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Book
xx, 237 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm.
  • List of Illustrations xi Series Editor's Foreword xiii Preface xv Acknowledgments xix PROLOGUE The Collapse of Civilizations: 1177 BC 1 CHAPTER ONE Act I. Of Arms and the Man: The Fifteenth Century BC 14 CHAPTER TWO Act II. An (Aegean) Affair to Remember: The Fourteenth Century BC 43 CHAPTER THREE Act III. Fighting for Gods and Country: The Thirteenth Century BC 73 CHAPTER FOUR Act IV. The End of an Era: The Twelfth Century BC 102 CHAPTER FIVE A "Perfect Storm" of Calamities? 139 EPILOGUE The Aftermath 171 Dramatis Personae 177 Notes 181 Bibliography 201 Index 229.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691140896 20160613
In 1177 B.C., marauding groups known only as the "Sea Peoples" invaded Egypt. The pharaoh's army and navy managed to defeat them, but the victory so weakened Egypt that it soon slid into decline, as did most of the surrounding civilizations. After centuries of brilliance, the civilized world of the Bronze Age came to an abrupt and cataclysmic end. Kingdoms fell like dominoes over the course of just a few decades. No more Minoans or Mycenaeans. No more Trojans, Hittites, or Babylonians. The thriving economy and cultures of the late second millennium B.C., which had stretched from Greece to Egypt and Mesopotamia, suddenly ceased to exist, along with writing systems, technology, and monumental architecture. But the Sea Peoples alone could not have caused such widespread breakdown. How did it happen? In this major new account of the causes of this "First Dark Ages, " Eric Cline tells the gripping story of how the end was brought about by multiple interconnected failures, ranging from invasion and revolt to earthquakes, drought, and the cutting of international trade routes. Bringing to life the vibrant multicultural world of these great civilizations, he draws a sweeping panorama of the empires and globalized peoples of the Late Bronze Age and shows that it was their very interdependence that hastened their dramatic collapse and ushered in a dark age that lasted centuries. A compelling combination of narrative and the latest scholarship, 1177 B.C. sheds new light on the complex ties that gave rise to, and ultimately destroyed, the flourishing civilizations of the Late Bronze Age-and that set the stage for the emergence of classical Greece.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691140896 20160613
Green Library
CLASSICS-389-01
Book
xxii, 457 p. : maps ; 25 cm.
The enormous hoard of beautiful gold military objects found in 2009 in a field in Staffordshire has focused huge attention on the mysterious world of 7th and 8th century Britain. Clearly the product of a sophisticated, wealthy, highly militarized society, the objects beg innumerable questions about how we are to understand the people who once walked across the same landscape we inhabit, who are our ancestors and yet left such a slight record of their presence. "Britain after Rome" brings together a wealth of research and imaginative engagement to bring us as close as we can hope to get to the tumultuous centuries between the departure of the Roman legions and the arrival of Norman invaders nearly seven centuries later. As towns fell into total decay, Christianity disappeared and wave upon wave of invaders swept across the island, it can be too easily assumed that life in Britain became intolerable - and yet this is the world in which modern languages and political arrangements were forged, a number of fascinating cultures rose and fell and tantalizing glimpses, principally through the study of buildings and burials, can be had of a surprising and resilient place. The result of a lifetime of work, Robin Fleming's major new addition to the "Penguin History of Britain" could not be more opportune. A richly enjoyable, varied and surprising book, "Britain after Rome" allows its readers to see Britain's history in a quite new light.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780713990645 20160604
Green Library
CLASSICS-389-01
Book
x, 254 p. : ill., maps ; 29 cm.
Green Library
CLASSICS-389-01
Book
xvi, 298 p. : ill., plans ; 24 cm.
  • Contents List of Illustrations Preface and Acknowledgements List of Abbreviations Glossary Note on Usage and Nomenclature Introduction 1 Terminology and chronology 2 The collapse of the Bronze Age civilisation 3 The Postpalatial period 4 The structure and economy of communities 5 Crafts 6 Burial customs 7 Trade, exchange, and foreign contacts 8 Religion 9 Conclusions Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Following Oliver Dickinson's successful "The Aegean Bronze Age, " this textbook is an up-to-date synthesis of the period between the collapse of the Bronze Age civilization in the thirteenth and twelfth centuries BC, and the rise of the Greek civilization in the eight century BC. With chapter bibliographies, distribution maps and illustrations, Dickinson's detailed examination of material and archaeological evidence argues that many characteristics of Ancient Greece developed in the Dark Ages. He also includes up-to-date coverage of the "Homeric question". This highly informative text focuses on: the reasons for the Bronze Age collapse which brought about the Dark Ages; the processes that enabled Greece to emerge from the Dark Ages; and the degree of continuity from the Dark Ages to later times. Dickinson has provided an invaluable survey of this period that will not only be useful to specialists and undergraduates in the field, but that will also prove highly popular with the interested general reader.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library, Classics Library
CLASSICS-389-01
Book
xiii, 333 p. : maps ; 24 cm.
