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Book
280 pages ; 23 cm
  • Introduction / Brian Boyd
  • Part 1. Upside down : matter to mind. Reflections on (and of) trees in Nabokov / Stephen H. Blackwell
  • Backward, contrariwise, downside up : thinking in different directions in Nabokov / Susan Elizabeth Sweeney
  • Belly and brain, mind and matter : an upside-down look at Nabokov's humor / Paul Benedict Grant
  • Some foodnotes to Nabokov's works / Lara Delage-Toriel
  • "I speak like a child" : orality in Nabokov / Monica Manolescu
  • Doubled vision : autoscopic phenomena in Nabokov's fiction / Naomi Olson
  • Restoration or regression? : the lure of the past in Nabokov's fiction / Julian W. Connolly
  • Masters and servants : upstairs and downstairs in Nabokov / Galya Diment
  • On pity and courtesy in Nabokov's ethics / Dana Dragunoiu
  • Part 2. Right way round : past to future. Nabokov and Hearn : where the transatlantic imagination meets the transpacific imagination / Shun'ichiro Akikusa
  • "And if my private universe scans right . . ." : the semantics of meter in Nabokov's poetry--and worldview / Stanislav Shvabrin
  • In search of the real poet : Nabokov's Pushkin essay revisited / David Rampton
  • Nabokov for those who hate him : the curious case of Pnin / Robert Alter
  • "My poet's fiery orb" : "Pale fire" and its creative context / R.S. Gwynn
  • From Onegin to Ada : Nabokov and the transnational imperative / Marijeta Bozovic
  • Turning the myth upside down : from Humbert and Lo to Hubert and Flo, or, Reading the particulars / Yannicke Chupin
  • Afterword / Brian Boyd.
Nabokov Upside Down brings together essays that explicitly diverge from conventional topics and points of reference when interpreting a writer whose influence on contemporary literature is unrivaled. Scholars from around the world here read Nabokov in terms of bodies rather than minds, belly-laughs rather than erudite wit, servants rather than master-artists, or Asian rather than Western perspectives. The first part of the volume is dedicated to surveys of Nabokov's oeuvre that transform some longheld assumptions concerning the nature of and significance of his work. Often thought of as among the most cerebral of artists, Nabokov comes across in these essays as profoundly aware of the physical world, as evidenced by his masterly representation of physical movement, his bawdy humor, and his attention to gustatory pleasure, among other aspects of his writing. The volume's second half focuses on individual works or phases in Nabokov's career, noting connections among them as well as to other fields of inquiry beyond literature. Engaged in conversation with each other and, in his editorial comments, with Brian Boyd, the essays in this volume show Nabokov scholarship continuing to renew itself.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780810134522 20170621
Green Library
COMPLIT-115-01, COMPLIT-315-01, SLAVIC-156-01, SLAVIC-356-01
Book
xii, 482 pages : ill. ; 25 cm
  • Introduction: 1,567 Days Part I: Postwar 1918: Shell Shock 1919: A Poet's Coup 1920: Moonshine Nation 1921: The End of Hope 1922: Renaissance in Harlem 1923: Beyond the Milky Way 1924: Men Behaving Badly 1925: Monkey Business 1926: Metropolis 1927: A Palace in Flames 1928: Boop-Boop-a-Doop! Part II: Prewar 1929: The Magnetic City 1930: Lili and the Blue Angel 1931: The Anatomy of Love in Italy 1932: Holodomor 1933: Pogrom of the Intellect 1934: Thank you, Jeeves 1935: Route 66 1936: Beautiful Bodies 1937: War Within a War 1938: Epilogue: Abide by Me.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780465022496 20160618
When the Great War ended in 1918, the West was broken. Religious faith, patriotism, and the belief in human progress had all been called into question by the mass carnage experienced by both sides. Shell shocked and traumatized, the West faced a world it no longer recognized: the old order had collapsed, replaced by an age of machines. The world hurtled forward on gears and crankshafts, and terrifying new ideologies arose from the wreckage of past belief. In Fracture, critically acclaimed historian Philipp Blom argues that in the aftermath of World War I, citizens of the West directed their energies inwards, launching into hedonistic, aesthetic, and intellectual adventures of self-discovery. It was a period of both bitter disillusionment and visionary progress. From Surrealism to Oswald Spengler's The Decline of the West; from Fritz Lang's Metropolis to theoretical physics, and from Art Deco to Jazz and the Charleston dance, artists, scientists, and philosophers grappled with the question of how to live and what to believe in a broken age. Morbid symptoms emerged simultaneously from the decay of World War I: progress and innovation were everywhere met with increasing racism and xenophobia. America closed its borders to European refugees and turned away from the desperate poverty caused by the Great Depression. On both sides of the Atlantic, disenchanted voters flocked to Communism and fascism, forming political parties based on violence and revenge that presaged the horror of a new World War. Vividly recreating this era of unparalleled ambition, artistry, and innovation, Blom captures the seismic shifts that defined the interwar period and continue to shape our world today.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780465022496 20160618
Green Library
