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Book
xv, 229 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
  • Acknowledgments
  • Introduction: the power of algorithms
  • A society, searching
  • Searching for Black girls
  • Searching for people and communities
  • Searching for protections from search engines
  • The future of knowledge in the public
  • The future of information culture
  • Conclusion: algorithms of oppression
  • Epilogue
  • Notes
  • Bibliography
  • Index
  • About the author.
A revealing look at how negative biases against women of color are embedded in search engine results and algorithms Run a Google search for "black girls"-what will you find? "Big Booty" and other sexually explicit terms are likely to come up as top search terms. But, if you type in "white girls, " the results are radically different. The suggested porn sites and un-moderated discussions about "why black women are so sassy" or "why black women are so angry" presents a disturbing portrait of black womanhood in modern society. In Algorithms of Oppression, Safiya Umoja Noble challenges the idea that search engines like Google offer an equal playing field for all forms of ideas, identities, and activities. Data discrimination is a real social problem; Noble argues that the combination of private interests in promoting certain sites, along with the monopoly status of a relatively small number of Internet search engines, leads to a biased set of search algorithms that privilege whiteness and discriminate against people of color, specifically women of color. Through an analysis of textual and media searches as well as extensive research on paid online advertising, Noble exposes a culture of racism and sexism in the way discoverability is created online. As search engines and their related companies grow in importance-operating as a source for email, a major vehicle for primary and secondary school learning, and beyond-understanding and reversing these disquieting trends and discriminatory practices is of utmost importance. An original, surprising and, at times, disturbing account of bias on the internet, Algorithms of Oppression contributes to our understanding of how racism is created, maintained, and disseminated in the 21st century. Safiya Noble discusses search engine bias in an interview with USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781479837243 20180409
Engineering Library (Terman)
AFRICAAM-80Q-01, CS-80Q-01
Book
xv, 229 pages : illustrations, maps ; 23 cm
  • Introduction: The power of algorithms
  • A society, searching
  • Searching for Black girls
  • Searching for people and communities
  • Searching for protections from search engines
  • The future of knowledge in the public
  • The future of information culture
  • Conclusion: Algorithms of oppression
  • Epilogue.
A revealing look at how negative biases against women of color are embedded in search engine results and algorithms Run a Google search for "black girls"-what will you find? "Big Booty" and other sexually explicit terms are likely to come up as top search terms. But, if you type in "white girls, " the results are radically different. The suggested porn sites and un-moderated discussions about "why black women are so sassy" or "why black women are so angry" presents a disturbing portrait of black womanhood in modern society. In Algorithms of Oppression, Safiya Umoja Noble challenges the idea that search engines like Google offer an equal playing field for all forms of ideas, identities, and activities. Data discrimination is a real social problem; Noble argues that the combination of private interests in promoting certain sites, along with the monopoly status of a relatively small number of Internet search engines, leads to a biased set of search algorithms that privilege whiteness and discriminate against people of color, specifically women of color. Through an analysis of textual and media searches as well as extensive research on paid online advertising, Noble exposes a culture of racism and sexism in the way discoverability is created online. As search engines and their related companies grow in importance-operating as a source for email, a major vehicle for primary and secondary school learning, and beyond-understanding and reversing these disquieting trends and discriminatory practices is of utmost importance. An original, surprising and, at times, disturbing account of bias on the internet, Algorithms of Oppression contributes to our understanding of how racism is created, maintained, and disseminated in the 21st century. Safiya Noble discusses search engine bias in an interview with USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781479837243 20180409
Engineering Library (Terman)
AFRICAAM-80Q-01, CS-80Q-01
Book
viii, 306 pages ; 24 cm
  • Introduction: Not just a pretty face : tech's original sin
  • From nerd to bro : how tech bypassed women
  • The Paypal mafia and the myth of the meritocracy
  • Google : when good intentions aren't enough
  • The tipping point : women engineers speak out
  • Superheroes and superjerks : the role of the venture capitalists
  • Sex and the valley : men play, women pay
  • One hack doesn't fit all : how tech disrupts family
  • Escape from trolltopia : women's fight to save the internet
  • Silicon valley's second chance.
