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1. Crux [2013]

Book
557 pages ; 20 cm.
Six months have passed since the release of Nexus 5. The world is a different, more dangerous place. In the United States, the terrorists - or freedom fighters - of the Post-Human Liberation Front use Nexus to turn men and women into human time bombs aimed at the President and his allies. In Washington DC, a government scientist, secretly addicted to Nexus, uncovers more than he wants to know about the forces behind the assassinations, and finds himself in a maze with no way out. The first blows in the war between human and post-human have been struck. The world will never be the same.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780857662958 20161228
Green Library
CLASSICS-38-01, CLASSICS-38-01, HUMCORE-1-01, HUMCORE-1-01
Book
xxiv, 480 pages : illustrations (some color), color maps ; 26 cm
  • Preface and Acknowledgements -- List of Illustrations -- Introduction -- 1. The Discovery of Ice Age Art -- 2. The Oldest 'Art' in the World -- 3. A Worldwide Phenomenon -- 4. Making a Record -- 5. How Old is the Art? -- 6. Fakes and Forgeries -- 7. Portable Art -- 8. Blocks, Rock-Shelters, and Caves -- 9. Art in the Open Air -- 10. What Was Depicted? -- 11. Reading the Messages -- 12. Conclusion -- Notes -- References -- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199686001 20160919
Images of the Ice Age, here in its third edition, is the most complete study available of the world's earliest imagery, presenting a fascinating and up-to-date account of the art of our Ice Age ancestors. Authoritative and wide-ranging, it covers not only the magnificent cave art of famous sites such as Lascaux, Altamira, and Chauvet, but also other less well-known sites around the world, art discovered in the open air, and the thousands of incredible pieces of portable art in bone, antler, ivory, and stone produced in the same period. In doing so, the book summarizes all the major worldwide research into Ice Age art both past and present, exploring the controversial history of the art's discovery and acceptance, including the methods used for recording and dating, the faking of decorated objects and caves, and the wide range of theories that have been applied to this artistic corpus. Lavishly illustrated and highly accessible, Images of the Ice Age provides a visual feast and an absorbing synthesis of this crucial aspect of human history, offering a unique opportunity to appreciate universally important works of art, many of which can never be accessible to the public, and which represent the very earliest evidence of artistic expression.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199686001 20160919
Green Library
CLASSICS-38-01, CLASSICS-38-01, HUMCORE-1-01, HUMCORE-1-01
Book
xxii, 369 pages : illustrations, maps ; 23 cm.
  • List of Figures and Tables ix Acknowledgments xi Introduction by Stephen Macedo xiii Chapter 1 Each Age Gets the Thought It Needs 1 Chapter 2 Foragers 25 Chapter 3 Farmers 44 Chapter 4 Fossil Fuels 93 Chapter 5 The Evolution of Values: Biology, Culture, and the Shape of Things to Come 139 Comments Chapter 6 On the Ideology of Imagining That "Each Age Gets the Thought It Needs, " Richard Seaford 172 Chapter 7 But What Was It Really Like? The Limitations of Measuring Historical Values, Jonathan D. Spence 180 Chapter 8 Eternal Values, Evolving Values, and the Value of the Self, Christine M. Korsgaard 184 Chapter 9 When the Lights Go Out: Human Values after the Collapse of Civilization, Margaret Atwood 202 Response Chapter 10 My Correct Views on Everything, Ian Morris 208 Notes 267 References 305 Contributors 341 Index 343.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691160399 20171211
Most people in the world today think democracy and gender equality are good, and that violence and wealth inequality are bad. But most people who lived during the 10,000 years before the nineteenth century thought just the opposite. Drawing on archaeology, anthropology, biology, and history, Ian Morris explains why. Fundamental long-term changes in values, Morris argues, are driven by the most basic force of all: energy. Humans have found three main ways to get the energy they need--from foraging, farming, and fossil fuels. Each energy source sets strict limits on what kinds of societies can succeed, and each kind of society rewards specific values. But if our fossil-fuel world favors democratic, open societies, the ongoing revolution in energy capture means that our most cherished values are very likely to turn out not to be useful any more. Foragers, Farmers, and Fossil Fuels offers a compelling new argument about the evolution of human values, one that has far-reaching implications for how we understand the past--and for what might happen next. Originating as the Tanner Lectures delivered at Princeton University, the book includes challenging responses by classicist Richard Seaford, historian of China Jonathan Spence, philosopher Christine Korsgaard, and novelist Margaret Atwood.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691160399 20171211
