%{search_type} search results

11 catalog results

RSS feed for this result
Book
xxv, 486 pages : maps ; 23 cm
  • History, historiography, and the Bible. The death of biblical history? ; Knowing and believing : faith in the past ; Knowing about the history of Israel ; Narrative and history : stories about the past ; A biblical history of Israel
  • A history of Israel from Abraham to the Persian period. Before the land ; The settlement in the land ; The early monarchy ; the later monarchy : Solomon ; The later monarchy : the divided kingdoms ; Exile and after ; Concluding reflections
  • Appendix. In praise of critical thought : a response to our critics
  • Index of biblical passages
  • Index of scholars cited
  • Index of selected topics.
For over a decade, A Biblical History of Israel has gathered praise and criticism for its unapologetic approach to reconstructing the historical landscape of ancient Israel through a biblical lens. In this much-anticipated second edition, the authors reassert that the Old Testament should be taken seriously as a historical document alongside other literary and archaeological sources. Significantly revised and updated, A Biblical History of Israel, Second Edition includes the authors' direct response to critics. In part 1, the authors review scholarly approaches to the historiography of ancient Israel and negate arguments against using the Bible as a primary source. In part 2, they outline a history of ancient Israel from 2000 to 400 BCE by integrating both biblical and extrabiblical sources. The second edition includes updated archaeological data and new references. The text also provides seven maps and fourteen tables as useful references for students.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780664239138 20160619
Green Library
CLASSICS-81-01, HISTORY-117-01
Book
xx, 237 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm.
  • List of Illustrations xi Series Editor's Foreword xiii Preface xv Acknowledgments xix PROLOGUE The Collapse of Civilizations: 1177 BC 1 CHAPTER ONE Act I. Of Arms and the Man: The Fifteenth Century BC 14 CHAPTER TWO Act II. An (Aegean) Affair to Remember: The Fourteenth Century BC 43 CHAPTER THREE Act III. Fighting for Gods and Country: The Thirteenth Century BC 73 CHAPTER FOUR Act IV. The End of an Era: The Twelfth Century BC 102 CHAPTER FIVE A "Perfect Storm" of Calamities? 139 EPILOGUE The Aftermath 171 Dramatis Personae 177 Notes 181 Bibliography 201 Index 229.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691140896 20160613
In 1177 B.C., marauding groups known only as the "Sea Peoples" invaded Egypt. The pharaoh's army and navy managed to defeat them, but the victory so weakened Egypt that it soon slid into decline, as did most of the surrounding civilizations. After centuries of brilliance, the civilized world of the Bronze Age came to an abrupt and cataclysmic end. Kingdoms fell like dominoes over the course of just a few decades. No more Minoans or Mycenaeans. No more Trojans, Hittites, or Babylonians. The thriving economy and cultures of the late second millennium B.C., which had stretched from Greece to Egypt and Mesopotamia, suddenly ceased to exist, along with writing systems, technology, and monumental architecture. But the Sea Peoples alone could not have caused such widespread breakdown. How did it happen? In this major new account of the causes of this "First Dark Ages, " Eric Cline tells the gripping story of how the end was brought about by multiple interconnected failures, ranging from invasion and revolt to earthquakes, drought, and the cutting of international trade routes. Bringing to life the vibrant multicultural world of these great civilizations, he draws a sweeping panorama of the empires and globalized peoples of the Late Bronze Age and shows that it was their very interdependence that hastened their dramatic collapse and ushered in a dark age that lasted centuries. A compelling combination of narrative and the latest scholarship, 1177 B.C. sheds new light on the complex ties that gave rise to, and ultimately destroyed, the flourishing civilizations of the Late Bronze Age-and that set the stage for the emergence of classical Greece.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691140896 20160613
