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Book
xxxi, 333 p. ; 25 cm.
  • Preface-- Part One: Practices-- 1. Jin-ology-- 2. The Manic Preface: Jin Shengtan's (1608-1661)-- 3. A Cure for Melancholy: Yuan Hongdao (1568-1610) and the Qifa (the Seven Stimuli)-- 4. Tears of Ressentiment: Zhang Zhupo's (1670-1698) Jin Ping Mei-- Part Two: Intervention-- 5. Tiger and Yinfu-- 6. Red Shoes, Footbindings and the Swing-- 7. A Cat, a Dog, the Killing of Livestock-- 8. Very Close to yinfu and enu or How Prefaces Matter for JPM (1695) and Enu Shu (Taipei, 1995).
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780822329015 20160528
In "Obscene Things" Naifei Ding intervenes in conventional readings "Jing Ping Mei", an early scandalous Chinese novel of sexuality and sexual culture. After first appearing around 1590, "Jing Ping Mei" was circulated among some of China's best known writers of the time and subsequently published in three major recensions. A 1695 version by Zhang Zhupo became the most widely read and it is this text in particular on which Ding focuses. Challenging the preconceptions of earlier scholarship, she highlights the fundamental misogyny inherent in "Jing Ping Mei" and demonstrates how traditional biases - particularly masculine biases - continue to inform the concerns of modern criticism and sexual politics. The story of a seductive bondmaid - concubine, sexual opportunism and domestic intrigue, death, and adultery, "Jing Ping Mei" has often been critiqued based on the coherence of the text itself. Concentrating instead on the processes of reading and on the social meaning of this novel, Ding looks at the various ways the tale has been received since its first dissemination, particularly by critiquing the interpretations offered by seventeenth-century Ming literati and by twentieth-century scholars. Confronting the gender politics of this 'pornographic' text, she troubles the boundaries between pre-modern and modern readings by engaging residual and emergent Chinese gender and hierarchic ideologies. By arguing from the standpoint of feminism, "Obscene Things" will contribute to studies of Chinese literature, Asian studies, feminism, politics of sexuality, and cultural studies.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780822329015 20160528
Green Library
CHINLIT-369-01
Book
5 v. : ill.; 24 cm.
  • LIST OF I LLUSTRATIONS ix ACKNOWLEDGMENTS xi CAST OF CHARACTERS xiii CHAPTER 41: Hsi-men Ch'ing Forms a Marriage Alliance with Ch'iao Hung-- P'an Chin-lien Engages in a Quarrel with Li P'ing-erh 1 CHAPTER 42: APowerful Family Blocks Its Gate in Order to Enjoy Fireworks-- Distinguished Guests in a High Chamber Appreciate the Lanterns 19 CHAPTER 43: Because of the Missing Gold Hsi-men Ch'ing Curses Chin-lien-- As a Result of the Betrothal Yueh-niang Meets Madame Ch'iao 40 CHAPTER 44: Wu Yueh-niang Detains Li Kuei-chieh Overnight-- Hsi-men Ch'ing Drunkenly Interrogates Hsia-hua 65 CHAPTER 45: Li Kuei-chieh Requests the Retention of Hsia-hua-- Wu Yueh-niang in a Fit of Anger Curses at Tai-an 81 CHAPTER 46: Rain and Snow Interrupt a Walk during the Lantern Festival-- Wife and Concubines Laughingly Consult the Tortoise Oracle 97 CHAPTER 47: Wang Liu-erh Peddles Influence in Pursuit of Profit-- Hsi-men Ch'ing Accepts a Bribe and Subverts the Law 129 CHAPTER 48: Investigating Censor Tseng Impeaches the Judicial Commissioners-- Grand Preceptor Ts'ai Submits a Memorial Regarding Seven Matters 147 CHAPTER 49: Hsi-men Ch'ing Welcomes Investigating Censor Sung Ch'iao-nien-- In the Temple of Eternal Felicity He Encounters an Indian Monk 171 CHAPTER 50: Ch'in-t'ung Eavesdrops on the Joys of Lovemaking-- Tai-an Enjoys a Pleasing Ramble in Butterfly Lane 203 CHAPTER 51: Yueh-niang Listens to the Exposition Of The Diamond Sutra-- Li Kuei-chieh Seeks Refuge in the Hsi-men Ch'ing Household 221 CHAPTER 52: Ying Po-chueh Intrudes on a Spring Beauty in the Grotto-- P'an Chin-lien Inspects a Mushroom in the Flower Garden 255 CHAPTER 53: Wu Yueh-niang Engages in Coition in Quest of Male Progeny-- Li P'ing-erh Fulfills a Vow in Order to Safeguard Her Son 289 CHAPTER 54: Ying Po-chueh Convenes His Friends in a Suburban Garden-- Jen Hou-ch'i Diagnoses an Illness for a Powerful Family 320 CHAPTER 55: Hsi-men Ch'ing Observes a Birthday in the Eastern Capital-- Squire Miao from Yang-chou Sends a Present of Singing Boys 346 CHAPTER 56: Hsi-men Ch'ing Assists Ch'ang Shih-chieh-- Ying Po-chueh Recommends Licentiate Shui 374 CHAPTER 57: Abbot Tao Solicits Funds to Repair the Temple of Eternal Felicity-- Nun Hsueh Enjoins Paying for the Distribution of the Dharan Sutra 394 CHAPTER 58: Inspired by a Fit of Jealousy Chin-lien Beats Ch'iu-chu-- Begging Cured Pork the Mirror Polisher Tells a Sob Story 420 CHAPTER 59: Hsi-men Ch'ing Dashes "Snow Lion" to Death-- Li P'ing-erh Cries Out in Pain for Kuan-ko 453 CHAPTER 60: Li P'ing-erh Becomes Ill Because of Suppressed Anger-- Hsi-men Ch'ing's Silk Goods Store Opens for Business 489 NOTES 507 BIBLIOGRAPHY 639 INDEX 673.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691125343 20160528
In this third volume of a planned five-volume series, David Roy provides a complete and annotated translation of the famous "Chin P'ing Mei", an anonymous sixteenth-century Chinese novel that focuses on the domestic life of His-men Ch'ing, a corrupt, upwardly mobile merchant who maintains a harem of six wives and concubines. This work, known primarily for its erotic realism, is also a landmark in the development of narrative art - not only from a specifically Chinese perspective but also in a world-historical context. Written during the second half of the sixteenth century and first published in 1618, "The Plum in the Golden Vase" is noted for its surprisingly modern technique. With the possible exception of "The Tale of Genji" (ca. 1010) and "Don Quixote" (1605, 1615), there is no earlier work of prose fiction of equal sophistication in world literature. Although its importance in the history of Chinese narrative has long been recognized, the technical virtuosity of the author, which is more reminiscent of the Dickens of "Bleak House", the Joyce of "Ulysses", or the Nabokov of "Lolita" than anything in earlier Chinese fiction, has not yet received adequate recognition. This is partly because all of the existing European translations are either abridged or based on an inferior recension of the text. This translation and its annotation aim to faithfully represent and elucidate all the rhetorical features of the original in its most authentic form and thereby enable the Western reader to appreciate this Chinese masterpiece at its true worth. Replete with convincing portrayals of the darker side of human nature, it should appeal to anyone interested in a compelling story, compellingly told.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691125343 20160528
Green Library
CHINLIT-369-01