Green Library
CLASSICS-38-01, CLASSICS-38-01, HUMCORE-1-01, HUMCORE-1-01
Book
xiii, 248 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • List of Illustrations ix Acknowledgments xi The Eight Principles of Big Gods xiii Chapter 1 Religious Evolution 1 Chapter 2 S upernatural Watchers 13 Chapter 3 Pressure from Above 33 Chapter 4 I n Big Gods We Trust 55 Chapter 5 Freethinkers as Freeriders 76 Chapter 6 True Believers 94 Chapter 7 Big Gods for Big Groups 118 Chapter 8 The Gods of Cooperation and Competition 140 Chapter 9 From Religious Cooperation to Religious Conflict 155 Chapter 10 Cooperation without God 170 Notes 193 References 215 Index 243.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691151212 20160612
How did human societies scale up from small, tight-knit groups of hunter-gatherers to the large, anonymous, cooperative societies of today - even though anonymity is the enemy of cooperation? How did organized religions with "Big Gods" - the great monotheistic and polytheistic faiths - spread to colonize most minds in the world? In Big Gods, Ara Norenzayan makes the surprising and provocative argument that these fundamental puzzles about the origins of civilization are one and the same, and answer each other. Once human minds could conceive of supernatural beings, Norenzayan argues, the stage was set for rapid cultural and historical changes that eventually led to large societies with Big Gods - powerful, omniscient, interventionist deities concerned with regulating the moral behavior of humans. How? As the saying goes, "watched people are nice people." It follows that people play nice when they think Big Gods are watching them, even when no one else is. Yet at the same time that sincere faith in Big Gods unleashed unprecedented cooperation within ever-expanding groups, it also introduced a new source of potential conflict between competing groups. In some parts of the world, such as northern Europe, secular institutions have precipitated religion's decline by usurping its community-building functions. These societies with atheist majorities - some of the most cooperative, peaceful, and prosperous in the world - climbed religion's ladder, and then kicked it away. So while Big Gods answers fundamental questions about the origins and spread of world religions, it also helps us understand another, more recent social transition - the rise of cooperative societies without belief in gods.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691151212 20160612
Green Library
CLASSICS-38-01, CLASSICS-38-01, HUMCORE-1-01, HUMCORE-1-01
Book
xx, 501 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • What is Enlightenment?
  • All coherence gone
  • Bringing pity back in
  • The fatherless world
  • The science of man
  • Discovering man in nature
  • The defense of civilization
  • The great society of mankind
  • The vast commonwealth of nature
  • Enlightenment and its enemies.
An assessment of the Enlightenment period as an influential intellectual movement reveals how it laid the foundation of today's government, philosophy, science and society, noting the pivotal contributions of scholars ranging from Hume and Diderot to Voltaire and Rousseau.
Green Library
CLASSICS-38-01, CLASSICS-38-01, HUMCORE-1-01, HUMCORE-1-01
Book
xvii, 419 p. : ill ; 25 cm.
  • Where does morality come from?
  • The intuitive dog and its rational tail
  • Elephants rule
  • Vote for me (here's why)
  • Beyond WEIRD morality
  • Taste buds of the righteous mind
  • The moral foundations of politics
  • The conservative advantage
  • Why are we so groupish?
  • The hive switch
  • Religion is a team sport
  • Can't we all disagree more constructively?
A groundbreaking investigation into the origins of morality, which turns out to be the basis for religion and politics. The book explains the American culture wars and refutes the "New Atheists."