Green Library
CLASSICS-81-01, HISTORY-117-01
Book
ii, 576 pages : ill., maps ; 28 cm
  • Contents Maps Preface About the Authors Credits 1. A Small, Far-Off Land Historical Sketch Why Study the Greeks? Who Were the Greeks? The Structure of This Book: History, Culture, and Society Key Terms Further Reading 2. Country and People Greek Geography, Climate, and Agriculture Demography Migration Health and Disease Nutrition Economic Growth in Ancient Greece Key Terms Further Reading 3. The Greeks at Home Gender Relationships: Ideals and Realities Sexuality Adults and Children Key Terms Further Reading 4. The Greeks Before History, 12,000-1200 B.C. The End of the Last Ice Age, 12,000-11,000 B.C. The Origins of Agriculture, 11,000-5000 B.C. Greeks and Indo-Europeans Neolithic Society and Economy, 5000-3000 B.C. The Early Bronze Age, 3000-2300 B.C. The Middle Bronze Age, 2300-800 B.C. The Age of Minoan Palaces, 2000-600 B.C. The Rise of Mycenaean Greece, 1750-500 B.C. The End of Minoan Civilization, 1600-1400 B.C. Mycenaean Greece: Archaeology, Linear B, and Homer The End of the Bronze Age, circa 200 B.C. Key Terms Further Reading 5. The Dark Age, 1200-800 B.C. The Collapse of the Old States Life Among the Ruins Dark Age Heroes Art and Trade in the Dark Age The Eighth-Century Renaissance: Economy The Eighth-Century Renaissance: Society The Eighth-Century Renaissance: Culture Conclusion Key Terms Further Reading 6. Homer The Homeric Question Milman Parry and Oral Poetry The Oral Poet in Homer Heinrich Schliemann and the Trojan War The Tragic Iliad Homer and the Invention of Plot The Comic Odyssey Odysseus and Homer Key Terms Further Reading 7. Religion and Myth Definitions of Religion and Myth Hesiod's Myth of the Origin of the Gods Greek Religion in History Forms of Greek Religious Practice Hesiod's Myth of Sacrifice Gods and Other Mysterious Beings Chthonic Religion The Ungrateful Dead and the Laying of the Ghost Ecstatic and Mystical Religion Conclusion Key Terms Further Reading 8. Ancient Greece, 800-480 B.C.: Economy, Society, Politics Government by Oligarchy Elite Culture The Tyrants The Structure of Archaic States Conclusion Key Terms Further Reading 9. The Archaic Cultural Revolution, 700-480 B.C. Natural Philosophy in Miletus Pythagoras: Philosophy and Social Science in the West Hecataeus, Herodotus, and Historie Lyric poets Material Culture Art and Thought in Sixth-Century Greece Key Terms Further Reading 10. A Tale of Two Archaic Cities: Sparta and Athens, 700-480 B.C. Sparta Spartiates, Perioikoi, and Helots Plutarch's Sparta Spartan Government Athens The Seventh-Century Crisis Solon Pisistratus and the Consequences of Solon's Reforms Demokratia Athens Submits to Persia Key Terms Further Reading 11. Persia and the Greeks, 550-490 B.C. Empires of the Ancient Near East Lydia Cyrus and the Rise of Persia, 559-530 B.C. Cambyses and Darius, 530-52 B.C. Persia's Northwest Frontier and the Ionian Revolt, 52-494 B.C. The Battle of Marathon, 490 B.C. Key Terms Further Reading 12. The Great War, 480-479 B.C. Storm Clouds in the West Storm Clouds in the East The Storm Breaks in the West: The Battle of Himera, 480 B.C. The Storm Breaks in the East: The Battle of Thermopylae, 480 B.C. The Fall of Athens The Battle of Salamis The End of the Storm: Battles of Plataea and Mycale, 479 B.C. Conclusion Key Terms Further Reading 13. Democracy and Empire-- Athens and Syracuse, 479-431 B.C. The Expansion of the Syracusan State, 479-461 B.C. The Western Democracies, 461-433 B.C. Economic Growth in Western Greece, 479-433 B.C. Cimon and the Creation of the Athenian Empire, 478-461 B.C. The First Peloponnesian War, 460-446 B.C. Pericles and the Consolidation of Athenian Power, 446-433 B.C. Economic