COMPLIT-115-01, COMPLIT-315-01, SLAVIC-156-01, SLAVIC-356-01

3. Letters to Véra [2014]

Book
lxi, 797 pages : ill. ; 24 cm
This book was awarded Guardian Books of the Year 2014. No marriage of a major twentieth-century writer lasted longer than Vladimir Nabokov's. Vera Slonim shared his delight at the enchantment of life's trifles and literature's treasures, and he rated her as having the best and quickest sense of humour of any woman he had met. From their meeting in 1921, Vladimir's letters to his beloved Vera form a narrative arc that tells a forty-six year-long love story, and they are memorable in their entirety. Almost always playful, romantic, and pithy, the letters tell us much about the man and the writer; we see that Vladimir observed everything, from animals, faces, speech, and landscapes with genuine fascination.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780141192239 20160617
Green Library
COMPLIT-115-01, COMPLIT-315-01, SLAVIC-156-01, SLAVIC-356-01
Book
xi, 281 : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Acknowledgments Introduction PART I: THE ANDREEVS Chapter 1: The Early Visual Marketing of Leonid Andreev Chapter 2: Marketing Strategies: Vadim Andreev in Dialogue with the Soviet Union Chapter 3: The Role of the Scholar in the Consecration of Leonid Andreev (1950s to present) Chapter 4: Creating Posthumous Legacies: The Power to Consecrate and to Blaspheme. Vadim Andreev's Memories of Childhood Chapter 5: Market Pressures: Vadim Andreev's Incomplete Memoiristic Journey PART II: THE NABOKOVS Chapter 6: Nabokov and the Publishing Business Chapter 7: Plaster, Marble, Canon: The Vindication of Nabokov in Post-Soviet Russia Chapter 8: The Visual Marketing of Nabokov: Who is the Face of the Russian Lolita? Chapter 9: "Nabokov-7": Russian Postmodernism in Search of a National Identity Chapter 10: Interpreting Voids: Nabokov's Last Incomplete Novel, The Original of Laura Conclusion Bibliography About the Authors.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780739182604 20160612
Literature is not only about aesthetics, but also almost equally about economics. The successful marketing of an author and his literary works is more dependent on the activities of cultural merchants than on the particular words and phrases found in the author's prose. Marketing Literature and Posthumous Legacies focuses on the creation of symbolic capital for the literary legacies of Leonid Andreev and Vladimir Nabokov that was eventually exchanged by cultural merchants for financial and ideological profit. Yuri Leving and Frederick H. White discuss the ways in which certain cultural merchants created symbolic meaning for these two authors through a process of collusion, consecration, and the marketing of tangible and intangible products that lead to some sort of transaction. The promotion and maintenance of posthumous legacies involves an intricate network of personal interests that drive the preservation of literary reputations.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780739182604 20160612
Green Library
COMPLIT-115-01, COMPLIT-315-01, SLAVIC-156-01, SLAVIC-356-01
Book
xxvi, 534 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
This is a new systematisation of the main available data on Nabokov's most complex Russian novel, "The Gift" (1934-1939). From notes in Nabokov's private correspondence to scholarly articles accumulated during the seventy years since the novel's first appearance in print, the work draws from a broad spectrum of existing material in a succinct and coherent way, as well as providing innovative analyses.The first part of the monograph, The Novel, outlines the basic properties of "The Gift" ( plot, characters, style, and motifs) and reconstructs its internal chronology. The second part, "The Text, " describes the creation of the novel and the history of its publication, public and critical reaction, challenges of the English translation, and post-Soviet reception. Along with annotations to all five chapters of "The Gift", the commentary provides insight into problems of paleography, featuring unique textological analysis of the novel based on the author's study of the archival copy of the manuscript.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781934843116 20160527
Yuri Leving's "Keys to 'The Gift'" systematises in a succinct and coherent way the main available data on Nabokov's most complex Russian novel - "The Gift (1934-1939)" - from passing notes in the private correspondence to scholarly articles, accumulated during the seventy years since its first appearance in the print. Its first part, 'The Novel' outlines the basic properties of "The Gift": the plot, characters, style, and motifs, as well as reconstructs an internal chronology of the novel. The second part of the monograph, 'The Text' describes the creation of the novel and the history of its publication, public and critical reaction, challenges of the English translation, as well as its post-Soviet reception. Besides annotations to all five chapters of "The Gift", the 'Commentary' provides insights into problems of palaeography featuring unique textological analysis of "The Gift" based on the author's study of the archival copy of the manuscript.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781934843970 20160605
Green Library
COMPLIT-115-01, COMPLIT-315-01, SLAVIC-156-01, SLAVIC-356-01
Book
x, 308 p., [32] p. of plates : ill. ; 23 cm.
