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Book
xviii, 390 pages : illustrations, maps ; 23 cm.
  • Part I: Making inequality, 1945-1968
  • Metropolitan visions of segregation and growth
  • Desegregation from tokenism to moderation
  • The curricular organization of segregated schooling
  • The spatial organization of schooling and urban renewal --Part II: Remaking inequality, 1968-1998
  • The road to busing
  • Busing resisted and transformed
  • Busing lived and imagined
  • Busing renegotiated
  • The long road to the end of desegregation
  • Conclusion.
In a radically unequal United States, schools are often key sites in which injustice grows. Ansley T. Erickson s "Making the Unequal Metropolis" presents a broad, detailed, and damning argument about the inextricable interrelatedness of school policies and the persistence of metropolitan-scale inequality. While many accounts of education in urban and metropolitan contexts describe schools as the victims of forces beyond their control, Erickson shows the many ways that schools have been intertwined with these forces and have in fact via land-use decisions, curricula, and other tools helped sustain inequality. Taking Nashville as her focus, Erickson uncovers the hidden policy choices that have until now been missing from popular and legal narratives of inequality. In her account, inequality emerges not only from individual racism and white communities resistance to desegregation, but as the result of long-standing linkages between schooling, property markets, labor markets, and the pursuit of economic growth. By making visible the full scope of the forces invested in and reinforcing inequality, Erickson reveals the complex history of, and broad culpability for, ongoing struggles in our schools.".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226025254 20160619
Education Library (Cubberley)
AFRICAAM-116-01, AMSTUD-216-01, CSRE-216X-01, EDUC-216-01, HISTORY-255E-01
Book
ix, 384 p. ; 25 cm.
  • INTRODUCTION FIVE MILES AWAY, A WORLD APART -- 1. Why Didn't Richmond Ever Desegregate? -- 2. From Consolidation to Reparation -- 3. Desegregating Dollars -- 4. Limited Choices -- 5. Lowering the Bar: The Standards and Testing Movement -- 6. In Search of Ties That Bind -- CONCLUSION FREEMAN AND TJ REVISITED.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195327380 20160604
How is it that half a century after Brown v. Board of Education-and in spite of increased funding for urban schools and programs like No Child Left Behind-educational opportunities for blacks and whites in America still remain so unequal? In Five Miles Away, A World Apart, James Ryan provides a sobering answer to this question by tracing the fortunes of two schools in Richmond, Virginia-one suburban, relatively affluent, and mostly white, and the other urban, relatively poor, and mostly black. Ryan shows how court rulings against desegregation in the 1970s laid the groundwork for the massive disparities between urban and suburban public school districts that persist to this day. The Nixon administration, intent on shoring up its base in the "silent majority, " allowed suburbs to lock nonresidents out of their school systems. Urban schools, whose student bodies were becoming increasingly poor and black, simply received more funding, a panacea that has proven largely ineffective, while the academic independence (and superiority) of suburban schools was held sacrosanct. Drawing on compelling interviews with students, teachers, and principals, including one who has been a principal at both schools featured in the book, Ryan explains how certain policies-school finance, school choice, and standardized testing-not only fail to bridge the performance gap between students at urban and suburban schools but actually perpetuate segregation across the country. Ryan closes by suggesting innovative reforms that would bring greater diversity into our schools by shifting the emphasis from racial to socioeconomic integration. An incisive critique of exactly how and why our educational policies have gone wrong, Five Miles Away, A World Apart will interest all those who wish to see our educational system heal the divide between rich and poor and live up to our highest democratic ideals.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195327380 20160604
Education Library (Cubberley)
AFRICAAM-116-01, AMSTUD-216-01, CSRE-216X-01, EDUC-216-01, HISTORY-255E-01
Book
xxviii, 688 p., [16] p. of plates : ill. ; 25 cm.
Sweet Land of Liberty is an epic, revelatory account of the abiding quest for justice in states from Illinois to New York, and of how the intense northern struggle differed from and was inspired by the fight down South.
Education Library (Cubberley)
AFRICAAM-116-01, AMSTUD-216-01, CSRE-216X-01, EDUC-216-01, HISTORY-255E-01
Book
viii, 376 p. : ill., ports. ; 25 cm.
