Book
1 online resource : digital, PDF file(s).
  • 1. Introduction-- 2. Opus Caementicium-- 3. Brick barrel vaults-- 4. Complex brick vaults-- 5. Vaulting tubes-- 6. Hollow voussoirs-- 7. Armchair voussoirs-- 8. Structural form-- 9. Vaulting techniques in context.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107059351 20160619
This book studies six vaulting techniques employed in architecture outside of Rome and asks why they were invented where they were and how they were disseminated. Most of the techniques involve terracotta elements in various forms, such as regular flat bricks, hollow voussoirs, vaulting tubes, and armchair voussoirs. Each one is traced geographically via GIS mapping, the results of which are analysed in relation to chronology, geography, and historical context. The most common building type in which the techniques appear is the bath, demonstrating its importance as a catalyst for technological innovation. This book also explores trade networks, the pottery industry, and military movements in relation to building construction, revealing how architectural innovation was influenced by wide ranging cultural factors, many of which stemmed from local influences rather than imperial intervention. Additional resources including extensive searchable databases with bibliographical data and colour illustrations available at www.cambridge.org/vaulting.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107059351 20160619
eReserve
ARCHLGY-118-01, CLASSICS-168-01
Book
xvii, 589 pages : illustrations ; 26 cm.
  • List of Illustrations viii Contributors xiii Maps/General Images xviii Introduction 1 1. Italic Architecture of the Earlier First Millennium BCE6 Jeffrey A. Becker 2. Rome and Her Neighbors: Greek Building Practices inRepublican Rome 27 Penelope J.E. Davies 3. Creating Imperial Architecture 45 Inge Nielsen 4. Columns and Concrete: Architecture from Nero to Hadrian63 Caroline K. Quenemoen 5. The Severan Period 82 Edmund V. Thomas 6. The Architecture of Tetrarchy 106 Emanuel Mayer 7. Architect and Patron 127 James C. Anderson, jr. 8. Plans, Measurement Systems, and Surveying: The RomanTechnology of Pre-Building 140 John R. Senseney 9. Materials and Techniques 157 Lynne C. Lancaster and Roger B. Ulrich 10. Labor Force and Execution 193 Rabun Taylor 11. Urban Sanctuaries: The Early Republic to Augustus207 John W. Stamper 12. Monumental Architecture of Non-Urban Cult Places in RomanItaly 228 Tesse D. Stek 13. Fora 248 James F.D. Frakes 14. Funerary Cult and Architecture 264 Kathryn J. McDonnell 15. Building for an Audience: The Architecture of RomanSpectacle 281 Hazel Dodge 16. Roman Imperial Baths and Thermae 299 Fikret K. Yegul 17. Courtyard Architecture in the Insulae of Ostia Antica324 Roger B. Ulrich 18. Domus/Single Family House 342 John R. Clarke 19. Private Villas: Italy and the Provinces 363 Mantha Zarmakoupi 20. Romanization 381 Louise Revell 21. Streets and Facades 399 Ray Laurence 22. Vitruvius and his Influence 412 Ingrid D. Rowland 23. Ideological Applications: Roman Architecture and FascistRomanita 426 Genevieve S. Gessert 24. Visualizing Architecture Then and Now: Mimesis and theCapitoline Temple of Jupiter Optimus Maximus 446 Melanie Grunow Sobocinski 25. Conservation 462 William Aylward Glossary 480 References 501 Index 565.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781405199643 20160612
A Companion to Roman Architecture presents a comprehensive review of the critical issues and approaches that have transformed scholarly understanding in recent decades in one easy-to-reference volume. * Offers a cross-disciplinary approach to Roman architecture, spanning technology, history, art, politics, and archaeology * Brings together contributions by leading scholars in architectural history * An essential guide to recent scholarship, covering new archaeological discoveries, lesser known buildings, new technologies and space and construction * Includes extensive, up-to-date bibliography and glossary of key Roman architectural terms.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781405199643 20160612
Green Library
ARCHLGY-118-01, CLASSICS-168-01
Book
206 pages : illustrations ; 27 cm.
