomitable human spirit. "(The book) shines with the luminous wit of old age".--Robert Bly.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780452011229 20160527
Education Library (Cubberley)
EDUC-413-01
Book
xii, 219 p. ; 23 cm.
  • Exu: The Lips of Pomba-Gira, Padilha's Vow, Corquisa ... Caboclo: Order and Progress, Of Keys, Villages ...Orix.: Child Spirits, The Throne, Tempo ... Egum.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812213416 20160528
Candomble, a religion that traces its origins to West Africa, has become a major cultural force by adapting itself to the realities of contemporary Brazil. Spirit possession is an important feature of the rituals of this religion, and it also plays a significant part in the everyday lives of its adherents. The fact that Candomble is an essentially oral tradition means that it is difficult to understand if one attempts to separate it from the particular individuals who embody it. Accordingly, this study takes the form of a series of interlinked narratives that present the religion through the words, passions, actions and interactions of members, both spirit and human, of a small Candomble community on the outskirts of the city of Salvador da Bahia. The analytical commentary that is woven into these narratives focuses on the negotiation of boundaries within Candomble. The boundary between human and spirit realms has analogies with other boundaries - between individuals, between the sexes, between humans and animals, and between classes. These considerations provide the opportunity for reflection on anthropology's negotiation of the boundaries between cultures.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812230611 20160527
Enter the fascinating world of the Condomble regions of Brazil, where interaction between spirits and human is considered an everyday occurrence. Jim Wafer uncovers the social life, rituals, folklore, and engaging personalities of the villagers of Jacari, among whom trances, sorcery, and spirit possession demonstrate the coexistence of different kinds of reality. This ethnography is intriguing not only because of the originality of its approach to the more enigmatic aspects of another culture but also because it uses insights gained from participation in that culture to reflect on the paradoxes inherent in the writer's own culture, and in the human condition in general.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812213416 20160528
Education Library (Cubberley)
EDUC-413-01
Book
ix, 247 p. ; 22 cm.
Education Library (Cubberley)
EDUC-413-01
Book
vi, 231 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Education Library (Cubberley)
EDUC-413-01
Book
xvi, 331 p. ; 25 cm.
Education Library (Cubberley), SAL3 (off-campus storage)
EDUC-413-01