The term "Weimar culture, " while generally accepted, is in some respects unsatisfactory, if only because political and cultural history seldom coincides in time. Expressionism was not born with the defeat of the Imperial German army, nor is there any obvious connection between abstract painting and atonal music and the escape of the Kaiser, nor were the great scientific discoveries triggered off by the proclamation of the Republic in 1919. As the eminent historian Walter Laqueur demonstrates, the avant-gardism commonly associated with post-World War One precedes the Weimar Republic by a decade. It would no doubt be easier for the historian if the cultural history of Weimar were identical with the plays and theories of Bertolt Brecht; the creations of the Bauhaus and the articles published by the Weltbuhne. But there were a great many other individuals and groups at work, and Laqueur gives a full and vivid accounting of their ideas and activities. The realities of Weimar culture comprise the political right as well as the left, the universities as well as the literary intelligentsia. It would not be complete without occasional glances beyond avant-garde thought and creation and their effects upon traditional German social and cultural attitudes and the often violent reactions against "Weimar" that would culminate with the rise of Hitler and the fall of the republic in 1933. This authoritative work is of immense importance to anyone interested in the history of Germany in this critical period of the country's life.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781412818438 20160607
Green Library
COMPLIT-115-01, COMPLIT-315-01, SLAVIC-156-01, SLAVIC-356-01
Book
viii, 305 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
  • A filthy look at Shakespeare's Lolita
  • Art as afterglow (Bend sinister)
  • Perversion in Pnin
  • Hermophobia (on sexual orientation and reading Nabokov)
  • Reading Chernyshevsky in Tehran : Nabokov and Nafisi
  • Lolita in the real world
  • Blackwell's Paradox and Fyodor's Gift : a kinder and gentler Nabokov
  • Litland : the allegorical poetics of The defense
  • The costs of character : the maiming of the narrator in "A guide to Berlin"
  • The meaning of "life" : Nabokov in code (King, queen, knave and Ada)
  • Epilogue : what if Nabokov had written "The double" : reading Dostoevsky after Nabokov.