In this groundbreaking book, Risa L. Goluboff offers a provocative new account of the history of American civil rights law. The Supreme Court's decision in Brown v. Board of Education has long dominated that history. Since 1954, generations of judges, lawyers, and ordinary people have viewed civil rights as a project of breaking down formal legal barriers to integration, especially in the context of public education. Goluboff recovers a world before Brown, a world in which civil rights was legally, conceptually, and constitutionally up for grabs. Then, the petitions of black agricultural workers in the American South and industrial workers across the nation called for a civil rights law that would redress economic as well as legal inequalities. Lawyers in the new Civil Rights Section of the Department of Justice and in the NAACP took the workers' cases and viewed them as crucial to attacking Jim Crow. By the time NAACP lawyers set out on the path to Brown, however, they had eliminated workers' economic concerns from their litigation agenda. When the lawyers succeeded in Brown, they simultaneously marginalized the host of other harms - economic inequality chief among them - that afflicted the majority of African Americans during the mid-20th Century. By uncovering the lost challenges workers and their lawyers launched against Jim Crow in the 1940s, Goluboff shows how Brown only partially fulfilled the promise of civil rights.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674024656 20160528
hdl.handle.net ACLS Humanities E-Book
Green Library, Education Library (Cubberley)
AFRICAAM-116-01, AMSTUD-216-01, CSRE-216X-01, EDUC-216-01, HISTORY-255E-01
Book
viii, 376 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
  • Transition, uncertainty, and the conditions for a new civil rights
  • Claiming rights in the agricultural South
  • Claiming rights in the industrial economy
  • The work of civil rights in the Department of Justice
  • A new deal for civil rights
  • Work and workers in the NAACP
  • Litigating labor in the wartime NAACP
  • Eliminating work from the NAACP's legal strategy
  • Brown and the remaking of civil rights.
In this groundbreaking book, Risa L. Goluboff offers a provocative new account of the history of American civil rights law. The Supreme Court's decision in Brown v. Board of Education has long dominated that history. Since 1954, generations of judges, lawyers, and ordinary people have viewed civil rights as a project of breaking down formal legal barriers to integration, especially in the context of public education. Goluboff recovers a world before Brown, a world in which civil rights was legally, conceptually, and constitutionally up for grabs. Then, the petitions of black agricultural workers in the American South and industrial workers across the nation called for a civil rights law that would redress economic as well as legal inequalities. Lawyers in the new Civil Rights Section of the Department of Justice and in the NAACP took the workers' cases and viewed them as crucial to attacking Jim Crow. By the time NAACP lawyers set out on the path to Brown, however, they had eliminated workers' economic concerns from their litigation agenda. When the lawyers succeeded in Brown, they simultaneously marginalized the host of other harms - economic inequality chief among them - that afflicted the majority of African Americans during the mid-20th Century. By uncovering the lost challenges workers and their lawyers launched against Jim Crow in the 1940s, Goluboff shows how Brown only partially fulfilled the promise of civil rights.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674024656 20160528
Education Library (Cubberley), Law Library (Crown)
AFRICAAM-116-01, AMSTUD-216-01, CSRE-216X-01, EDUC-216-01, HISTORY-255E-01
Book
xxx, 285 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
  • Editor's Note. Preface: Contesting the Color Line. 1: Race and the Schools Before Brown. 2: The Grass Roots and Struggling Lawyers. 3: The Court Decides. 4: Crossroads, 1954-55. 5: Southern Whites Fight Back. 6: Striving for Racial Balance in the 1960s. 7: The Buger Court Surprises. 8: Stalemates. 9: Resegregation?. 10: Legacies and Lessons. Appendix I: Key Cases. Appendix II: Tables and Figures. Notes. Bibliographical Essay. Acknowledgements. Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195127164 20160528
Many people were elated when Supreme Court Chief Justice Earl Warren delivered Brown versus Board of Education of Topeka in May 1954, the ruling that struck down state-sponsored racila segregation in America's public schools. Thurgood Marshall, chief attorney for the black families that launched the litigation, exclaimed later, "I was so happy, I was numb." The novelist Ralph Ellison wrote, "Another battle of the Civil War has been won. The rest is up to us and I'm very glad. What a wonderful world of possibilities are unfolded for the children!" Here, in a concise, narrative, Bancroft Prize-winning historian James T. Patterson takes readers through the dramatic case and its 50-year aftermath. A wide range of characters animates the story, from the little-known African-Americans who dared to challenge Jim Crow with lawsuits (at great personal cost); to Thurgood Marshall, who later became a Justice himself; to Earl Warren, who shephered a fractured Court to a unanimous decision.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195127164 20160528
Education Library (Cubberley)
AFRICAAM-116-01, AMSTUD-216-01, CSRE-216X-01, EDUC-216-01, HISTORY-255E-01
Book
xxx, 285 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
  • Editor's Note. Preface: Contesting the Color Line. 1: Race and the Schools Before Brown. 2: The Grass Roots and Struggling Lawyers. 3: The Court Decides. 4: Crossroads, 1954-55. 5: Southern Whites Fight Back. 6: Striving for Racial Balance in the 1960s. 7: The Buger Court Surprises. 8: Stalemates. 9: Resegregation?. 10: Legacies and Lessons. Appendix I: Key Cases. Appendix II: Tables and Figures. Notes. Bibliographical Essay. Acknowledgements. Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195127164 20160528
