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Book
135 pages : illustrations ; 28 cm
Education Library (Cubberley)
EDUC-101-01
Book
xx, 452 p. : ill ; 26 cm.
This is an up-to-the-moment, engaging, multicultural introduction to education and teaching and the challenges and opportunities they present. Together, the four authors bring a rich blend of theory and practical application to this groundbreaking text. Jeannie Oakes is a leading education researcher and former director of the UCLA teacher education program. Martin Lipton is an education writer and consultant and has taught in public schools for 31 years. Lauren Anderson and Jamy Stillman are former public school teachers, now working as teacher educators. This unique, comprehensive foundational text considers the values and politics that pervade the U.S. education system, explains the roots of conventional thinking about schooling and teaching, asks critical questions about how issues of power and privilege have shaped and continue to shape educational opportunity, and presents powerful examples of real teachers working for equity and justice. Taking the position that a hopeful, democratic future depends on ensuring that all students learn, the text pays particular attention to inequalities associated with race, social class, language, gender, and other social categories and explores teachers' role in addressing them. The text provides a research-based and practical treatment of essential topics, and it situates those topics in relation to democratic values; issues of diversity; and cognitive, sociocultural, and constructivist perspectives on learning. The text shows how knowledge of education foundations and history can help teachers understand the organization of today's schools, the content of contemporary curriculum, and the methods of modern teaching. It likewise shows how teachers can use such knowledge when thinking about and responding to "headline" issues like charter schools, vouchers, standards, testing, and bilingual education, to name just a few. Central to this text is a belief that schools can and must be places of extraordinary educational quality and institutions in the service of social justice. Thus, the authors address head-on tensions between principles of democratic schooling and competition for always-scarce high-quality opportunities. Woven through the text are the voices of a diverse group of teachers, who share their analyses and personal anecdotes concerning what "teaching to change the world" means and involves.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781612052274 20160608
Education Library (Cubberley)
EDUC-101-01
Book
x, 374 p. : ill. ; 27 cm.
  • Learning : from speculation to science
  • How experts differ from novices
  • Learning and transfer
  • How children learn
  • Mind and brain
  • The design of learning environments
  • Effective teaching : examples in history, mathematics, and science
  • Teaching learning
  • Technology to support learning
  • Conclusions
  • Next Steps for Research.
This popular trade book, originally released in hardcover in the Spring of 1999, has been newly expanded to show how the theories and insights from the original book can translate into actions and practice, now making a real connection between classroom activities and learning behavior. This paperback edition includes far-reaching suggestions for research that could increase the impact that classroom teaching has on actual learning. Like the original hardcover edition, this book offers exciting new research about the mind and the brain that provides answers to a number of compelling questions. When do infants begin to learn? How do experts learn and how is this different from non-experts? What can teachers and schools do-with curricula, classroom settings, and teaching methods - to help children learn most effectively? New evidence from many branches of science has significantly added to our understanding of what it means to know, from the neural processes that occur during learning to the influence of culture on what people see and absorb. "How People Learn" examines these findings and their implications for what we teach, how we teach it, and how we assess what our children learn. The book uses exemplary teaching to illustrate how approaches based on what we now know result in in-depth learning. This new knowledge calls into question concepts and practices firmly entrenched in our current education system. The topics include: how learning actually changes the physical structure of the brain; how existing knowledge affects what people notice and how they learn; what the thought processes of experts tell us about how to teach; the amazing learning potential of infants; the relationship of classroom learning and everyday settings of community and workplace; learning needs and opportunities for teachers; and a realistic look at the role of technology in education.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780309070362 20160528
Education Library (Cubberley)
EDUC-101-01
Book
xii, 163 p. ; 24 cm.
A 1989 MacArthur Award recipient and kindergarten teacher examines the role of stories and storytelling in teaching young children and addresses the development of culture in the classroom.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674080300 20160527
Education Library (Cubberley)
EDUC-101-01
Education Library (Cubberley)
EDUC-101-01