Silicon Valley is a modern utopia where anyone can change the world. Unless you're a woman. For women in tech, Silicon Valley is not a fantasyland of unicorns, virtual reality rainbows, and 3D-printed lollipops, where millions of dollars grow on trees. It's a "Brotopia, " where men hold all the cards and make all the rules. Vastly outnumbered, women face toxic workplaces rife with discrimination and sexual harassment, where investors take meetings in hot tubs and colleagues network over lunch at the local strip club. In this powerful expose, Bloomberg TV journalist Emily Chang reveals how Silicon Valley got so sexist despite its utopian ideals, why bro culture endures despite decades of companies claiming the moral high ground (Don't Be Evil! Connect the World!)--and how women are finally starting to speak out and fight back. Drawing on her deep network of Silicon Valley insiders, Chang opens the boardroom doors of male-dominated venture capital firms like Kleiner Perkins, the subject of Ellen Pao's high-profile gender discrimination lawsuit, and Sequoia, where a partner once famously said they "won't lower their standards" just to hire women. Interviews with Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg, YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki, and former Yahoo! CEO Marissa Mayer--who got their start at Google, where just one in five engineers is a woman--reveal just how hard it is to crack the Silicon Ceiling. And Chang shows how women such as former Uber engineer Susan Fowler, entrepreneur Niniane Wang, and game developer Brianna Wu, have risked their careers and sometimes their lives to pave a way for other women. Silicon Valley's aggressive, misogynistic, work-at-all costs culture has shut women out of the greatest wealth creation in the history of the world. It's time to break up the boys' club. Emily Chang shows us how to fix this toxic culture--to bring down Brotopia, once and for all.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780735213531 20180423
Engineering Library (Terman)
AFRICAAM-80Q-01, CS-80Q-01
Book
viii, 306 pages ; 24 cm
Silicon Valley is a modern utopia where anyone can change the world. Unless you're a woman. For women in tech, Silicon Valley is not a fantasyland of unicorns, virtual reality rainbows, and 3D-printed lollipops, where millions of dollars grow on trees. It's a "Brotopia, " where men hold all the cards and make all the rules. Vastly outnumbered, women face toxic workplaces rife with discrimination and sexual harassment, where investors take meetings in hot tubs and colleagues network over lunch at the local strip club. In this powerful expose, Bloomberg TV journalist Emily Chang reveals how Silicon Valley got so sexist despite its utopian ideals, why bro culture endures despite decades of companies claiming the moral high ground (Don't Be Evil! Connect the World!)--and how women are finally starting to speak out and fight back. Drawing on her deep network of Silicon Valley insiders, Chang opens the boardroom doors of male-dominated venture capital firms like Kleiner Perkins, the subject of Ellen Pao's high-profile gender discrimination lawsuit, and Sequoia, where a partner once famously said they "won't lower their standards" just to hire women. Interviews with Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg, YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki, and former Yahoo! CEO Marissa Mayer--who got their start at Google, where just one in five engineers is a woman--reveal just how hard it is to crack the Silicon Ceiling. And Chang shows how women such as former Uber engineer Susan Fowler, entrepreneur Niniane Wang, and game developer Brianna Wu, have risked their careers and sometimes their lives to pave a way for other women. Silicon Valley's aggressive, misogynistic, work-at-all costs culture has shut women out of the greatest wealth creation in the history of the world. It's time to break up the boys' club. Emily Chang shows us how to fix this toxic culture--to bring down Brotopia, once and for all.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780735213531 20180423
Engineering Library (Terman)
AFRICAAM-80Q-01, CS-80Q-01
Book
viii, 306 pages ; 24 cm
  • Not just a pretty face: tech's original sin
  • From nerd to bro : how tech bypassed women
  • The Paypal mafia and the myth of the meritocracy
  • Google: when good intentions aren't enough
  • The tipping point: women engineers speak out
  • Superheroes and superjerks: the role of the venture capitalists
  • Sex and the Valley: men play, women pay
  • One hack doesn't fit all: how tech disrupts family
  • Escape from trolltopia: women's fight to save the internet
  • Silicon Valley's second chance.
Silicon Valley is a modern utopia where anyone can change the world. Unless you're a woman. For women in tech, Silicon Valley is not a fantasyland of unicorns, virtual reality rainbows, and 3D-printed lollipops, where millions of dollars grow on trees. It's a "Brotopia, " where men hold all the cards and make all the rules. Vastly outnumbered, women face toxic workplaces rife with discrimination and sexual harassment, where investors take meetings in hot tubs and colleagues network over lunch at the local strip club. In this powerful expose, Bloomberg TV journalist Emily Chang reveals how Silicon Valley got so sexist despite its utopian ideals, why bro culture endures despite decades of companies claiming the moral high ground (Don't Be Evil! Connect the World!)--and how women are finally starting to speak out and fight back. Drawing on her deep network of Silicon Valley insiders, Chang opens the boardroom doors of male-dominated venture capital firms like Kleiner Perkins, the subject of Ellen Pao's high-profile gender discrimination lawsuit, and Sequoia, where a partner once famously said they "won't lower their standards" just to hire women. Interviews with Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg, YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki, and former Yahoo! CEO Marissa Mayer--who got their start at Google, where just one in five engineers is a woman--reveal just how hard it is to crack the Silicon Ceiling. And Chang shows how women such as former Uber engineer Susan Fowler, entrepreneur Niniane Wang, and game developer Brianna Wu, have risked their careers and sometimes their lives to pave a way for other women. Silicon Valley's aggressive, misogynistic, work-at-all costs culture has shut women out of the greatest wealth creation in the history of the world. It's time to break up the boys' club. Emily Chang shows us how to fix this toxic culture--to bring down Brotopia, once and for all.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780735213531 20180423
Engineering Library (Terman)
AFRICAAM-80Q-01, CS-80Q-01
Book
x, 342 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction: Britain's computer "revolution"
  • War machines: women's computing work and the underpinnings of the data-driven state, 1930-1946
  • Data processing in peacetime: institutionalizing a feminized machine underclass, 1946-1955
  • Luck and labor shortage: gender flux, professionalization, and growing opportunities for computer workers, 1955-1967
  • The rise of the technocrat: how state attempts to centralize power through computing went astray, 1965-1969
  • The end of white heat and the failure of British technocracy, 1969- 1979
  • Conclusion: reassembling the history of computing around gender's formative influence.