Green Library, Marine Biology Library (Miller)
CLASSICS-38-01, CLASSICS-38-01, HUMCORE-1-01, HUMCORE-1-01
Book
xviii, 558 p. : ill., maps (some col.) ; 23 cm.
  • Contents Maps Preface Pronunciation Guide About the Authors Credits 1. A Small, Far-Off Land Historical Sketch Why Study the Greeks? Who Were the Greeks? The Structure of This Book: History, Culture, and Society Key Terms Further Reading 2. Country and People Greek Geography, Climate, and Agriculture Demography Migration Health and Disease Nutrition Economic Growth in Ancient Greece Key Terms Further Reading 3. The Greeks at Home Gender Relationships: Ideals and Realities Sexuality Adults and Children Key Terms Further Reading 4. The Greeks Before History, 12,000-1200 B.C. The End of the Last Ice Age, 12,000-11,000 B.C. The Origins of Agriculture, 11,000-5000 B.C. Greeks and Indo-Europeans Neolithic Society and Economy, 5000-3000 B.C. The Early Bronze Age, 3000-2300 B.C. The Middle Bronze Age, 2300-800 B.C. The Age of Minoan Palaces, 2000-600 B.C. The Rise of Mycenaean Greece, 1750-500 B.C. The End of Minoan Civilization, 1600-1400 B.C. Mycenaean Greece: Archaeology, Linear B, and Homer The End of the Bronze Age, circa 200 B.C. Key Terms Further Reading 5. The Dark Age, 1200-800 B.C. The Collapse of the Old States Life Among the Ruins Dark Age Heroes Art and Trade in the Dark Age The Eighth-Century Renaissance: Economy The Eighth-Century Renaissance: Society The Eighth-Century Renaissance: Culture Conclusion Key Terms Further Reading 6. Homer The Homeric Question Milman Parry and Oral Poetry The Oral Poet in Homer Heinrich Schliemann and the Trojan War The Tragic Iliad Homer and the Invention of Plot The Comic Odyssey Odysseus and Homer Key Terms Further Reading 7. Religion and Myth Definitions of Religion and Myth Hesiod's Myth of the Origin of the Gods Greek Religion in History Forms of Greek Religious Practice Hesiod's Myth of Sacrifice Gods and Other Mysterious Beings Chthonic Religion The Ungrateful Dead and the Laying of the Ghost Ecstatic and Mystical Religion Conclusion Key Terms Further Reading 8. Ancient Greece, 800-480 B.C.: Economy, Society, Politics Government by Oligarchy Elite Culture The Tyrants The Structure of Archaic States Conclusion Key Terms Further Reading 9. The Archaic Cultural Revolution, 700-480 B.C. Natural Philosophy in Miletus Pythagoras: Philosophy and Social Science in the West Hecataeus, Herodotus, and Historie Lyric poets Material Culture Art and Thought in Sixth-Century Greece Key Terms Further Reading 10. A Tale of Two Archaic Cities: Sparta and Athens, 700-480 B.C. Sparta Spartiates, Perioikoi, and Helots Plutarch's Sparta Spartan Government Athens The Seventh-Century Crisis Solon Pisistratus and the Consequences of Solon's Reforms Demokratia Athens Submits to Persia Key Terms Further Reading 11. Persia and the Greeks, 550-490 B.C. Empires of the Ancient Near East Lydia Cyrus and the Rise of Persia, 559--530 B.C. Cambyses and Darius, 530--52 B.C. Persia's Northwest Frontier and the Ionian Revolt, 52--494 B.C. The Battle of Marathon, 490 B.C. Key Terms Further Reading 12. The Great War, 480-479 B.C. Storm Clouds in the West Storm Clouds in the East The Storm Breaks in the West: The Battle of Himera, 480 B.C. The Storm Breaks in the East: The Battle of Thermopylae, 480 B.C. The Fall of Athens The Battle of Salamis The End of the Storm: Battles of Plataea and Mycale, 479 B.C. Conclusion Key Terms Further Reading 13. Democracy and Empire-- Athens and Syracuse, 479-431 B.C. The Expansion of the Syracusan State, 479--461 B.C. The Western Democracies, 461--433 B.C. Economic Growth in Western Greece, 479--433 B.C. Cimon and the Creation of the Athenian Empire, 478--461 