Growth in the Aegean The Edge of the Abyss, 433-431 B.C. Key Terms Further Reading 14. Art and Thought in the Fifth Century B.C. Philosophy Material Culture Key Terms Further Reading 15. Fifth-Century Drama Tragedy The City of Dionysia The Theater of Dionysus Narrative Structure Character and Other Dimensions of Tragedy Tragic Plots Conclusion The Origins of Comedy The Plots of Old Comedy The Structures of Old Comedy Conclusion Key Terms Further Reading 16. The Peloponnesian War and Its Aftermath, 431-399 B.C. The Archidamian War, 431-421 B.C. The Peace of Nicias and the Sicilian Expedition, 421-413 B.C. Sicily and the Carthaginian War, 412-404 B.C. The Ionian War, 412-404 B.C. Aftermath, 404-399 B.C. Conclusion Key Terms Further Reading 17. The Greeks between Persia and Carthage, 399-360 B.C. Sparta's Empire, 404-360 B.C. Economy, Society, and War Sparta's Collapse, 371 B.C. Anarchy in the Aegean, 371-360 B.C. Carthage and Syracuse, 404-360 B.C. The Golden Age of Syracuse, 393-367 B.C. Anarchy in the West, 367-345 B.C. Conclusion Key Terms Further Reading 18. Greek Culture in the Fourth Century B.C. Material Culture Plato Aristotle Conclusion Key Terms Further Reading 19. The Warlords of Macedon I: Philip II and Alexander the King Macedonia before Philip II Philip's Struggle for Survival, 359-357 B.C. Philip Consolidates His Position, 357-352 B.C. Philip Seeks a Greek Peace, 352-346 B.C. The Struggle for a Greek Peace, 346-338 B.C. Philip's End, 338-336 B.C. Alexander the King The Conquest of Persia, 334-330 B.C. Key Terms Further Reading 20. The Warlords of Macedon II: Alexander the God The Fall of the Great King Darius, 331-330 B.C. After the War, 330-324 B.C. War in India, 327-326 B.C. The Long March Home, 326-324 B.C. The Last Days, 324-323 B.C. Conclusion Key Terms Further Reading 21. The Successors to Alexander, 323-220 B.C The Wars of the Successors, 323-301 B.C The Hellenistic World after Ipsus The Seleucid Empire Ptolemaic Egypt The Antigonids: Macedonia Key Terms Further Reading 22. The Greek Poleis, 323-220 B.C Impoverishment and Depopulation in Mainland Greece Athens in Decline Sparta's Counterrevolution The Western Greeks: Agathocles of Syracuse (361-289/8 B.C) Pyrrhus of Epirus Hellenistic Society: The Weakening of the Egalitarian Ideal Conclusion Key Terms Further Reading 23. Hellenistic Culture, 323-30 B.C. Hellenistic Historians Poetry Material Culture Hellenistic Philosophy Medicine Quantitative Science in the Hellenistic Age Conclusion Key Terms Further Reading 24. The Coming of Rome, 220-30 B.C. The Rise of Rome, 753-280 B.C. Rome, Carthage, and the Western Greeks, 280-200 B.C. Rome Breaks the Hellenistic Empires, 200-167 B.C. Consequences of the Wars: The Greeks Consequences of the Wars: The Romans New Roman Army The Agony of the Aegean, 99-70 B.C. Pompey's Greek Settlement, 70-62 B.C. The End of Hellenistic Egypt, 61-30 B.C. Aftermath Key Terms Further Reading 25. Conclusion The Bronze Age (c. 3000-1200 B.C.-- Chapter 4) The Dark Age (c. 1200-700 B.C.-- Chapter 5) The Archaic Period (c. 700-500 B.C.-- Chapters 6-10) The Classical Period (c. 500-350 B.C.-- Chapters 11-18) The Macedonian Takeover (c. 350-323 B.C.-- Chapters 19-22) The Hellenistic Period (c. 323-30 B.C.-- Chapters 23-24) Conclusion Pronunciation Guide.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781292022383 20160612
For courses in Greek History or Greek Civilization. Organized chronologically, this text presents a complete picture of Greek civilization as a history. It features sections on the art, architecture, literature, and thought of each period. This text presents students with the history of Greece from the prehistoric through the Mycenaean Period, the Dark Ages, the Classical Period, the Hellenistic, and the absorption of Greek culture by Rome.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781292022383 20160612
Green Library
CLASSICS-81-01, HISTORY-117-01
Book
xxiii, 400 p., [12] p. of plates : ill. (some col.), maps ; 26 cm.