Many people were elated when Supreme Court Chief Justice Earl Warren delivered Brown versus Board of Education of Topeka in May 1954, the ruling that struck down state-sponsored racila segregation in America's public schools. Thurgood Marshall, chief attorney for the black families that launched the litigation, exclaimed later, "I was so happy, I was numb." The novelist Ralph Ellison wrote, "Another battle of the Civil War has been won. The rest is up to us and I'm very glad. What a wonderful world of possibilities are unfolded for the children!" Here, in a concise, narrative, Bancroft Prize-winning historian James T. Patterson takes readers through the dramatic case and its 50-year aftermath. A wide range of characters animates the story, from the little-known African-Americans who dared to challenge Jim Crow with lawsuits (at great personal cost); to Thurgood Marshall, who later became a Justice himself; to Earl Warren, who shephered a fractured Court to a unanimous decision.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195127164 20160528
Education Library (Cubberley)
AFRICAAM-116-01, AMSTUD-216-01, CSRE-216X-01, EDUC-216-01, HISTORY-255E-01
Book
xi, 373 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Acknowledgments ix Introduction 3 PART ONE 23 Chapter 1. Origins: Poverty and Social Science in The Era of Progressive Reform 25 Chapter 2. Poverty Knowledge as Cultural Critique: The Great Depression 55 Chapter 3. From the Deep South to the Dark Ghetto: Poverty Knowledge, Racial Liberalism, and Cultural "Pathology" 74 Chapter 4. Giving Birth to a "Culture of Poverty": Poverty Knowledge in Postwar Behavioral Science, Culture, and Ideology 99 Chapter 5. Community Action 124 PART TWO 137 Chapter 6. In the Midst of Plenty: The Political Economy of Poverty in the Affluent Society 139 Chapter 7. Fighting Poverty with Knowledge: The Office of Economic Opportunity and the Analytic Revolution in Government 166 Chapter 8. Poverty's Culture Wars 196 PART THREE 211 Chapter 9. The Poverty Research Industry 213 Chapter 10. Dependency, the "Underclass, " and a New Welfare "Consensus": Poverty Knowledge for a Post-Liberal, Postindustrial Era 242 Chapter 11. The End of Welfare and the Case for a New Poverty Knowledge 284 Notes 297 Index 359.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691102559 20160528
Alice O'Connor here chronicles the transformation in the study of poverty from a reform-minded inquiry into the political economy of industrial capitalism to the detached, highly technical 1990s analysis of the demographic and behavioural characteristics of the poor. "Poverty Knowledge" is a comprehensive historical account of the thinking behind these very different views of "the poverty problem". It is a century-spanning inquiry into the politics, institutions, ideologies, and social science that shaped poverty research and policy.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691009179 20160528
Progressive-era "poverty warriors" cast poverty in America as a problem of unemployment, low wages, labor exploitation, and political disfranchisement. In the 1990s, policy specialists made "dependency" the issue and crafted incentives to get people off welfare. "Poverty Knowledge" gives the first comprehensive historical account of the thinking behind these very different views of "the poverty problem, " in a century-spanning inquiry into the politics, institutions, ideologies, and social science that shaped poverty research and policy. Alice O'Connor chronicles a transformation in the study of poverty, from a reform-minded inquiry into the political economy of industrial capitalism to a detached, highly technical analysis of the demographic and behavioral characteristics of the poor. Along the way, she uncovers the origins of several controversial concepts, including the "culture of poverty" and the "underclass." She shows how such notions emerged not only from trends within the social sciences, but from the central preoccupations of twentieth-century American liberalism: economic growth, the Cold War against communism, the changing fortunes of the welfare state, and the enduring racial divide.The book details important changes in the politics and organization as well as the substance of poverty knowledge. Tracing the genesis of a still-thriving poverty research industry from its roots in the War on Poverty, it demonstrates how research agendas were subsequently influenced by an emerging obsession with welfare reform. Over the course of the twentieth century, O'Connor shows, the study of poverty became more about altering individual behavior and less about addressing structural inequality. The consequences of this steady narrowing of focus came to the fore in the 1990s, when the nation's leading poverty experts helped to end "welfare as we know it." O'Connor shows just how far they had traveled from their field's original aims.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691102559 20160528
Education Library (Cubberley)
AFRICAAM-116-01, AMSTUD-216-01, CSRE-216X-01, EDUC-216-01, HISTORY-255E-01
Book
xiv, 259 p. : ill., map ; 25 cm.
Recounts the history of one African-American school in the segregated American South which succeeded in providing nurturing educational environments in spite of the injustices of segregation. The book focuses on the importance of dedicated teachers and the principal and parents.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780807822760 20160527
Education Library (Cubberley)
AFRICAAM-116-01, AMSTUD-216-01, CSRE-216X-01, EDUC-216-01, HISTORY-255E-01
Book
xiv, 366 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Education Library (Cubberley)
AFRICAAM-116-01, AMSTUD-216-01, CSRE-216X-01, EDUC-216-01, HISTORY-255E-01
Education Library (Cubberley)
AFRICAAM-116-01, AMSTUD-216-01, CSRE-216X-01, EDUC-216-01, HISTORY-255E-01