Green Library
COMPLIT-115-01, COMPLIT-315-01, SLAVIC-156-01, SLAVIC-356-01
Book
xi, 312 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
  • Illustrations vii Acknowledgments ix Introduction 1 Chapter 1: The War at Home 7 The Wounded Soldier 8 The Spirit of 1914 16 Film and Nation 20 The Battle of Images 25 A Medium for Deception 29 The New Empire 34 Mental Breakdowns 37 Chapter 2: Tales from the Asylum 45 War Neurotics 46 Recovering the Past 49 Phantoms and Freaks 55 From Dr. Charcot to Dr. Caligari 63 Madness as Resistance 71 The Hitler Connection 75 Shattered Space 81 Chapter 3: The Return of the Undead 87 The Lost Generation 88 Mass Death 93 Dracula Revisited 98 A Community under Siege 108 Hysteria on the Home Front 113 The Allure of the Occult 120 The Work of Mourning 127 Chapter 4: Myth, Murder, and Revenge 131 The National Project 132 Posing for Germany 135 The Will to Form 141 The Fallen Hero 145 Excursus: Lang in World War I 151 The Sacred Battle 153 The End of Violence 157 Chapter 5: The Industrial Battlefield 167 Rise of the Machines 168 Moloch War 175 Lang's America 181 The Hunger for Religion 186 The Workers' Revolt 193 Destruction and Regeneration 200 Aftershocks 205 Conclusion 211 Notes 217 Weimar Cinema on DVD 251 Bibliography 267 Shell Shock and Trauma Theory 267 World War I and the Weimar Republic 272 Weimar Film History 278 Films Discussed 283 Index 299.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691031361 20160528
"Shell Shock Cinema" explores how the classical German cinema of the Weimar Republic was haunted by the horrors of World War I and the trauma of Germany's humiliating defeat. In this exciting new book, Anton Kaes argues that masterworks such as "The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari", "Nosferatu", "The Nibelungen", and "Metropolis", even though they do not depict battle scenes or soldiers in combat, engaged the war and registered its tragic aftermath. These films reveal a wounded nation in post-traumatic shock, reeling from a devastating defeat that it never officially acknowledged, let alone accepted. Kaes uses the term 'shell shock' - coined during World War I to describe soldiers suffering from nervous breakdowns - as a metaphor for the psychological wounds that found expression in Weimar cinema. Directors like Robert Wiene, F. W. Murnau, and Fritz Lang portrayed paranoia, panic, and fear of invasion in films peopled with serial killers, mad scientists, and troubled young men. Combining original close analysis with extensive archival research, Kaes shows how this cinema of shell shock transformed extreme psychological states into visual expression; how it pushed the limits of cinematic representation with its fragmented story lines, distorted perspectives, and stark lighting; and, how it helped create a modernist film language that anticipated film noir and remains incredibly influential today. A compelling contribution to the cultural history of trauma, "Shell Shock Cinema" exposes how German film gave expression to the loss and acute grief that lay behind Weimar's sleek facade.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691031361 20160528
Green Library
COMPLIT-115-01, COMPLIT-315-01, SLAVIC-156-01, SLAVIC-356-01
Book
30 p. : col. ill.
eReserve
COMPLIT-115-01, COMPLIT-315-01, SLAVIC-156-01, SLAVIC-356-01
Book
xxiii, 258 p. ; 23 cm.
  • Chronology-- Introduction: the many faces of Vladimir Nabokov Julian W. Connolly-- Part I. Contexts: 1. Strong opinions and nerve points: Nabokov's life and art Zoran Kuzmanovich-- 2. Nabokov as storyteller Brian Boyd-- 3. Nabokov as a Russian writer Alexander Dolinin-- 4. 'By some sleight of land': how Nabokov rewrote America Susan Elizabeth Sweeney-- 5. Nabokov and modernism John Burt Foster, Jr.-- Part II. Works: 6. Nabokov as poet Barry Scherr-- 7. Nabokov's short fiction Priscilla Meyer-- 8. The major Russian novels Julian W. Connolly-- 9. From Sirin to Nabokov: the transition to English Neil Cornwell-- 10. Nabokov's biographical impulse: art of writing lives Galya Diment-- 11. The Lolita phenomenon from Paris to Tehran Ellen Pifer-- 12. Nabokov's late fiction Michael Wood-- Part III. Related Worlds: 13. Nabokov and cinema Barbara Wyllie-- 14. Nabokov's world view Leona Toker-- A guide to further reading.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521536431 20160528
Vladimir Nabokov held the unique distinction of being one of the most important writers of the twentieth century in two separate languages, Russian and English. Known for his verbal mastery and bold plots, Nabokov fashioned a literary legacy that continues to grow in significance. This volume offers a concise and informative introduction into the author's fascinating creative world. Specially commissioned essays by distinguished scholars illuminate numerous facets of the writer's legacy, from his early contributions as a poet and short-story writer to his dazzling achievements as one of the most original novelists of the twentieth century. Topics receiving fresh coverage include Nabokov's narrative strategies, the evolution of his world-view, and his relationship to the literary and cultural currents of his day. The volume also contains valuable supplementary material such as a chronology of the writer's life and a guide to further critical reading.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521536431 20160528
Green Library
COMPLIT-115-01, COMPLIT-315-01, SLAVIC-156-01, SLAVIC-356-01
Book
xi, 316 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Exilic Experience As A Cultural Construct-- The Surrealist Adventure Of Boris Poplavskii-- The Prodigal Children Of Marcel Proust-- The Esthetics Of Disintegration-- The Art Of Writing A Novel.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780299185107 20160528
Here, reintroduced into literary circulation, is an ignored yet rich and original page in Russian literary history - the "unnoticed generation" of Russian writers who took up residence in France after the Bolshevik coup of 1917. Leonid Lavik analyses the position of these writers in the context of French modernist literature, examining the ways in which French literary life influenced emigre artistic identities and oeuvre. The book challenges commonly accepted notions of emigre isolation from French literature and culture and is instrumental in reaching a fuller understanding of the cultural mechanisms involved in the effort by an expatriate community to carry on a creative existence.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780299185107 20160528
Green Library
COMPLIT-115-01, COMPLIT-315-01, SLAVIC-156-01, SLAVIC-356-01

12. Nabokov at Cornell [2003]

Book
288 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 24 cm.
