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Book
xv, 178 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Foreword: Roger Rossenthal Acknowledgments PART I: Tools to Support Use of this book Chapter 1: The Context in Educating Children of Migrant Farmworkers Chapter 2: The Tools of Cultural Proficiency for Educator Use Chapter 3: Learning Communities + Culturally Proficient Leadership = Students from Migrant Families Being Well Served Chapter 4: Educators' Rubric for Inclusion and Support of Migrant Education Students, Families and Communities - Moving Beyond Rhetoric PART II: Essential Elements Chapter 5: Assessing Cultural Knowledge-From Self-Centered Learning to Socially Just Student- and Community-Asset LearningChapter 6: Valuing Diversity is Reflected in the Beliefs and Values You and Your School's Hold and How You Share those Beliefs and Values with Your Community Chapter 7: Managing the Dynamics of Difference to Make a Difference Chapter 8: Adapting to the Diversity as a Team in the Schools and Communities We Serve Chapter 9: Institutionalizing Cultural Knowledge-for You, Your School, and the Migrant Communities You Serve PART III: Next Steps Chapter 10: Professional Communities Learning Together to Improve Migrant Student's Academic and Social Outcomes Appendix: Resources in Support of Migrant Education References About the Authors Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781475821123 20161205
General approaches to multiculturalism run the risk of overlooking an increasingly diverse student population that deserves special consideration and attention: students from immigrant backgrounds whose families toil the fields in order to provide better educational opportunities for their children. This book's purpose is to guide educators to think deeply about their roles and responsibilities in the education of children of farmworker families in our nation's schools. Readers will view their classrooms, schools, districts, and the migrant programs they lead in a broad and inclusive manner through the lens of cultural proficiency.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781475821123 20161205
Education Library (Cubberley)
EDUC-190
Book
xxiv, 234 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Foreword, by Philippe Bourgois Acknowledgments 1. Introduction: Worth Risking Your Life?" 2. We Are Field Workers": Embodied Anthropology of Migration 3. Segregation on the Farm: Ethnic Hierarchies at Work 4. How the Poor Suffer": Embodying the Violence Continuum 5. Doctors Don't Know Anything": The Clinical Gaze in Migrant Health 6. Because They're Lower to the Ground": Naturalizing Social Suffering 7. Conclusion: Change, Pragmatic Solidarity, and Beyond Appendix: On Methods and Contextual Knowledge Notes References Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520275140 20160612
This book is an ethnographic witness to the everyday lives and suffering of Mexican migrants. Based on five years of research in the field (including berry-picking and traveling with migrants back and forth from Oaxaca up the West Coast), Holmes, an anthropologist and MD in the mold of Paul Farmer and Didier Fassin, uncovers how market forces, anti-immigrant sentiment, and racism undermine health and health care. Holmes' material is visceral and powerful--for instance, he trekked with his informants illegally through the desert border into Arizona, where they were apprehended and jailed by the Border Patrol. After he was released from jail (and his companions were deported back to Mexico), Holmes interviewed Border Patrol agents, local residents, and armed vigilantes in the borderlands. He lived with indigenous Mexican families in the mountains of Oaxaca and in farm labor camps in the United States, planted and harvested corn, picked strawberries, accompanied sick workers to clinics and hospitals, participated in healing rituals, and mourned at funerals for friends. The result is a "thick description" that conveys the full measure of struggle, suffering, and resilience of these farmworkers. Fresh Fruit, Broken Bodies weds the theoretical analysis of the anthropologist with the intimacy of the journalist to provide a compelling examination of structural and symbolic violence, medicalization, and the clinical gaze as they affect the experiences and perceptions of a vertical slice of indigenous Mexican migrant farmworkers, farm owners, doctors, and nurses. This reflexive, embodied anthropology deepens our theoretical understanding of the ways in which socially structured suffering comes to be perceived as normal and natural in society and in health care, especially through imputations of ethnic body difference. In the vehement debates on immigration reform and health reform, this book provides the necessary stories of real people and insights into our food system and health care system for us to move forward to fair policies and solutions.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520275140 20160612
Education Library (Cubberley)
EDUC-190
Book
xv, 337 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Finding fresh fruits and vegetables is as easy as going to the supermarket for most Western Europeans - which makes it all too easy to forget that our food is cultivated, harvested, and packaged by farmworkers who labor for less pay, fewer benefits, and under more dangerous conditions than workers in almost any other sector of the world economy. Seeking to end the public's ignorance and improve workers' living and working conditions, this book addresses the major factors that affect farmworkers' lives while offering practical strategies for action on farmworker issues. The contributors to this book are all farmworker advocates - student and community activists and farmworkers themselves. Focusing on workers in the Southeast United States, a previously understudied region, they cover a range of issues, from labor organizing, to the rise of agribusiness, to current health, educational, and legal challenges faced by farmworkers. The authors blend coverage of each issue with practical suggestions for working with farmworkers and other advocates to achieve justice in our food system both regionally and nationally. Charles D. Thompson, Jr., is Director of Curriculum and Education at the Center for Documentary Studies, as well as an adjunct assistant professor in the Departments of Cultural Anthropology and Religion, at Duke University. Melinda F. Wiggins is Executive Director of Student Action with Farmworkers in Durham, North Carolina.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780292781771 20160528
Education Library (Cubberley)
EDUC-190