  • A debate on the Horologium of Augustus : controversy and clarifications (2011) / Lothar Haselberger
  • The Augustus Code : a response to L. Haselberger (2011) / Peter J. Heslin
  • The Horologium on the Campus Martius reconsidered (2011) / Michael Schutz
  • Observations on Augustus' obelisk, meridian, and Ara Pacis, and their symbolic significance in the Bildprogramm of Augustus / John Pollini with Nicholas Cipolla
  • Reconstructing Augustus' Montecitorio obelisk : a gnomonist's point of view / Paolo Albèri Auber
  • New digital simulation studies on the obelisk, meridian, and Ara Pacis of Augustus / Bernard Frischer and John Fillwalk
  • Ancient and modern gnomonics : concerns and classifications / Michael Schütz
  • Horologium and Mausoleum Augusti : an overview of the fieldwork (1979-97) and the existing documentation (2013), with Addendum (2014) / Günter Leonhardt
  • The Horologium of Augustus as a sundial (2011), with Addendum (2013) / Robert Hannah
  • The Horologium of Augustus and its model at Alexandria (2011) / Géza Alföldy
  • Augustus' solar meridian and the Augustan urban program in the northern Campus Martius : attempt at a holistic view / Eugenio La Rocca
  • The 'Horologium' : where do we stand, and where should we go? / Lothar Haselberger.
Green Library
ARCHLGY-118-01, CLASSICS-168-01
Book
xvi, 304 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 27 cm
  • Purpose and setting of the Greek temple
  • Formative developments
  • Questions of construction and the Doric genus
  • Questions of influence and the Aeolic capital
  • Questions of appearance and the Ionic genus
  • Questions of meaning and the Corinthian capital
  • Gifts to the gods
  • Triglyphs and tripods
  • Crucible
  • Questions answered and unanswered.
Green Library
ARCHLGY-118-01, CLASSICS-168-01
Book
216 p. : ill. (chiefly col.), maps (some col.) ; 27 cm.
This is a detailed, yet concise and authoritative survey of the architectural techniques used by the ancient Greeks and Romans. This fascinating volume provides a chronological overview of the methods and materials used in Greek and Roman architecture from the third century B.C. through the fifth century A.D. The first half of the book focuses on Greek architecture, tracing the development and uses of building materials throughout the Aegean region, as well as highlighting key innovations such as the replacement of wooden structures by those made of stone and the development of hoisting systems. The second half is devoted to the Romans, and shows how they not only expanded on the engineering experiments of the Greeks but also developed their own methods and materials. "Constructing the Ancient World" also features a wealth of illustrations of surviving structures, accompanied by concise explanations of the discovery, significance, and historical details, along with precise drawings clearly illustration the various techniques being discussed.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781606060162 20160604
Green Library
ARCHLGY-118-01, CLASSICS-168-01
Book
xxii, 398 p., [47] p. of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 25 cm.
eReserve
ARCHLGY-118-01, CLASSICS-168-01
Book
xv, 287 p. : ill. ; 29 cm.
  • Introduction: the authority of precedent-- 1. Building the Temple of Jupiter Capitolinus-- 2. A new reconstruction of the temple-- 3. Etrusco-Roman temples of the Early Republic-- 4. Assimilation of Hellenistic architecture after the Punic Wars-- 5. The Corinthian Order in the First Century B.C.-- 6. Architecture and ceremony in the time of Pompey and Julius Caesar-- 7. Rebuilding Rome in the time of Augustus-- 8. Augustus and the Temple of Mars Ultor-- 9. Temples and fora of the Flavian Emperors-- 10. Trajan's Forum-- 11. Hadrian's Pantheon-- 12. Hadrian and the Antonines.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521810685 20160528
This book examines the development of Roman temple architecture from its earliest history in the sixth century BC to the reigns of Hadrian and the Antonines in the second century AD. Although archaeologists, architects, and historians have studied the temples of this period since the Renaissance, this book is unique for its specific analysis of Roman temples as a building type. John Stamper analyzes their formal qualities, the public spaces in which they were located and, most importantly, the authority of precedent in their designs. The basis of that authority was the Temple of Jupiter Capitolinus, the city's first and most important temple. Stamper challenges the accepted reconstruction of this temple, proposing a new reconstruction, and assessing its role in the transformation of Rome. He also traces Rome's temple architecture as it evolved over time and how it accommodated changing political and religious contexts, as well as the effects of new stylistic influences.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521810685 20160528
Green Library
ARCHLGY-118-01, CLASSICS-168-01
Book
xxii, 274 p. : ill. ; 29 cm.