In 1944, Britain led the world in electronic computing. By 1974, the British computer industry was all but extinct. What happened in the intervening thirty years holds lessons for all postindustrial superpowers. As Britain struggled to use technology to retain its global power, the nation's inability to manage its technical labor force hobbled its transition into the information age. In Programmed Inequality, Marie Hicks explores the story of labor feminization and gendered technocracy that undercut British efforts to computerize. That failure sprang from the government's systematic neglect of its largest trained technical workforce simply because they were women. Women were a hidden engine of growth in high technology from World War II to the 1960s. As computing experienced a gender flip, becoming male-identified in the 1960s and 1970s, labor problems grew into structural ones and gender discrimination caused the nation's largest computer user -- the civil service and sprawling public sector -- to make decisions that were disastrous for the British computer industry and the nation as a whole. Drawing on recently opened government files, personal interviews, and the archives of major British computer companies, Programmed Inequality takes aim at the fiction of technological meritocracy. Hicks explains why, even today, possessing technical skill is not enough to ensure that women will rise to the top in science and technology fields. Programmed Inequality shows how the disappearance of women from the field had grave macroeconomic consequences for Britain, and why the United States risks repeating those errors in the twenty-first century.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780262035545 20170403
Engineering Library (Terman)
AFRICAAM-80Q-01, CS-80Q-01
Book
274 pages ; 25 cm
  • Prologue: "You fought so hard"
  • From China to Maplewood
  • Sleepless in New Jersey
  • Eating ice cream in hallways
  • Harvard Business School
  • Startup city
  • Adventure capital
  • Getting crushed
  • What a wonderful world
  • Whack-a-mole
  • The last straw
  • "Clean out your desk"
  • The glass cliff
  • The trial
  • Verdict and fallout
  • Project include
  • Epilogue: The future of tech.
"The co-founder of the diversity nonprofit Project Include shares the story behind her landmark 2015 lawsuit against powerhouse venture capitalist firm Kleiner Perkins, exploring what her case and refusal to settle revealed about Silicon Valley discrimination."-- Provided by publisher.
Engineering Library (Terman)
AFRICAAM-80Q-01, CS-80Q-01
Book
274 pages ; 25 cm
Engineering Library (Terman)
AFRICAAM-80Q-01, CS-80Q-01
Book
274 pages ; 25 cm
  • Prologue: "You fought so hard"
  • Part I: Chasing the American dream. From China to Maplewood ; Sleepless in New Jersey ; Eating ice cream in hallways ; Harvard Business School
  • Part II: Starting up in Silicon Valley. Startup city ; Adventure capital ; Getting crushed ; What a wonderful world ; Whack-a-mole ; The last straw
  • Part III: Hitting reset. "Clean out your desk" ; The glass cliff ; The trial ; Verdict and fallout ; Project Include
  • Epilogue: The future of tech
  • Advice for hitting reset.
The co-founder of the diversity nonprofit Project Include shares the story behind her landmark 2015 lawsuit against powerhouse venture capitalist firm Kleiner Perkins, exploring what her case and refusal to settle revealed about Silicon Valley discrimination.
Engineering Library (Terman)
AFRICAAM-80Q-01, CS-80Q-01
Book
232 pages ; 21 cm
  • Welcome to the machine
  • Culture misfit
  • Normal people
  • Select one
  • Delighted to death
  • Tracked, tagged, and targeted
  • Algorithmic inequity
  • Built to break
  • Meritocracy now, meritocracy forever
  • Technically dangerous.
Buying groceries, tracking our health, finding a date: whatever we want to do, odds are that we can now do it online. But few of us ask how all these digital products are designed or why. It's time we changed that. Many of the services we rely on are full of oversights, biases and downright ethical nightmares. Chatbots that harass women. Sign-up forms that fail anyone who's not straight. Social media sites that send messages about dead relatives. Algorithms that put more black people behind bars. Technically Wrong takes an unflinching look at the values, processes and assumptions that lead to these problems and more. Wachter-Boettcher demystifies the tech industry, leaving those of us on the other side of the screen better prepared to make informed choices about the services we use-and demand more from the companies behind them.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780393634631 20180430
Engineering Library (Terman)
AFRICAAM-80Q-01, CS-80Q-01