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Book
viii, 177 pages ; 24 cm
  • Introduction
  • Research and politics : the culture of poverty knowledge
  • Kinship and family structure : ethnocentric myopia
  • There goes the neighborhood : deconcentration and destruction of public housing
  • Crime, criminals, and tangles of pathology
  • Commercializing the culture of poverty
  • Ending poverty as we know it : and other apparently unreachable goals.
In 1965, the late Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan - then a high-ranking official in the Department of Labor - sparked a firestorm when he released his report "The Negro Family", which came to be regarded by both supporters and detractors as an indictment of African American culture. Blaming the Poor examines the regrettably durable impact of the Moynihan Report for race relations and social policy in America, challenging the humiliating image the report cast on poor black families and its misleading explanation of the causes of poverty. A leading authority on poverty and racism in the United States, Susan D. Greenbaum dismantles Moynihan's main thesis - that the so called matriarchal structure of the African American family "feminized" black men, making them inadequate workers and absent fathers, and resulting in what he called a tangle of pathology that led to a host of ills, from teen pregnancy to adult crime. Drawing on extensive scholarship, Greenbaum highlights the flaws in Moynihan's analysis. She reveals how his questionable ideas have been used to redirect blame for substandard schools, low wages, and the scarcity of jobs away from the societal forces that cause these problems, while simultaneously reinforcing stereotypes about African Americans. Greenbaum also critiques current policy issues that are directly affected by the tangle of pathology mindset -the demonization and destruction of public housing; the criminalization of black youth; and the continued humiliation of the poor by entrepreneurs who become rich consulting to teachers, non-profits, and social service personnel. A half century later, Moynihan's thesis remains for many a convenient justification for punitive measures and stingy indifference to the poor. Blaming the Poor debunks this infamous thesis, proposing instead more productive and humane policies to address the enormous problems facing us today.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813574141 20160619
Education Library (Cubberley)
EDUC-232-01
Book
xi, 373 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Acknowledgments ix Introduction 3 PART ONE 23 Chapter 1. Origins: Poverty and Social Science in The Era of Progressive Reform 25 Chapter 2. Poverty Knowledge as Cultural Critique: The Great Depression 55 Chapter 3. From the Deep South to the Dark Ghetto: Poverty Knowledge, Racial Liberalism, and Cultural "Pathology" 74 Chapter 4. Giving Birth to a "Culture of Poverty": Poverty Knowledge in Postwar Behavioral Science, Culture, and Ideology 99 Chapter 5. Community Action 124 PART TWO 137 Chapter 6. In the Midst of Plenty: The Political Economy of Poverty in the Affluent Society 139 Chapter 7. Fighting Poverty with Knowledge: The Office of Economic Opportunity and the Analytic Revolution in Government 166 Chapter 8. Poverty's Culture Wars 196 PART THREE 211 Chapter 9. The Poverty Research Industry 213 Chapter 10. Dependency, the "Underclass, " and a New Welfare "Consensus": Poverty Knowledge for a Post-Liberal, Postindustrial Era 242 Chapter 11. The End of Welfare and the Case for a New Poverty Knowledge 284 Notes 297 Index 359.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691102559 20160528
Alice O'Connor here chronicles the transformation in the study of poverty from a reform-minded inquiry into the political economy of industrial capitalism to the detached, highly technical 1990s analysis of the demographic and behavioural characteristics of the poor. "Poverty Knowledge" is a comprehensive historical account of the thinking behind these very different views of "the poverty problem". It is a century-spanning inquiry into the politics, institutions, ideologies, and social science that shaped poverty research and policy.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691009179 20160528
Progressive-era "poverty warriors" cast poverty in America as a problem of unemployment, low wages, labor exploitation, and political disfranchisement. In the 1990s, policy specialists made "dependency" the issue and crafted incentives to get people off welfare. "Poverty Knowledge" gives the first comprehensive historical account of the thinking behind these very different views of "the poverty problem, " in a century-spanning inquiry into the politics, institutions, ideologies, and social science that shaped poverty research and policy. Alice O'Connor chronicles a transformation in the study of poverty, from a reform-minded inquiry into the political economy of industrial capitalism to a detached, highly technical analysis of the demographic and behavioral characteristics of the poor. Along the way, she uncovers the origins of several controversial concepts, including the "culture of poverty" and the "underclass." She shows how such notions emerged not only from trends within the social sciences, but from the central preoccupations of twentieth-century American liberalism: economic growth, the Cold War against communism, the changing fortunes of the welfare state, and the enduring racial divide.The book details important changes in the politics and organization as well as the substance of poverty knowledge. Tracing the genesis of a still-thriving poverty research industry from its roots in the War on Poverty, it demonstrates how research agendas were subsequently influenced by an emerging obsession with welfare reform. Over the course of the twentieth century, O'Connor shows, the study of poverty became more about altering individual behavior and less about addressing structural inequality. The consequences of this steady narrowing of focus came to the fore in the 1990s, when the nation's leading poverty experts helped to end "welfare as we know it." O'Connor shows just how far they had traveled from their field's original aims.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691102559 20160528
Education Library (Cubberley)
EDUC-232-01
Book
xix, 269 p. ; 24 cm.
For over a century, the idea that African Americans are psychologically damaged has played a role in discussions of race. This work argues that damage imagery has been the product of liberals and conservatives, and of racists and anti-racists.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780807823255 20160527
Education Library (Cubberley)
EDUC-232-01
Book
319 p. : ill. ; 18 cm.
Education Library (Cubberley)
EDUC-232-01
Book
351 p. illus. 25 cm.
Education Library (Cubberley)
EDUC-232-01