  • 1. Introduction-- 2. Centering and formwork-- 3. Ingredients: mortar and caementa-- 4. Amphoras in vaults-- 5. Vaulting ribs-- 6. Metal clamps and tie bars-- 7. Vault behavior and buttressing-- 8. Structural analysis: history and case studies-- 9. Innovations in context.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521842020 20160528
Concrete Vaulted Construction in Imperial Rome examines methods and techniques that enabled builders to construct some of the most imposing monuments of ancient Rome. Focusing on structurally innovative vaulting and the factors that influenced its advancement, Lynne Lancaster also explores a range of related practices, including lightweight pumice as aggregate, amphoras in vaults, vaulting ribs, metal tie bars, and various techniques of buttressing. She provides the geological background of the local building stones and applies mineralogical analysis to determine material provenance, which in turn suggests trading patterns and land use. Lancaster also examines construction techniques in relation to the social, economic, and political contexts of Rome, in an effort to draw connections between changes in the building industry and the events that shaped Roman society from the early empire to late antiquity. This book was awarded the James R. Wiseman Book Award from the Archaeological Institute of America in 2007.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521842020 20160528
Green Library
ARCHLGY-118-01, CLASSICS-168-01
Book
xvi, 303 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
  • 1. Planning and design-- 2. Laying the groundwork-- 3. Walls, piers, and columns-- 4. Complete armatures-- 5. Roofing and vaulting-- 6. Decoration and finishing.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521005838 20160528
How were the architectural ideas behind great Roman building projects carried out in practice? Roman Builders is the first, general interest book to address this question. Using the Baths of Caracalla, the Pantheon, the Coliseum, and the great temples at Baalbek as physical documents for their own building histories, this book traces the thought processes and logistical considerations - the risks, reversals, compromises, and refinements - that led to ultimate success. Each major phase of the building process is considered: design, groundwork, support structures, complex armatures, such as the superstructures of amphitheaters, vaults, and decorations. New hypotheses are advanced on the raising of monolithic columns, the construction sequence of the Coliseum, and the vaulting of the Pantheon. The illustrations include archival and original photographs, as well as numerous explanatory drawings.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521005838 20160528
Green Library
ARCHLGY-118-01, CLASSICS-168-01
Book
viii, 504 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
How did a Roman waterworks work? How were the aqueducts planned and built? What happened to the water before it arrived in the aqueduct and after it left, in catchment, urban distribution and drainage? What were the hydraulics and drainage involved? In a study ranging through the Roman aqueducts of France, Germany, Spain, North Africa, Turkey and Israel, Trevor Hodge introduces us to these often neglected aspects of what the Romans themselves regarded as one of the greatest glories of their civilisation.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780715631713 20160528
Green Library
ARCHLGY-118-01, CLASSICS-168-01
Book
xi, 220 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
  • 1. The literary evidence-- 2. The archaeological evidence: proto-geometric through the seventh century B.C.-- 3. The emergence of the Doric 'Order'-- 4. The emergence of the Ionic 'Order'-- 5. The origins of the orders: reality and theory-- Conclusions: interpretation and implications.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521792455 20160528
Much of our understanding of the origins and early development of the Greek architectural order is based on the writings of ancient authors, such as Vitruvius, and those of modern interpreters. Traditionally, the archaeological evidence has been viewed secondarily and often made to fit within a literary context, despite contradictions that occur. Barbara Barletta's study examines both forms of evidence in an effort to reconcile the two sources, as well as to offer a coherent reconstruction of the origins and early development of the Greek architectural orders. Beginning with the pre-canonical material, she demonstrates that the relatively late emergence of the Doric and Ionic orders arose from contributions of separate regions of the Greek world, rather than a single center. Barletta's reinterpretation of the evidence also assigns greater importance to the often overlooked contributions of Western Greece and the Cycladic Islands.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521792455 20160528
Green Library
ARCHLGY-118-01, CLASSICS-168-01
Book
xi, 270 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 30 cm.