  • List of Illustrations. List of Color Photographs. List of Maps. Preface. Chapter 1: Introductory Concerns. 1) What is ancient Egypt? Chronological boundaries. Geographical boundaries. What is Ancient Egyptian History? Who are the Ancient Egyptians? 2) Egypt's Geography. The Nile River. The Desert. Climate. Frontiers and links. 3) The makeup of Egyptian historical sources. Papyri and ostraca. Monumental inscriptions. Historical criticism. 4) The Egyptians and their past. King lists. Egyptian concepts of kingship. 5) The Chronology of Egyptian History. Modern subdivisions of Egyptian history. Absolute chronology. 6) Prehistoric Developments. The Beginning of agriculture. Naqada I and II periods. Box 1: The five names of the kings of Egypt. Box 2: Egyptian city names. Chapter 2: The formation of the Egyptian state (ca. 3400-2686). 1) Sources. 2) Royal cemeteries and cities. The Late Naqada Culture. Dynasty 0. 3) The first kings. Images of War. The Unification of Egypt. 4) Ideological foundations of the new state. Kings. Cemeteries. Festivals. Royal Annals and Year Names. Gods and Cults. Bureaucracy. 5) The invention of writing. Precursors at Abydos. Hieroglyphic script. 6) Foreign Relations. The Uruk Culture of Mesopotamia. Late Fourth Millennium Nubia. Late Fourth Millennium Palestine. Box 1: Languages and scripts of ancient Egypt. Box 2: Canons of Egyptian art. Key Debate: The impetus to state formation in Egypt. Chapter 3: The Great Pyramid Builders (ca. 2686-2345). 1) Sources. 2) The evolution of the mortuary complex. Djoser's Step Pyramid at Saqqara. Sneferu's three pyramids. The Great Pyramids at Giza. Solar Temples of the Fifth Dynasty. 3) Administrating the Old Kingdom State. Neferirkara's Archive at Abusir. Officialdom. 4) Ideological debates? Problems of Royal Succession. The Gods Horus and Ra. 5) Foreign Relations. Contacts with Nubia. Contacts with Asia. 6) Later traditions about the Old Kingdom. Djoser and Imhotep. Sneferu. The Great Pyramid Builders. Box 1: The afterlife of the mortuary complexes. Box 2: Egypt's administration. Documents: 1) A papyrus from Abusir. 2) A Middle Kingdom Tale about the fifth dynasty. Key Debate: How was the Great Pyramid built? Chapter 4: The End of the Old Kingdom and the First Intermediate Period (ca. 2345-2055 BC). 1) Sources. 2) The rise of the regions and political fragmentation. Nomes and nomarchs. Mortuary Texts. Officials' biographies. Pepy II. Why did the Old Kingdom dissolve? 3) Foreign Relations. Nubian independence. Beyond the Nile Valley. Mercenaries. 4) Competition between Herakleopolis and Thebes. Herakleopolis. Thebes. 5) Appraising the First Intermediate Period. Middle Kingdom literary reflections. Historical critique. Box: Pyramid Texts and Coffin Texts. Documents: 1) The Inscription of Pepynakht. 2) The Tale of Pepy II and his general. Key Debate: Climate Change and the First Intermediate Period. Chapter 5: The Middle Kingdom (ca. 2055-1650 BC). 1) Sources and chronology. 2) Kings and regional elites. Reunification and the Eleventh Dynasty. The start of the twelfth Dynasty and the foundation of Itj-tawi. Provincial powers in the early Middle Kingdom. Royal interference in the provinces. Administrative centralization. Royal power in the thirteenth dynasty. 3) Kings as warriors. The annexation of Nubia. 4) Egypt in the wider world. The Early Kingdom of Kush. The Eastern Desert and Sinai. Syria and Palestine. The World Beyond. Rhetoric and Practice in Foreign Relations. 5) The cult of Osiris. 6) Middle Kingdom Literature and its impact on Egyptian culture. Box 1: The Heqanakht papyri. Box 2: Reading Egyptian literature. Document: The Execration Texts. Key debate: Co-regencies. Chapter 6: The Second Intermediate period and the Hyksos (ca. 1700-1550 BC). 