  • Maps Introduction 1. Politics and Society in Britain c.600-800 2. The Conversion of Britain to Christianity 3. The Organisation and Culture of the Church in Early Medieval Britain 4. Society, Politics and Religion in Early Medieval Britain Conclusion Appendix 1: Timeline of main events and people Appendix 2: Pictish kings from king lists P and Q Appendix 3: The Kings of Northumbria from Athelfrith to Eardwulf Appendix 4: The kings of Mercia from Penda to Coenwulf Appendix 5: The union of the Bernician and Deiran royal houses through marriage Appendix 6: Two rival theories for the descent of the Pictish kings Constantine and Onuist, the sons of Uurguist/Fergus.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780582772922 20160528
The Britain of 600-800 AD was populated by four distinct peoples; the British, Picts, Irish and Anglo-Saxons. They spoke 3 different languages, Gaelic, Brittonic and Old English, and lived in a diverse cultural environment. In 600 the British and the Irish were already Christians. In contrast the conversion of the Anglo-Saxons and Picts occurred somewhat later, at the end of the 6th and during the 7th century. Religion was one of the ways through which cultural difference was expressed, and the rulers of different areas of Britain dictated the nature of the dominant religion in areas under their control. This book uses the Conversion and the Christianisation of the different peoples of Britainas a framework through which to explore the workings of their political systems and the structures of their society. Because Christianity adapted to and affected the existing religious beliefs and social norms wherever it was introduced, it's the perfect medium through which to study various aspects of society that are difficult to study by any other means.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780582772922 20160528
Green Library
CLASSICS-389-01
Book
xvi, 621 p. : maps ; 25 cm.
The centuries under which Britain was under Roman occupation have always had a contradictory reputation. Generations of British readers were brought up to approve of the Roman Empire as the model for their own empire, but equally it was embarrassingly clear that within the Roman Empire Britain itself was merely an unattractive exploitation colony. David Mattingly's major new book draws on a wealth of new research to recreate brilliantly this colonial Britain: a rebellious, disadvantaged place needing heavy garrisoning and highly vulnerable to political change in Rome. The result puts the whole great story in a new and fascinating light.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
CLASSICS-389-01
Book
xl, 536 p. : ill. (some col.), maps ; 31 cm.
Sutton Hoo is one of the most famous archaeological sites in the world. In 1939 it was the scene of the discovery of a fabulous treasure buried in a ship 30 metres long. In 1983 a new project began with the aim of discovering the context of the great Sutton Hoo burial ship. Using revolutionary fieldwork procedures, this new campaign uncovered a hectare of the cemetery, surveyed the surrounding region and made direct comparisons with monumental practices in neighbouring kingdoms across the North Sea. It was found that the burials were highly diverse - cremations in bronze bowls, with a horse, in a bed, and in boats and ships - and that many had been ransacked. Among the new finds were a new ship-burial and the first complete horse-burial, with its harness, to be excavated in England. From the eighth to tenth century, this 'burial ground of kings' became an execution site, allowing the new Christian authorities to exercise power through the public disposal of dissidents. Two groups of unfurnished burials were discovered, one associated with the posts of a gallows or gibbet. "Sutton Hoo: A Seventh-Century Princely Burial Ground and its Context" offers a description of all the investigations undertaken since 1983. The early medieval artefacts, the early medieval landscape and the environmental and prehistoric sequences are studied by contributing experts. The book provides a complete scholarly companion to the archaeological research and interpretation of Sutton Hoo.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780714123226 20160528
Green Library
CLASSICS-389-01
Book
204 p. : ill., maps ; 27 cm.
Green Library
CLASSICS-389-01

9. The Anglo-Saxons [1991]

Book
272 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 28 cm.
This survey, an introduction to the history of Anglo-Saxon England looks at political history, and religious, cultural, social, legal and economic themes are woven in. Throughout the book the authors make use of original sources such as chronicles, charters, manuscripts and coins, works of art, archaelogical remains and surviving buildings.The nature of power and kingship, role of wealth, rewards, conquest and blood-feud in the perennial struggle for power, structure of society, the development of Christianity and the relations between church and secular authority are discussed at length, while particular topics are explored in 19 "picture essays".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780140143959 20160528
Green Library
CLASSICS-389-01
Book
v. : ill. ; 26 cm.
  • pt. 1. The pottery / by R.W.V. Catling and I.S. Lemos
  • pt. 2. The Excavation, architecture and finds / with j. Coulton and H.W. Catling.
Green Library
CLASSICS-389-01
Book
224 p. illus. (some col.), maps, plans. 26 cm.
Green Library
CLASSICS-389-01