Green Library
COMPLIT-115-01, COMPLIT-315-01, SLAVIC-156-01, SLAVIC-356-01
Book
xvi, 205 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
Green Library
COMPLIT-115-01, COMPLIT-315-01, SLAVIC-156-01, SLAVIC-356-01
Book
xix, 396 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
This is a choice magazine outstanding academic book. A century after his birth, Vladimir Nabokov (1899-1977) remains controversial, provocative, and "cool." Yet while he receives acclaim as a major American writer, few of his admirers in the West know the unique place he occupies in his native Russian tradition. In this captivating interpretation of Nabokov's career through the prism of his short fiction, Maxim D. Shrayer explores how Nabokov eclipsed the achievements of the great Russian masters of the short story, Anton Chekhov and Ivan Bunin, with whom he maintained a dialogic relationship even as he became - in exile from Russia and his native tradition - an American writer. A native of Moscow and naturalized U.S. citizen, Maxim D. Shrayer is the author of three collections of verse and of Russian Poet/Soviet Jew. He teaches literature at Boston College.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780292777330 20160528
Green Library
COMPLIT-115-01, COMPLIT-315-01, SLAVIC-156-01, SLAVIC-356-01
Book
xlix, 798 p. ; 24 cm.
Green Library
COMPLIT-115-01, COMPLIT-315-01, SLAVIC-156-01, SLAVIC-356-01
Book
213 p.
In a book that confronts our society's obsession with sexual violence, Maria Tatar seeks the meaning behind one of the most disturbing images of twentieth-century Western culture: the violated female corpse. This image is so prevalent in painting, literature, film, and, most recently, in mass media, that we rarely question what is at stake in its representation. Tatar, however, challenges us to consider what is taking place, both artistically and socially, in the construction and circulation of scenes depicting sexual murder. In examining images of sexual murder ("lustmord"), she produces a riveting study of how art and murder have intersected in the sexual politics of culture from Weimar Germany to the present. Tatar focuses attention on the politically turbulent Weimar Republic, often viewed as the birthplace of a transgressive avant-garde modernism, where representations of female sexual mutilation abound. Here a revealing episode in the gender politics of cultural production unfolds as male artists and writers, working in a society consumed by fear of outside threats, envision women as enemies that can be contained and mastered through transcendent artistic expression. Not only does Tatar show that male artists openly identified with real-life sexual murderers - George Grosz posed as Jack the Ripper in a photograph where his model and future wife was the target of his knife - but she also reveals the ways in which victims were disavowed and erased. Tatar first analyzes actual cases of sexual murder that aroused wide public interest in Weimar Germany. She then considers how the representation of murdered women in visual and literary works functions as a strategy for managing social and sexual anxieties, and shows how violence against women can be linked to the war trauma, to urban pathologies, and to the politics of cultural production and biological reproduction.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691043388 20160528
Green Library
COMPLIT-115-01, COMPLIT-315-01, SLAVIC-156-01, SLAVIC-356-01
Book
x, 310 p.