1) Sources and chronology. 2) Avaris: the multiple transformations of a Delta city. A history of Avaris. Cultural hybridity. Other immigrants. 3) The Hyksos. The name Hyksos. Hyksos origins. Egyptian cultural influences. Political history. The fourteenth and sixteenth dynasties. Hyksos rule in Palestine? 4) Nubia and the Kingdom of Kush. The independence of Lower Nubia. The Kingdom of Kush. Kerma. The extent of the Kingdom of Kush. 5) Thebes in the Middle. Royal tombs. Seqenenra Taa. Kamose's war. 6) The Hyksos in later perspective. Queen Hatshepsut. The gods Ra and Seth. Manetho and Josephus. Box: Egyptian gods. Document: the Rhind mathematical papyrus. Key debate: Who were the Hyksos? Chapter 7: The Birth of Empire: The early 18th dynasty (ca. 1550-1390). 1) Egypt in a New World Order. 2) Sources and Chronology. 3) Egypt at War. War and Society in the New Kingdom. The "War of Liberation". The Annexation of Nubia. Wars in Western Asia. 4) Egypt and the Outside World. 5) Domestic Issues. Royal Succession. Hatshepsut. Royal Mortuary Customs. New Kingdom Bureaucracy. Building activity in the early 18th dynasty. Box: The Tomb of Rekhmira. Documents: 1) The biography of Ahmose, son of Ibana. 2) The Annals of Thutmose III. Key debate: Hatshepsut's proscription. Chapter 8: The Amarna Revolution and the late 18th Dynasty (ca. 1390-1295). 1) An International Age. The Club of the Great Powers. The administration of Syria and Palestine. The rise of the Hittites. A failed marriage alliance. 2) Amenhotep III: the sun king. Amenhotep III's divinity and his building projects. The king's family. The king's court. 3) From Amenhotep III to Amenhotep IV/Akhenaten. 4) Akhenaten. Theban years (years 1 to 5). Akhetaten (years 5 to 12). Turmoil (years 12 to 17). Akhenaten's successors. Documents: 1) Hymn to Aten. 2) The Restoration Stele of Tutankhamun. Box: The city of Akhetaten. Key debate: The end of the Amarna period. 5) Akhenaten's memory. Chapter 9: The Ramessid Empire (ca. 1295-1203). 1) Domestic policy: restoration and renewal. Sety I. Rameses II. 2) International relations: reforming the empire. Wars in Syria. A new imperial structure. Foreigners in Egypt. 3) Rameses's court. Officials. The royal family. 4) A community of tomb builders. Documents: 1) Rameses defends his account of the battle of Qadesh. 2) Letters from Deir el-Medina. Box: Litigation over real estate. Key debate: Markets in ancient Egypt. Chapter 10: The End of Empire (ca. 1213-1070). 1) Problems at court. Sety II and Amenmessu. Saptah and Tausret. Sethnakht. 2) Breakdown of order. Tomb robberies. Workers' strikes. 3) The decline of royal power. 4) Pressures from abroad. Libyans and Sea Peoples. The end of the international system. 5) End of the New Kingdom. Box: The Tale of Wenamun. Documents: 1) The "Israel Stele" of Merenptah. 2) Disregard for the king. Key Debate: The Sea Peoples. Chapter 11: The Third Intermediate Period (ca. 1069-715). 1) Sources and Chronology. 2) Twin cities: Thebes and Tanis (the 21st dynasty, 1069-945). Thebes. Tanis. The Concordat. 3) Libyan rule (22nd to 24th dynasties, 945-715). Centralization and diffusion of power. The God's Wife of Amun. 4) The end of the Third Intermediate Period. Nubian resurgence. Saite Expansion. Documents: 1) Sheshonq I's accession to power. 2) Piy's Victory stele. Key Debate: Fortresses in Middle Egypt. Chapter 12: Egypt in the Age of Empires (ca. 715-332). 1) Sources and Chronology. 2) The Eastern Mediterranean in the First Millennium. 3) Egypt, Kush, and Assyria (ca. 715-656). Military incidents. 4) Egypt, Greeks, and Babylonians (656-525). Greek-Egyptian relations. Military activity. 