B.C. The First Peloponnesian War, 460--446 B.C. Pericles and the Consolidation of Athenian Power, 446--433 B.C. Economic Growth in the Aegean The Edge of the Abyss, 433--431 B.C. Key Terms Further Reading 14. Art and Thought in the Fifth Century B.C. Philosophy Material Culture Key Terms Further Reading 15. Fifth-Century Drama Tragedy The City of Dionysia The Theater of Dionysus Narrative Structure Character and Other Dimensions of Tragedy Tragic Plots Conclusion The Origins of Comedy The Plots of Old Comedy The Structures of Old Comedy Conclusion Key Terms Further Reading 16. The Peloponnesian War and Its Aftermath, 431-399 B.C. The Archidamian War, 431--421 B.C. The Peace of Nicias and the Sicilian Expedition, 421--413 B.C. Sicily and the Carthaginian War, 412--404 B.C. The Ionian War, 412--404 B.C. Aftermath, 404--399 B.C. Conclusion Key Terms Further Reading 17. The Greeks between Persia and Carthage, 399-360 B.C. Sparta's Empire, 404--360 B.C. Economy, Society, and War Sparta's Collapse, 371 B.C. Anarchy in the Aegean, 371--360 B.C. Carthage and Syracuse, 404--360 B.C. The Golden Age of Syracuse, 393--367 B.C. Anarchy in the West, 367--345 B.C. Conclusion Key Terms Further Reading 18. Greek Culture in the Fourth Century B.C. Material Culture Plato Aristotle Conclusion Key Terms Further Reading 19. The Warlords of Macedon I: Philip II and Alexander the King Macedonia before Philip II Philip's Struggle for Survival, 359--357 B.C. Philip Consolidates His Position, 357--352 B.C. Philip Seeks a Greek Peace, 352--346 B.C. The Struggle for a Greek Peace, 346--338 B.C. Philip's End, 338--336 B.C. Alexander the King The Conquest of Persia, 334--330 B.C. Key Terms Further Reading 20. The Warlords of Macedon II: Alexander the God The Fall of the Great King Darius, 331-330 B.C. After the War, 330--324 B.C. War in India, 327--326 B.C. The Long March Home, 326--324 B.C. The Last Days, 324--323 B.C. Conclusion Key Terms Further Reading 21. The Successors to Alexander, 323--220 B.C The Wars of the Successors, 323--301 B.C The Hellenistic World after Ipsus The Seleucid Empire Ptolemaic Egypt The Antigonids: Macedonia Key Terms Further Reading 22. The Greek Poleis, 323--220 B.C Impoverishment and Depopulation in Mainland Greece Athens in Decline Sparta's Counterrevolution The Western Greeks: Agathocles of Syracuse (361--289/8 B.C) Pyrrhus of Epirus Hellenistic Society: The Weakening of the Egalitarian Ideal Conclusion Key Terms Further Reading 23. Hellenistic Culture, 323--30 B.C. Hellenistic Historians Poetry Material Culture Hellenistic Philosophy Medicine Quantitative Science in the Hellenistic Age Conclusion Key Terms Further Reading 24. The Coming of Rome, 220--30 B.C. The Rise of Rome, 753--280 B.C. Rome, Carthage, and the Western Greeks, 280--200 B.C. Rome Breaks the Hellenistic Empires, 200--167 B.C. Consequences of the Wars: The Greeks Consequences of the Wars: The Romans New Roman Army The Agony of the Aegean, 99--70 B.C. Pompey's Greek Settlement, 70--62 B.C. The End of Hellenistic Egypt, 61--30 B.C. Aftermath Key Terms Further Reading 25. Conclusion The Bronze Age (c. 3000-1200 B.C.-- Chapter 4) The Dark Age (c. 1200-700 B.C.-- Chapter 5) The Archaic Period (c. 700-500 B.C.-- Chapters 6-10) The Classical Period (c. 500-350 B.C.-- Chapters 11-18) The Macedonian Takeover (c. 350-323 B.C.-- Chapters 19-22) The Hellenistic Period (c. 323-30 B.C.-- Chapters 23-24) Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780205697342 20160528
Organized chronologically, this text presents a complete picture of Greek civilization as a history and features sections on the art, architecture, literature, and thought of each period.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780205697342 20160528