The architects of ancient Rome developed a vibrant and enduring tradition, inspiring those who followed in their profession even to this day. This book explores how Roman architects went about the creative process.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780300081381 20161219
Green Library
ARCHLGY-118-01, CLASSICS-168-01
Book
69 p. : ill. ; 20 cm.
A description of the processes employed by the ancient Greeks in quarrying, dressing, transporting and installing the capital of a monumental Doric column at the Parthenon. The illustrations document the technological sophistication of the early Greek artisans.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
ARCHLGY-118-01, CLASSICS-168-01
Book
xvi, 316 p. : ill. ; 29 cm.
The proceedings of the second Williams Symposium explore the phenomenon of curvature, together with other such "secrets" of classical refinement. Debated ever since the Renaissance, these stunning architectural subtleties are treated here for the first time in a combined effort of international experts. Ranging from painstaking new technical observations to the wider issues of perception and art theory, this well-illustrated volume demonstrates why classical architecture was-and still is-deemed to be perfect.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780924171765 20160527
Green Library
ARCHLGY-118-01, CLASSICS-168-01
Book
xvi, 333 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
  • Part I. Translator's Preface: List of manuscripts and printed editions-- Illustrator's preface-- Part II: The Translation: Book 1-- Book 2-- Book 3-- Book 4-- Book 5-- Book 6-- Book 7-- Book 8-- Book 9-- Book 10-- Part III. Commentary and Illustrations.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521002929 20160528
The only full treatise on architecture and its related arts to survive from classical antiquity, the De Architectura libri decem (Ten Books on Architecture) is the single most important work of architectural history in the Western world, having shaped humanist architecture and the image of the architect from the Renaissance to the present. This new, critical edition of Vitruvius' Ten Books of Architecture is the first to be published for an English-language audience in more than half a century. Expressing the range of Vitruvius' style, the translation, along with the critical commentary and illustrations, aims to shape a new image of the Vitruvius who emerges as an inventive and creative thinker, rather than the normative summarizer, as he was characterized in the Middle Ages and Renaissance.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521002929 20160528
Green Library
ARCHLGY-118-01, CLASSICS-168-01
Book
xxiv, 623 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Society and technology in antiquity: the literary sources on ancient technology-- archaeology as a source for the history of ancient technology-- glossary of weights, measures, and coinage-- the rise of humans and human technology. The sources of energy and basic mechanical devices: sources of energy-- basic machines-- mechanical gadgets-- agriculture-- food processing-- mining and quarrying-- metallurgy-- construction engineering-- hydraulic engineering. Household industry and factory production: metal-working-- wood-working-- textiles and leather-- ceramics and glass-- applied chemistry-- large-scale organized production. Transportation and Trade: land transportation-- sea transportation-- standards of trade. Record-keeping: time-keeping-- writing and book production-- military technology-- attitudes towards labour, innovation and technology.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415061360 20160527
  • Preface and Acknowledgements, List of Abbreviations, List of Illustrations, Introduction: A. Society and Technology in Antiquity, B. The Literary Sources on Ancient Technology, C. Archaeology as a source for the History of Ancient Technology, D. Glossary of Weights, Measures, and Coinage, 1. The Rise of Humans and Human Technology, 2. The sources of Energy and Basic Mechanical Devices: A. Sources of Energy, 2. Basic Machines, C. Mechanical Gadgets, 3. Agriculture, 4. Food Processing, 5. Mining and Quarrying, 6. Metallurgy, 7. Construction Engineering, 8. Hydraulic Engineering, 9. Household Industry and Factory Production: A. Metal-Working, B. Wood-Working, C. Textiles and Leather, D. Ceramics and Glass, E. Applied Chemistry, F. Large-Scale Organized Production, 10. Transportation and Trade: A. Land Transportation, B. Sea Transportation, C. Standards of Trade, 11. Record-Keeping: A. Time-Keeping, B. Writing and Book Production, 12. Military Technology, 13. Attitudes Towards Labour, Innovation, and Technology, Indexes: A. Ancient Sources Translated in the text, B. Subject Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415061377 20160528