5) Recollections of the past under the kings of Kush and Sais. 6) Egypt and Persia (525-332). Domination and resistance. Mixing Cultures. Box: The Apis bull and other animal cults. Document: The Petition of Petiese. Key Debate: King Cambyses and the Apis bull. Chapter 13: Greek and Roman Egypt (332 BC- AD 395). 1) Sources and Chronology. 2) Alexandria and Philae. Alexandria. Philae. 3) Kings, queens, and emperors. The Ptolemies. Queen Cleopatra VII. Roman Egypt. 4) Greeks, Romans, and Egyptians. Administration. Culture and Religion. 5) Economic developments: Agriculture, finance, and trade. 6) The African Hinterland. 7) The Christianization of Egypt. Box 1: Menches, village scribe of Kerkeosiris. Box 2: Manetho's History of Egypt. Document: The Rosetta Stone. Key Debate: Greeks and Egyptians in Ptolemaic Egypt. Epilogue. Guide to further reading. Glossary. King list. Bibliography.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781405160711 20160604
  • List of Illustrations. List of Color Plates. List of Maps. List of Boxed Texts. List of Summaries of Dynastic History. Preface. 1. Introductory Concerns. 1.1 What Is Ancient Egypt?. 1.2 Egypt's Geography. 1.3 The Makeup of Egyptian Historical Sources. 1.4 The Egyptians and their Past. 1.5 The Chronology of Egyptian History. 1.6 Prehistoric Developments. 2. The Formation of the Egyptian State (ca. 3400-2686). 2.1 Sources. 2.2 Royal Cemeteries and Cities. 2.3 The First Kings. 2.4 Ideological Foundations of the New State. 2.5 The Invention of Writing. 2.6 Foreign Relations. 3. The Great Pyramid Builders (ca. 2686-2345). 3.1 Sources. 3.2 The Evolution of the Mortuary Complex. 3.3 Administrating the Old Kingdom State. 3.4 Ideological Debates?. 3.5 Foreign Relations. 3.6 Later Traditions about the Old Kingdom. 4. The End of the Old Kingdom and the First Intermediate Period (ca. 2345-2055). 4.1 Sources. 4.2 The Rise of the Regions and Political Fragmentation. 4.3 Foreign Relations. 4.4 Competition between Herakleopolis and Thebes. 4.5 Appraising the First Intermediate Period. 5. The Middle Kingdom (ca. 2055-1650). 5.1 Sources and Chronology. 5.2 Kings and Regional Elites. 5.3 Kings as Warriors. 5.4 Egypt in the Wider World. 5.5 The Cult of Osiris. 5.6 Middle Kingdom Literature and Its Impact on Egyptian Culture. 6. The Second Intermediate Period and the Hyksos (ca. 1700-1550). 6.1 Sources and Chronology. 6.2 Avaris: The Multiple Transformations of a Delta City. 6.3 The Hyksos. 6.4 Nubia and the Kingdom of Kush. 6.5 Thebes in the Middle. 6.6 The Hyksos in Later Perspective. 7. The Birth of Empire: The Early 18th Dynasty (ca. 1550-1390). 7.1 Egypt in a New World Order. 7.2 Sources and Chronology. 7.3 Egypt at War. 7.4 Egypt and the Outside World. 7.5 Domestic Issues. 8. The Amarna Revolution and the Late 18th Dynasty (ca. 1390-1295). 8.1 An International Age. 8.2 Amenhotep III: The Sun King. 8.3 From Amenhotep III to Amenhotep IV/Akhenaten. 8.4 Akhenaten. 8.5 Akhenaten's Memory. 9. The Ramessid Empire (ca. 1295-1203). 9.1 Domestic Policy: Restoration and Renewal. 9.2 International Relations: Reforming the Empire. 9.3 Rameses's Court. 9.4 A Community of Tomb Builders. 10. The End of Empire (ca. 1213-1070). 10.1 Problems at Court. 10.2 Breakdown of Order. 10.3 The Decline of Royal Power. 10.4 Pressures from Abroad. 10.5 End of the New Kingdom. 11. The Third Intermediate Period (ca. 1069-715). 11.1 Sources and Chronology. 11.2 Twin Cities: Thebes and Tanis (the 21st Dynasty, 1069-945). 11.3 Libyan Rule (22nd to 24th Dynasties, 945-715). 11.4 The End of the Third Intermediate Period. 12. Egypt in the Age of Empires (ca. 715-332). 12.1 Sources and Chronology. 12.2 The Eastern Mediterranean in the First Millennium. 12.3 Egypt, Kush, and Assyria (ca. 715-656). 12.4 Egypt, Greeks, and Babylonians (656-525). 12.5 Recollections of the Past under the Kings of Kush and Sais. 12.6 Egypt and Persia (525-332). 13. Greek and Roman Egypt (332 bc-ad 395). 13.1 Sources and Chronology. 13.2 Alexandria and Philae. 13.3 Kings, Queens, and Emperors. 13.4 Greeks, Romans, and Egyptians. 13.5 Economic Developments: Agriculture, Finance, and Trade. 13.6 The African Hinterland. 13.7 The Christianization of Egypt. Epilogue. Guide to Further Reading. Glossary. King List. Bibliography. Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781405160704 20160604
