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Book
x, 246 pages ; 22 cm
  • Style as choice
  • Understanding style
  • Correctness
  • Clarity
  • Actions
  • Characters
  • Cohesion and coherence
  • Emphasis
  • Clarity of form
  • Motivation
  • Global coherence
  • Grace
  • Concision
  • Shape --Elegance
  • Ethics
  • The ethics of style.
Education Library (Cubberley), Science Library (Li and Ma)
EDUC-292-01
Book
xxvi, 323 pages ; 19 cm
"They Say / I Say" identifies the key rhetorical moves in academic writing, showing students how to frame their arguments in the larger context of what others have said and providing templates to help them make those moves. And, because these moves are central across all disciplines, the book includes chapters on writing in the sciences, writing in the social sciences, and-new to this edition-writing about literature.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780393935844 20160612
Education Library (Cubberley)
EDUC-292-01
Book
viii, 220 p. : ill ; 22 cm.
  • Machine generated contents note: pt. I Style and Substance
  • 1.Rules of Engagement
  • 2.On Being Disciplined
  • 3.A Guide to the Style Guides
  • pt. II The Elements of Stylishness
  • 4.Voice and Echo
  • 5.Smart Sentencing
  • 6.Tempting Titles
  • 7.Hooks and Sinkers
  • 8.The Story Net
  • 9.Show and Tell
  • 10.Jargonitis
  • 11.Structural Designs
  • 12.Points of Reference
  • 13.The Big Picture
  • 14.The Creative Touch.
Elegant data and ideas deserve elegant expression, argues Helen Sword in this lively guide to academic writing. For scholars frustrated with disciplinary conventions, and for specialists who want to write for a larger audience but are unsure where to begin, here are imaginative, practical, witty pointers that show how to make articles and books a pleasure to read - and to write. Dispelling the myth that you cannot get published without writing wordy, impersonal prose, Sword shows how much journal editors and readers welcome work that avoids excessive jargon and abstraction. Sword's analysis of more than a thousand peer-reviewed articles across a wide range of fields documents a startling gap between how academics typically describe good writing and the turgid prose they regularly produce. "Stylish Academic Writing" showcases a range of scholars from the sciences, humanities, and social sciences who write with vividness and panache. Individual chapters take up specific elements of style, such as titles and headings, chapter openings, and structure, and close with examples of transferable techniques that any writer can master.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674064485 20160608
Elegant ideas deserve elegant expression. Sword dispels the myth that you can't get published without writing wordy, impersonal prose. For scholars frustrated with disciplinary conventions or eager to write for a larger audience, here are imaginative, practical, witty pointers that show how to make articles and books enjoyable to read-and to write.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674065093 20160608
Education Library (Cubberley), Marine Biology Library (Miller), Science Library (Li and Ma)
EDUC-292-01
Book
lx, 942 p. ; 26 cm.
Since first appearing in 1998, Garners Modern American Usage has established itself as the preeminent guide to the effective use of the English language. Brimming with witty, erudite essays on troublesome words and phrases, GMAU authoritatively shows how to avoid the countless pitfalls that await unwary writers and speakers whether the issues relate to grammar, punctuation, word choice, or pronunciation. An exciting new feature of this third edition is Garners Language-Change Index, which registers where each disputed usage in modern English falls on a five-stage continuum from nonacceptability (to the language community as a whole) to acceptability, giving the book a consistent standard throughout. GMAU is the first usage guide ever to incorporate such a language-change index. The judgments are based both on Garners own original research in linguistic corpora and on his analysis of hundreds of earlier studies. Another first in this edition is the panel of critical readers: 120-plus commentators who have helped Garner reassess and update the text, so that every page has been improved. Bryan A. Garner is a writer, grammarian, lexicographer, teacher, and lawyer. He has written professionally about English usage for more than 28 years, and his work has achieved widespread renown. David Foster Wallace proclaimed that Bryan Garner is a genius and William Safire called the book excellent. In fact, due to the strength of his work on GMAU, Garner was the grammarian asked to write the grammar-and-usage chapter for the venerable Chicago Manual of Style. His advice on language matters is second to none.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195382754 20160528
Education Library (Cubberley)
EDUC-292-01
Book
xiv, 197 p. ; 22 cm.
  • Freshman English for graduate students
  • Persona and authority
  • One right way
  • Editing by ear
  • Learning to write as a professional
  • Risk / by Pamela Richards
  • Getting it out the door
  • Terrorized by the literature
  • Writing with computers
  • A final word.
Social scientists, whether earnest graduate students or tenured faculty members, clearly know the rules that govern good writing. But for some reason they choose to ignore those guidelines and churn out turgid, pompous, and obscure prose. Distinguished sociologist Howard S. Becker, true to his calling, looks for an explanation for this bizarre behavior not in the psyches of his colleagues but in the structure of his profession. In this highly personal and inspirational volume he considers academic writing as a social activity.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226041308 20160527
Students and researchers all write under pressure, and those pressures - most lamentably, the desire to impress your audience rather than to communicate with them - often lead to pretentious prose, academic posturing, and, not infrequently, writer's block. Sociologist Howard S. Becker has written the classic book on how to conquer these pressures and simply write. First published nearly twenty years ago, "Writing for Social Scientists" has become a lifesaver for writers in all fields, from beginning students to published authors. Becker's message is clear: in order to learn how to write, take a deep breath and then begin writing. Revise. Repeat. It is not always an easy process, as Becker wryly relates. Decades of teaching, researching, and writing have given him plenty of material, and Becker neatly exposes the foibles of academia and its "publish or perish" atmosphere. Wordiness, the passive voice, inserting a "the way in which" when a simple "how" will do - all these mechanisms are a part of the social structure of academic writing. By shrugging off such impediments - or at the very least, putting them aside for a few hours - we can reform our work habits and start writing lucidly without worrying about grades, peer approval, or "the literature." In this new edition, Becker takes account of major changes in the computer tools available today and also substantially expands his analysis of how academic institutions create problems for writers. As competition in higher education grows increasingly heated, "Writing for Social Scientists" will provide solace to a new generation of frazzled, would-be writers.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226041322 20160528
Education Library (Cubberley)
EDUC-292-01