Green Library, Classics Library
CLASSICS-38-01, CLASSICS-38-01, HUMCORE-1-01, HUMCORE-1-01
Book
xi, 331 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • 1. The Industrial Revolution and the pre-industrial economy-- Part I: 2. The high wage economy of pre-industrial Britain-- 3. The agricultural revolution-- 4. The cheap energy economy-- 5. Why England succeeded-- Part II: 6. Why was the Industrial Revolution British?-- 7. The steam engine-- 8. Cotton-- 9. Coke smelting-- 10. Inventors, enlightenment, and human capital-- 11. From industrial revolution to modern economic growth.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521687850 20160528
Why did the industrial revolution take place in eighteenth-century Britain and not elsewhere in Europe or Asia? In this convincing new account Robert Allen argues that the British industrial revolution was a successful response to the global economy of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. He shows that in Britain wages were high and capital and energy cheap in comparison to other countries in Europe and Asia. As a result, the breakthrough technologies of the industrial revolution - the steam engine, the cotton mill, and the substitution of coal for wood in metal production - were uniquely profitable to invent and use in Britain. The high wage economy of pre-industrial Britain also fostered industrial development since more people could afford schooling and apprenticeships. It was only when British engineers made these new technologies more cost-effective during the nineteenth century that the industrial revolution would spread around the world.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521687850 20160528
Green Library
CLASSICS-38-01, CLASSICS-38-01, HUMCORE-1-01, HUMCORE-1-01
Book
376 p. ; 21 cm.
With the same stunning blend of prophecy and social satire she brought to her classic The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood gives us a keenly prescient novel about the future of humanity-and its present. Humanity here equals Snowman, and in Snowman's recollections Atwood re-creates a time much like our own, when a boy named Jimmy loved an elusive, damaged girl called Oryx and a sardonic genius called Crake. But now Snowman is alone, and as we learn why we also learn about a world that could become ours one day.
Green Library
CLASSICS-38-01, CLASSICS-38-01, HUMCORE-1-01, HUMCORE-1-01

10. After the ice [2003]

Book
xiii, 622 p., [24] p. of plates : ill. (some col.), maps ; 24 cm.
Twenty thousand years ago Earth was in the midst of an ice age. Then global warming arrived, leading to massive floods, the spread of forests and the retreat of the deserts. By 5,000 BC a radically different human world had appeared. In place of hunters and gatherers there were farmers; in place of transient campsites there were towns. The foundations of our modern world had been laid and nothing that came after - the industrial revolution, the atomic age, the internet - have ever matched the significance of those events. After the Ice tells the story of climate change's impact during this momentous period - one that also saw the colonisation of the Americas and mass extictions of animals throughout the world. Drawing on the latest cutting-edge research in archaeology, cognitive science, paleontology, geology and the evolutionary sciences, Steven Mithen creates an evocative, original and remarkably complete picture of minds, cultures, lives and landscapes through 15,000 years of history.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780297643180 20160528
Green Library
CLASSICS-38-01, CLASSICS-38-01, HUMCORE-1-01, HUMCORE-1-01
Book
xx, 511 p. : ill., maps ; 29 cm.
