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Book
vi, 263 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction: What's race got to do with it? : postwar German history in context / Rita Chin and Heide Fehrenbach
  • Black occupation children and the devolution of the Nazi racial state / Heide Fehrenbach
  • From victims to "homeless foreigners" : Jewish survivors in postwar Germany / Atina Grossmann
  • Guest worker migration and the unexpected return of race / Rita Chin
  • German democracy and the question of difference, 1945-1995 / Rita Chin and Heide Fehrenbach
  • The trouble with "race" : migrancy, cultural difference, and the remaking of Europe / Geoff Eley.
An investigation of the concept of "race" in post-Nazi Germanyat happened to 'race', race thinking, and racial distinctions in Germany, and Europe more broadly, after the demise of the Nazi racial state? "After the Nazi Racial State" investigates the afterlife of 'race' since 1945 and challenges the long-dominant assumption among historians that it disappeared from public discourse and policy-making with the defeat of the Third Reich and its genocidal European empire. Drawing on case studies of Afro-Germans, Jews, and Turks - arguably the three most important minority communities in postwar Germany - the authors detail continuities and change across the 1945 divide and offer the beginnings of a history of race and racialization after Hitler. This book explores why the concept of 'race' became taboo as a tool for understanding German society after 1945. Most crucially, it suggests the social and epistemic consequences of this determined retreat from "race" for Germany and Europe as a whole.Currently a Woodrow Wilson Center Fellow, Rita Chin is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Michigan. Heidi Fehrenbach is Presidential Research Professor at Northern Illinois University. Geoff Eley is Karl Pohrt Distinguished University Professor of Contemporary History at the University of Michigan. Atina Grossmann is Professor of History at Cooper Union.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780472116867 20160528
Green Library
CSRE-35S-01, FEMGEN-35S-01, HISTORY-35S-01
Book
155 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Green Library
CSRE-35S-01, FEMGEN-35S-01, HISTORY-35S-01
Book
261 p. ; 21 cm.
Green Library
CSRE-35S-01, FEMGEN-35S-01, HISTORY-35S-01
Book
ix, 165 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
That Gad Beck, a Jew in the Berlin of Nazi Germany, lived through the Holocaust at all is surprising. The fact that he lived it as a homosexual Jew who spent the entire war funnelling food, money and clothing to hidden Jews and helping smuggle others out of the country is amazing. It was love that gave him both the impetus and the strength to fight. The rise of National Socialism was tearing his family apart, destroying his school, thwarting his dream of emigration to Israel. Then the Nazis came for Manfred Lewin, Beck's first love, and for his family. Gad's love for Manfred gave him the courage to don a three-sizes-too-large Hitler Youth uniform, march into the transit camp where the Lewins were being held, and demand - and obtain, to his astonishment - the release of his lover. But Manfred would not leave without his family, and so went back into the camp. The Lewins did not survive. Coming of age as a gay man during the war and maintaining a series of romantic relationships while carrying on his resistance work, Beck reveals a tenacity and irrepressible spirit that is his real legacy. His determination to keep loving, living and believing in every human possibility without compromise - even in the face of the unthinkably monstrous - makes this quite a different story of the Holocaust.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780299165048 20160528
Green Library
CSRE-35S-01, FEMGEN-35S-01, HISTORY-35S-01
Book
xiv, 386 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • List of illustrations-- Foreword-- Acknowledgements-- Introduction: why another book on the Third Reich?-- Part I. The Setting: 1. How modern, German, and totalitarian was the Third Reich? Some major historiographical controversies-- 2. Barbarous utopias: racial idealogies in Germany-- 3. Barbarism institutionalised: racism as state policy-- Part II. The 'Purification' Of The Body Of The Nation: 4. The persecution of the Jews-- 5. The persecution of Sinti and Roma, and other ethnic minorities-- 6. The persecution of the 'hereditarily ill', the 'asocial', and homosexuals-- Part III. The Formation Of The 'National Community': 7. Youth in the Third Reich-- 8. Women in the Third Reich-- 9. Men in the Third Reich-- Conclusion: National Socialist racial and social policy-- Notes-- Bibliographical essay-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521391146 20160528
Between 1933 and 1945 the Nazi regime in Germany tried to restructure a 'class' society along racial lines. This book deals with the ideas and institutions which underpinned this mission, and shows how Nazi policy affected various groups of people, both victims and beneficiaries. The book begins with a serious discussion of the origins of Nazi racial ideology, and then demonstrates the thoroughness and purposiveness with which this was translated into official policy. The book deals with the systematic persecution not only of the Jews, the largest group of victims of Nazism, but also with the fate of lesser-known groups such as Sinti and Roma, the mentally handicapped, the 'asocial', and homosexuals. Finally, the book examines the racially-motivated social policies of the regime which affected every German 'national comrade'. The authors argue that the Third Reich was fundamentally different from other totalitarian regimes because of the all-encompassing nature of its racial policies. These were neither exclusively reactionary nor 'modern', but were rather an unprecedented form of progress into barbarism.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521391146 20160528
Green Library
CSRE-35S-01, FEMGEN-35S-01, HISTORY-35S-01