In this volume the authors translate and annotate passages from ancient authors with the aim of providing a history and analysis of the origins and development of technology. Among the topics covered are: energy, basic mechanical devices, agriculture, food processing and diet, mining and metallurgy, construction and hydraulic engineering, household industry, transport, trade and military technology. Designed as a sourcebook, it presents 150 ancient authors and a range of literary genres such as the encyclopedic "Natural Histories" of Pliny the Elder, the poetry of Homer and Hesiod, the philosophy of Plato, Aristotle and Lucretius and the agricultural treatise of Varro. The work includes glossaries of technological terminology, indices of authors and subjects, introductions outlining the general significance of the evidence and notes to explain specific details.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415061360 20160527
Green Library
ARCHLGY-118-01, CLASSICS-168-01
Book
269 p. : ill., maps, plans ; 29 cm + 4 folded sheets in pocket inside back cover.
Green Library
ARCHLGY-118-01, CLASSICS-168-01
Book
xxiii, 442 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
The architecture and building of ancient Rome have long been the focus of scholarly study. But until now, no single work has brought together the role of the architect and the building industry against the background of Roman social and political history. In "Roman Architecture and Society" James C. Anderson, Jr., offers the first book to explore fully the place of architecture and the building industry in the context of Roman life. Focusing primarily on Rome and other cities of central Italy, Anderson describes the training, career path and social status of both architects and builders. He explains how the construction industry was organized - from marble and timber suppliers to bricklayers and carpenters. He examines the political, legal and economic factors that determined what would be built, and where. And he shows how the various types of Roman buildings relate to the urban space as a whole. Drawing on ancient literary sources as well as on contemporary scholarship, "Roman Architecture and Society" examines the origins of the architectural achievements, construction techniques and discoveries that have had an incalculable influence on the post-classical Western world. This detailed and concise account should appeal not only to students and scholars of Roman history but to all with an interest in ancient architecture and urban society.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780801855467 20160527
Green Library
ARCHLGY-118-01, CLASSICS-168-01
Book
61 p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
Green Library
ARCHLGY-118-01, CLASSICS-168-01
Book
xviii, 244 p., [8] p. of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 29 cm.
Few sources reveal the life of the ancient Romans as vividly as the houses preserved by the eruption of Vesuvius. Wealthy Romans lavished resources on shaping their surroundings to impress their crowds of visitors. The fashions they set were taken up and imitated by ordinary citizens. This study explores the rich potential of the houses of Pompeii and Herculaneum in order to offer new insights into Roman social life. Combining archaeological evidence with Roman texts and comparative material from other cultures, the author raises a range of new questions. How did the organization of space and the use of decoration help to structure social encounters between owner and visitor, man and woman, master and slave? What sort of "households" did the inhabitants of the Roman house form? Through analyses of the remains of over two hundred houses, Wallace-Hadrill reveals the remarkably dynamic social environment of early imperial Italy, and the vital part that houses came to play in defining what it meant "to live as a Roman.".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691069876 20160528
Green Library, Classics Library
ARCHLGY-118-01, CLASSICS-168-01