Outlining the major political and cultural events, A History of Ancient Egypt is an authoritative and accessible introduction to this fascinating ancient culture. An accessible chronological narrative that draws on a range of historical sources Offers an up-to-date survey of ancient Egypt's history from its origins to its domination by the Roman Empire Considers social and economic life and the rich culture of ancient Egypt Places Egypt's history within its regional context, detailing interactions with Asia and Africa Engages students with various perspectives on a range of critical issues with the Key Debate section included in each chapter Makes the latest discoveries and scholarship accessible to a wide audience.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781405160711 20160604
Green Library
CLASSICS-81-01, HISTORY-117-01
Book
xiv, 511 p. : ill., maps ; 27 cm.
  • List of Illustrations vii Preface xi Chapter 1: Imperial Trajectories 1 Chapter 2: Imperial Rule in Rome and China 23 Chapter 3: After Rome: Empire, Christianity, and Islam 61 Chapter 4: Eurasian Connections: The Mongol Empires 93 Chapter 5: Beyond the Mediterranean: Ottoman and Spanish Empires 117 Chapter 6: Oceanic Economies and Colonial Societies: Europe, Asia, and the Americas 149 Chapter 7: Beyond the Steppe: Empire-Building in Russia and China 185 Chapter 8: Empire, Nation, and Citizenship in a Revolutionary Age 219 Chapter 9: Empires across Continents: The United States and Russia 251 Chapter 10: Imperial Repertoires and Myths of Modern Colonialism 287 Chapter 11: Sovereignty and Empire: Nineteenth-Century Europe and Its Near Abroad 331 Chapter 12: War and Revolution in a World of Empires: 1914 to 1945 369 Chapter 13: End of Empire? 413 Chapter 14: Empires, States, and Political Imagination 443 Suggested Reading and Citations 461 Index 481.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691127088 20160604
Empires - vast states of territories and peoples united by force and ambition - have dominated the political landscape for more than two millennia. "Empires in World History" departs from conventional European and nation-centered perspectives to take a remarkable look at how empires relied on diversity to shape the global order. Beginning with ancient Rome and China and continuing across Asia, Europe, the Americas, and Africa, Jane Burbank and Frederick Cooper examine empires' conquests, rivalries, and strategies of domination - with an emphasis on how empires accommodated, created, and manipulated differences among populations. Burbank and Cooper examine Rome and China from the third century BCE, empires that sustained state power for centuries. They delve into the militant monotheism of Byzantium, the Islamic Caliphates, and the short-lived Carolingians, as well as the pragmatically tolerant rule of the Mongols and Ottomans, who combined religious protection with the politics of loyalty. Burbank and Cooper discuss the influence of empire on capitalism and popular sovereignty, the limitations and instability of Europe's colonial projects, Russia's repertoire of exploitation and differentiation, as well as the 'empire of liberty' - devised by American revolutionaries and later extended across a continent and beyond. With its investigation into the relationship between diversity and imperial states, "Empires in World History" offers a fresh approach to understanding the impact of empires on the past and present.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691127088 20160604
