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Book
xxiv, 932 p. ; 24 cm.
  • The city on the hill, 1492-1707
  • Colonial adolescence, 1707-63
  • Colonies no more, 1763-83
  • A nation of law, 1776-89
  • Small republic, big shoulders, 1789-1815
  • The first era of big central government, 1815-36
  • Red foxes and bear flags, 1836-48
  • The house dividing, 1848-60
  • The crisis of the Union, 1860-65
  • Ideals and realities of Reconstruction, 1865-76
  • Lighting out for the territories, 1861-90
  • Sinews of democracy, 1876-96
  • "Building best, building greatly," 1896-1912
  • War, Wilson, and internationalism, 1912-20
  • The Roaring Twenties and the Great Crash, 1920-32
  • Enlarging the public sector, 1932-40 : The New Deal : immediate goals, unintended results
  • Democracy's finest hour, 1941-45
  • America's "happy days," 1946-59
  • The age of upheaval, 1960-74
  • Retreat and resurrection, 1974-88
  • The moral crossroads, 1989-2000
  • America, world leader, 2000 and beyond.
For the past three decades, many history professors have allowed their biases to distort the way America's past is taught. These intellectuals have searched for instances of racism, sexism, and bigotry in our history while downplaying the greatness of America's patriots and the achievements of "dead white men." As a result, more emphasis is placed on Harriet Tubman than on George Washington; more about the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II than about D-Day or Iwo Jima; more on the dangers we faced from Joseph McCarthy than those we faced from Josef Stalin."A Patriot's History of the United States "corrects those doctrinaire biases. In this groundbreaking book, America's discovery, founding, and development are reexamined with an appreciation for the elements of public virtue, personal liberty, and private property that make this nation uniquely successful. This book offers a long-overdue acknowledgment of America's true and proud history.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781595230324 20160608
Education Library (Cubberley)
EDUC-116N-01, HISTORY-116N-01
Book
volumes : ill., map ; 25 cm.
  • v. 1. From the age of discovery to a world at war, 1492-1914
  • v. 2. From a world at war to the triumph of freedom, 1914-1989
  • v. 3. From the collapse of communism to the rise of radical islam.
Green Library, Education Library (Cubberley)
EDUC-116N-01, HISTORY-116N-01
Video
1 videocassette (60 min.) : sd., col. with b&w sequences ; 1/2 in.
In the late 1940s the FBI nabbed Klaus Fuchs and Julius Rosenberg for giving atomic secrets to the Soviets. But only recently historians have discovered that as many as 300 Americans may have spied for the Soviets during WW II. Join NOVA for a look at this period of our history.
Media & Microtext Center
EDUC-116N-01, HISTORY-116N-01
Book
xviii, 936 p., [32] p. of plates : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
Between 1929 and 1945, two great travails were visited upon the American people: the Great Depression and World War II. Freedom from Fear tells the story of how Americans endured, and eventually prevailed, in the face of those unprecedented calamities. The Depression was both a disaster and an opportunity. As David Kennedy vividly demonstrates, the economic crisis of the 1930s was far more than a simple reaction to the alleged excesses of the 1920s. For more than a century before 1929, America's unbridled industrial revolution had gyrated through repeated boom and bust cycles, wastefullly consuming capital and inflicting untold misery on city and countryside alike. Nor was the fabled prosperity of the 1920s as uniformly shared a legend portrays. Countless Americans, especially if they were farmers, African Americans, or recent immigrants, eked out thread bare lives on the margins of national life. For them the Depression was but another of the ordeals of fear and insecurity with which they were sadly familiar. Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal wrung from the trauma of the 1930s a lasting legacy of economic and social reform, including the Social Security Act, new banking and financial laws, regulatory legislation, and new opportunities for organized labour. Taken together, those reforms gave a measure of security to millions of Americans who had never had much of it, and with a fresh sense of having a stake in their country. Freedom from Fear tells the story of the New Deal's achievements, without slighting its shortcomings, contradictions and failures. It is a story rich in drama and peopled with unforgettable personalities, including the incandescent but enigmatic figure of Roosevelt himself. Even as the New Deal was coping with the Depression, a still more fearsome menace was developing abroad - Hitler's thirst for war in Europe, coupled with the imperial ambitions of Japan in Asia. The same generation of Americans who battled the Depression eventually had to shoulder the arms in another conflict that wreaked world wide destruction, ushered in the nuclear age and forever changed their own way of life and their country's relationship to the rest of the world. Freedom from Fear explains how the nation agonized over its role in World War II, how it fought the war, why the United States won, and why the consequences of victory were sometimes sweet, sometimes ironic. In a compelling narrative, Kenney analyses the determinants of American strategy, the painful choices faced by commanders and statesmen, and the agonies inflicted on the millions of ordinary Americans who were compelled to swallow their fears and face battle as best they could. Freedom from Fear is a comprehensive and colourful account of the most convulsive period in American history, excepting only the Civil War - a period that formed the crucible in which modern America was formed.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195144031 20160528
Between 1929 and 1945, two great travails were visited upon the American people: the Great Depression and World War II. This text tells the story of how Americans endured, and eventually prevailed, in the face of those unprecedented calamities. The Depression was both a disaster and an opportunity. As the author demonstrates, the economic crisis of the 1930s was far more than a simple reaction to the alleged excesses of the 1920s. For more than a century before 1929, America's unbridled industrial revolution had gyrated through repeated boom and bust cycles, wastefully consuming capital and inflicting untold misery on city and countryside alike. Nor was the fabled prosperity of the 1920s as uniformly shared as legend portrays. Countless Americans, especially if they were farmers, African Americans, or recent immigrants, eked out threadbare lives on the margins of national life. For them, the Depression was but another of the ordeals of fear and insecurity with which they were sadly familiar.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195038347 20160528
hdl.handle.net ACLS Humanities E-Book
Green Library, Education Library (Cubberley)
EDUC-116N-01, HISTORY-116N-01
Book
xv, 1088 p. ; 25 cm.
  • Colonial America, 1580-1750
  • Revolutionary America, 1750-1815
  • Democratic America, 1815-1850
  • Civil War America, 1850-1870
  • Industrial America, 1870-1912
  • Melting-Pot America, 1912-1929
  • Superpower America, 1929-1960
  • Problem-solving, problem-creating America, 1960-1997.
The first and only conservative history of the United States -- from the bestselling, critically acclaimed author of Modern Times, The Birth of the Modern, and A History of the Jews. Historian Paul Johnson, "a latter day Mencken" (Foreign Affairs), whose remarkable works A History of the Jews and The Birth of the Modern were each hailed by the New York Times Book Review as "a tour de force", now offers readers a challenging, lucid, and multifaceted history of our nation from the first colonies to the 1996 elections from a uniquely conservative perspective. "The creation of the United States is the greatest of all human adventures", writes Paul Johnson, and this work is a reinterpretation of every aspect of American history -- its politics and economics; its art, literature, and science; its society and manners; and its complex and pervasive religious beliefs. Johnson tells the story in terms of the outstanding men and women who personally shaped and led the nation and also the ordinary people who have given the country its practical idealism and strength. This provocative portrayal of the "Great American Experiment" will be widely discussed and debated as it explores the relevant political and moral issues still shaping the nation today.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780060168360 20160527
Education Library (Cubberley)
EDUC-116N-01, HISTORY-116N-01
Book
x, 447 p. ; 21 cm.
Green Library, Education Library (Cubberley), SAL3 (off-campus storage)
EDUC-116N-01, HISTORY-116N-01