  • Foreword Beatrice Medicine-- Introduction: foragers and others Richard B. Lee and Richard Daly-- Part I. Ethnographies: I.I North America-- Introduction Harvey A. Feit-- Archaeology Aubrey Cannon-- Blackfoot/Plains Alice B. Kehoe-- James Bay Cree Harvey A. Feit-- Slavey Dene Michael Asch and Shirleen Smith-- Innu Jose Mailhot-- Caribou Inuit Ernest S. Burch Jr and Yvon Csonka-- Inupiat Rosita Worl-- Timbisha Shoshone Catherine S. Fowler-- Witsuwite'en and Gitxsan Richard Daly-- I.II South America-- Introduction Laura M. Rival-- Archaeology Anna C. Roosevelt-- Ache Kim Hill and A. Magdalena Hurtado-- Cuiva Bernard Arcand-- Huaorani Laura M. Rival-- Siriono William Balee-- Toba Gaston Gordillo-- Yamana Hernan J. Vidal-- I.III North Eurasia-- Introduction Victor A. Shnirelman and Bruce Grant-- Archaeology Victor A. Shnirelman-- Ainu Tom G. Svensson-- Chuckhi and Yupik Peter P. Schweitzer-- Evenki David G. Anderson-- Itenm'i Victor A. Shnirelman-- Iukagir Anton M. Ivanov-- Ket Evgeniia A. Alekseenko-- Khanti Evdokiia A. Nemysova, Dennis Bartels and Alice Bartels-- Nia (Nganasan) Andrei V. Golovnev-- Nivkh Bruce Grant-- I.IV Africa-- Introduction Robert K. Hitchcock-- Archaeology Peter Robertshaw-- Aka Pygmies Serge Bahuchet-- /Gui and//Gana Jiro Tanaka and Kazuyoshi Sugawara-- Hadza Bwire Kaare and James Woodburn-- Ju'hoansi Megan Biesele and Kxao Royal-/o//oo-- Mbuti Mitsuo Ichikawa-- Mikea Robert L. Kelly, Jean-Francois Rabedimy and Lin Poyer-- Okiek Corinne A. Kratz-- Tyua Robert K. Hitchcock-- I.V South Asia-- Introduction Nurit Bird-David-- Archaeology Kathleen Morrison-- Andaman Islanders Vishvajit Pandya-- Birhor Ashim K. Adhikary-- Chenchu Mark Turin-- Nayaka Nurit Bird-David-- Paliyan Peter M. Gardner-- Hill Pandaram Brian Morris-- Winniyala-aetto Wiveca Stegeborn-- I.VI SouthEast Asia-- Introduction Kirk Endicott-- Archaeology Peter Bellwood-- Agta P. Bion Griffin and Marcus B. Griffin-- Batak James F. Eder-- Batek Kirk Endicott-- Dulong Encheng Song and Chen Shen-- Jahai Cornelia M. I. Van Der Sluys-- Western Penan J. Peter Brosius I.VII Australia-- Introduction Nicolas Peterson-- Archaeology M. A. Smith-- Arrente John Morton-- Cape York peoples David F. Martin-- Kimberley peoples Sandy Toussaint-- Ngarrindjeri Robert Tonkinson-- Pintupi Fred R. Myers-- Tiwi Jane C. Goodale-- Torres Strait Islanders Jeremy Beckett-- Warlpiri Francoise Dussart-- Yolngu Ian Keen-- Part II. Special Topic Essays: II.I Hunter-gatherers, History and Social Theory-- Images of hunters and gatherers in European social thought Alan Barnard-- Archaeology and evolution of hunters and gatherers Andrew B. Smith-- Hunter-gatherers and the mythology of the market John Gowdy-- On the social relations of the hunter-gatherer band Tim Ingold-- II.II Facets of hunter-gatherer life in cross cultural perspective-- Gender relations in hunter-gatherer societies Karen L. Endicott-- Ecological/cosmological knowledge and land management among hunter-gatherers Catherine S. Fowler and Nancy J. Turner-- From totemism to shamanism: hunter-gatherer contributions to world mythology and spirituality Mathias Guenther-- From primitive to pop: foraging and post-foraging hunter-gatherer music Victor Barac-- Traditional and modern visual art of hunting and gathering peoples Howard Morphy-- Hunter-gatherers and human health S. Boyd Eaton, Stanley B. Eaton III-- II.III Hunter-gatherers in a global world-- The Tasaday controversy Gerald D. Berreman-- Hunter-gatherers and the colonial encounter John H. Bodley-- Hunter-gatherer peoples and nation-states David S. Trigger-- Indigenous peoples' rights and the struggle for survival Robert K. Hitchcock-- Indigenous peoples' organizations and advocacy groups-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521571098 20160528