Green Library
CLASSICS-81-01, HISTORY-117-01
Book
xviii, 469 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
Green Library
CLASSICS-81-01, HISTORY-117-01
Book
xx, 427 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
  • Preface Acknowledgements 1. Palestine in the Late Bronze Age (14th - 13th Centuries) Part One: A Normal History 2. The Transition (12th Century) 3. The New Society (c. 1150-1050) 4. The Formative Process (c. 1050-930) 5. The Kingdom of Israel (c. 930 -740) 6. The Kingdom of Judah (c. 930-720) 7. The Impact of the Assyrian Empire (c. 740-640) 8. Pause between Two Empires (c. 640-610) 9. The Impact of the Babylonian Empire (c.610-585) Intermezzo 10. The Axial Age 11. The Diaspora 12. The Abandoned Landscape Part Two: An Invented History 13. Returnees and 'Remainees': The Invention of the Patriarchs 14. Returnees and Aliens: The Invention of the Conquest 15. A Nation without a King: The Invention of the Judges 16. The Royal Option: The Invention of the United Monarchy 17. The Priestly Option: The Invention of the Solomonic Temple 18. Self-Identification: The Invention of the Law Epilogue 19. Local History and Universal Values Bibliography.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781904768760 20160528
One of Italy's foremost experts on antiquity addresses a new issue surrounding the birth of Israel and its historic reality. Many a tale has been told of ancient Israel, but all tales are alike in their quotation of the biblical story in its narrative scheme, despite its historic unreliability. This book completely rewrites the history of Israel through the evaluation of textual and literary critiques as well as archaeological and epigraphic findings. Conceived along the lines of modern historical methodology, it traces the textual material to the times of its creation, reconstructs the temporal evolution of political and religious ideologies, and firmly inserts the history of Israel into its ancient-oriental context.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781904768760 20160528
Green Library
CLASSICS-81-01, HISTORY-117-01
Book
x, 385 p. : ill., maps ; 21 cm.
  • The bible as history?
  • The rise and fall of ancient Israel
  • Judah and the making of biblical history.
Green Library
CLASSICS-81-01, HISTORY-117-01
Book
xx, 1196 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
Green Library
CLASSICS-81-01, HISTORY-117-01
Book
xiii, 313 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
Green Library
CLASSICS-81-01, HISTORY-117-01
Book
2 v. (xxviii, 782 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
  • v. 1. ,pt. 1. The development of states and cities (c.3000-c1600; pt. 2. The great powers (c.1600-c.1050
  • v.2, pt.3. Political transformation and the great empires (c.1200-330).
The region in discussion embraces a vast geographical area, from the borders of Iran and Afghanistan in the east to the Levant and Anatolia, and from the Black Sea in the north to Egypt in the south. It was a region of enormous cultural, political and linguistic diversity. In this study, Amelie Kurht examines its history from the earliest written documents to the conquest of Alexander the Great, c.3000-330 BC. This work provides a narrative which takes into account the latest archaeological and textual discoveries and deals with the complex problems of interpretation and methodology. This text may be useful for students of history of this region and should be a valuable introduction for students and scholars working in related subjects.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415013529 20160527
Green Library
CLASSICS-81-01, HISTORY-117-01