  • Introduction: Sites of Memory-- Part I. Catostrophe and consolation: 1. Homecomings: the return of the dead-- 2. Communities in mourning-- 3. Spiritualism and the 'Lost Generation' 4. War memorials and the mourning process-- Part II. Cultural codes and languages of mourning: 5. Mythologies of war: films, popular religion, and the business of the sacred-- 6. The apocalytic imagination in art: from anticipation to allegory-- 7. The apocalytic imagination in war literature-- 8. War poetry, romanticism, and the return of the sacred-- 9. Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521496827 20160528
Jay Winter's powerful new study of the 'collective remembrance' of the Great War offers a major reassessment of one of the critical episodes in the cultural history of the twentieth century. Using a great variety of literary, artistic and architectural evidence, Dr Winter looks anew at the culture of commemoration, and the ways in which communities endeavoured to find collective solace after 1918. Taking issue with the prevailing 'Modernist' interpretation of the European reaction to the appalling events of 1914-1918, Dr Winter instead argues that what characterised that reaction was, rather, the attempt to interpret the Great War within traditional frames of reference. Tensions arose, inevitably. Sites of Memory, Sites of Mourning is a profound and moving book of seminal importance for the attempt to understand the course of European history during the first half of the twentieth century.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521496827 20160528
Green Library
COMPLIT-115-01, COMPLIT-315-01, SLAVIC-156-01, SLAVIC-356-01
Book
806 p.
A laboratory for competing visions of modernity, the Weimar Republic (1918-1933) continues to haunt the imagination of the twentieth century. Its political and cultural lessons retain uncanny relevance for all who seek to understand the tensions and possibilities of our age. "The Weimar Republic Sourcebook" represents the most comprehensive documentation of Weimar culture, history, and politics assembled in any language. It invites a wide community of readers to discover the richness and complexity of the turbulent years in Germany before Hitler's rise to power.Drawing from such primary sources as magazines, newspapers, manifestos, and official documents (many unknown even to specialists and most never before available in English), this book challenges the traditional boundaries between politics, culture, and social life. Its thirty chapters explore Germany's complex relationship to democracy, ideologies of "reactionary modernism, " the rise of the "New Woman, " Bauhaus architecture, the impact of mass media, the literary life, the tradition of cabaret and urban entertainment, and the situation of Jews, intellectuals, and workers before and during the emergence of fascism.While devoting much attention to the Republic's varied artistic and intellectual achievements (the Frankfurt School, political theater, twelve-tone music, cultural criticism, photomontage, and urban planning), the book is unique for its inclusion of many lesser-known materials on popular culture, consumerism, body culture, drugs, criminality, and sexuality; it also contains a timetable of major political events, an extensive bibliography, and capsule biographies. This will be a major resource and reference work for students and scholars in history; art; architecture; literature; social and political thought; and cultural, film, German, and women's studies.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520067745 20160528
Green Library
COMPLIT-115-01, COMPLIT-315-01, SLAVIC-156-01, SLAVIC-356-01
Book
279 p.
  • Dedication-- Acknowledgements-- Introduction-- 1. The quest of the other-- 2. Altering the themes of life-- 3. The evil differentiation of shadows-- 4. A fondness for the mask-- 5. Dimming the bliss of Narcissus-- 6. The struggle for autonomy-- 7. The transforming rays of creative consciousness-- Notes-- Abbreviation-- Bibliography of works cited.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521411356 20160528
This book traces the evolution of Vladimir Nabokov's prose fiction from the mid-1920s to the late 1930s. While individual works by Nabokov have attracted extensive commentary, the precise contours of Nabokov's development as a writer of fiction have received little attention. Julian Connolly traces this development by focusing on a crucial subject: the relationship between self and other in its various forms (including character to character, character to author, author to reader). At the core of Professor Connolly's analysis is the discovery of a powerful structure of bifurcation in Nabokov's work, between the character dimensions of a protagonist's identity and its latent authorial dimensions. As Nabokov's works grow more sophisticated, the author manipulates the relationship between these two dimensions, creating a series of memorable characters who seek to attain the status of authentic author by shedding that aspect of the self which functions as a character. Julian Connolly's investigation into the relationship between self and other in the early fiction provides an original model for approaching all of Nabokov's fictional writing, and constitutes a major contribution to Nabokov scholarship.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521411356 20160528
Green Library
COMPLIT-115-01, COMPLIT-315-01, SLAVIC-156-01, SLAVIC-356-01
Book
xiv, 783 p.
Green Library
COMPLIT-115-01, COMPLIT-315-01, SLAVIC-156-01, SLAVIC-356-01