Hunting and gathering is humanity's first and most successful adaptation. Until 12,000 years ago, all humanity lived this way. Surprisingly, in an increasingly urbanized and technological world dozens of hunting and gathering societies have persisted and thrive worldwide, resilient in the face of change, their ancient ways now combined with the trappings of modernity. The Encyclopedia is divided into three parts. The first contains case studies, by leading experts, of over fifty hunting and gathering peoples, in seven major world regions. There is a general introduction and an archaeological overview for each region. Part II contains thematic essays on prehistory, social life, gender, music and art, health, religion, and indigenous knowledge. The final part surveys the complex histories of hunter-gatherers' encounters with colonialism and the state, and their ongoing struggles for dignity and human rights as part of the worldwide movement of indigenous peoples.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521571098 20160528
Green Library
CLASSICS-38-01, CLASSICS-38-01, HUMCORE-1-01, HUMCORE-1-01
Book
402 p. : ill. ; 20 cm.
Green Library
CLASSICS-38-01, CLASSICS-38-01, HUMCORE-1-01, HUMCORE-1-01
Book
xxv, 526 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • List of tables and figures-- Preface-- Note on orthography-- Introduction: !Kung ecology and society-- 1. Fieldwork with the !Kung-- 2. San, Bushman, Basarwa: a question of names-- 3. The Dobe area: its people and their history-- 4. The environment-- 5. Technology and the organisation of production-- 6. An inventory of plant resources-- 7. The mongongo-- 8. Hunting-- 9. Men, women and work-- 10. The allocation of nutritional stress-- 11. Production and reproduction-- 12. Ownership, leadership and the use of space-- 13. Conflict and violence-- 14. Economic and social change in the 1960s and 1970s-- 15. The lessons of the !Kung-- Appendix A-E-- Bibliography-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521295611 20160528
For most of human history hunting and gathering was a universal way of life. Richard Borshay Lee spent over three years conducting fieldwork among the !Kung San, an isolated population of 1,000 in northern Botswana. When Lee began his work in 19863, the !Kung San were one of the last of the world's people to live this life. By 1973, when Lee last lived with the group, it appeared that they !Kung were a society on the threshold of a transformation that signalled the end of foraging as an independent way of life, at least in Africa. The !Kung San: Men, Women and Work in a Foraging Society, an ecological and historical study, is Professor Lee's major statement on his research. By maintaining simultaneous historical and synchronic perspectives, Lee is able to extend his analysis of core features from the contemporary !Kung to prehistoric societies. These basic principles become the means to understanding the form of human life that has been obscured by the developments and complications of societies during the last few thousand years.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521295611 20160528
Green Library
CLASSICS-38-01, CLASSICS-38-01, HUMCORE-1-01, HUMCORE-1-01

14. Peasants [1966 - ]

Book
xii, 116 p. illus. 24 cm.
Green Library, Classics Library, SAL3 (off-campus storage)
CLASSICS-38-01, CLASSICS-38-01, HUMCORE-1-01, HUMCORE-1-01
Book
xv, 336 p. illus. 22 cm.
Green Library
CLASSICS-38-01, CLASSICS-38-01, HUMCORE-1-01, HUMCORE-1-01
Book
162 p. ; 20 cm.
Green Library, SAL3 (off-campus storage)
CLASSICS-38-01, CLASSICS-38-01, HUMCORE-1-01, HUMCORE-1-01