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Book
xvi, 322 p. : ill. (some col.), maps ; 24 cm.
  • List of Illustrations Genealogical Chart of the Zhang Family and Their Collateral Kin Prologue 1 Jining, Shandong (1893-1895) 2 Tang Yaoqing, Guixiu (1763-1831) 3 Zhang Qieying, Poet (1792-after 1863) 4 Wang Caipin, Governess (1826-1893) Epilogue. The Historian Says ... Zhang Family Chronology Glossary of Names Glossary of Terms Appendix. Selected Poems and Song Lyrics Notes References Acknowledgments Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520250901 20160528
The history of China in the nineteenth century usually features men as the dominant figures in a chronicle of warfare, rebellion, and dynastic decline. This book challenges that model and provides a different account of the era, history as seen through the eyes of women. Basing her remarkable study on the poetry and memoirs of three generations of literary women of the Zhang family - Tang Yaoqing, her eldest daughter, and her eldest granddaughter - Susan Mann illuminates a China that has been largely invisible. Drawing on a stunning array of primary materials - published poetry, gazetteer articles, memorabilia - as well as a variety of other historical documents, Mann reconstructs these women's intimate relationships, personal aspirations, values, ideas, and political consciousness. She transforms our understanding of gender relations and what it meant to be an educated woman during China's transition from empire to nation and offers a new view of the history of late imperial women.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520250901 20160528
hdl.handle.net ACLS Humanities E-Book
Green Library
CHINGEN-136-01, CHINGEN-236-01
Book
xiii, 310 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
  • List of Illustrations Acknowledgments Editors' Introduction Guide for Students and Teachers 1. Biography of the Daoist Saint Wang Fengxian by Du Guangting (850 - 933) Translated by Suzanne Cahill This biography of an important Daoist female saint of the mid-ninth century chronicles her life from childhood through her spiritual self-cultivation, culminating in her ascension to heaven. 2. Biography of the Great Compassionate One of Xiangshan by Jiang Zhiqi (1031 - 1104) Translated by Chun-fang Yu The earliest documentary evidence of the legend of Miaoshan, this stone inscription shows how the local story of a Chinese princess became identified with a universal Buddhist deity, the Bodhisattva Guanyin. 3. The Book of Filial Piety for Women Attributed to a Woman Nee Zheng (ca. 730) Translated by Patricia Buckley Ebrey The excerpt from this classic appears opposite corresponding passages from the original Book of Filial Piety to highlight the differences gender makes in the text and its messages. 4. Funerary Writings by Chen Liang (1143-1194) Translated by Beverly Bossler These three funerary odes describe how the funeral tablets of Chen Liang's mother's family came to be in his care, how his mother and her sister decided to marry their children together, and how his sister sustained her natal household during a period of family calamity. Along with the commemorative biography that follows, they open important windows on domestic life and family values during the period following the fall of the Northern Song. 5. "The Customs of Various Barbarians" by Li Jing (1251 - ?) Translated by Jacqueline M. Armijo-Hussein This description of minority peoples from a Yuan dynasty official's record of his experiences in Yunnan province illustrates how views of gender relations and especially sexual practices served as a measure of the level of civilization among non-Han populations. 6. Selected Writings by Luo Rufang (1515 - 1588) Translated by Yu-Yin Cheng In these writings scholar and philosopher Luo Rufang celebrates women who pursue intellectual and philosophical interests. He also champions the virtue of motherly nurturance and love, which he considered as important as the central Confucian virtues of filial piety and brotherly respect. 7. Final Instructions by Yang Jisheng (1516 - 1555) Translated by Beverly Bossler Composed in prison, these notes instruct Yang's wife and sons how to get along without him. His foremost concerns are three: that his family not become the subject of ridicule, that his sons get along with one another, and that his wife--who had already proven herself the moral conscience of the family--not commit suicide. 8. "Record of Past Karma" by Ji Xian (1614 - 1683) Translated by Grace S. Fong This autobiographical essay by the woman poet Ji Xian , with its powerful descriptions of dreams, visions, and personal illness, is unusually self-revelatory of the tensions between her personal religious desires and her obligations to her family. 9. "Letter to My Sons" by Gu Ruopu (1592 - ca.1681) Translated by Dorothy Ko Having seen to it that both sons married capable and learned wives, Hangzhou poet Gu Ruopu, virtuous widow and matriarch of the Huang family, decided to divide the family property and establish separate households for them. In this letter Gu outlines her support for the Confucian ideal of familism, but admonishes her sons to recognize women's indispensable roles in the male-centered kinship system. 10. Personal Letters in Seventeenth-Century Epistolary Guides Translated by Kathryn Lowry The large number of epistolary guides and collected letters published in the late Ming include models for letters to family members as well as a few examples of love letters and provide a unique view of the social universe of that period. The love letters translated here show how this genre can be read as a sort of epistolary fiction and raise questions about how people might have consulted letter-writing manuals for reasons beyond social etiquette. 11. Letters by Women of the Ming-Qing Period Translated by Yu-Yin Cheng These short letters, written in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, reveal the erudition and wit as well as the spiritual and aesthetic sensibilities of highly educated upper-class women. 12. Selected Short Works by Wang Duanshu (1621 - after 1701) Translated by Ellen Widmer These short selections from the works of one of the earliest anthologists of women's writings display the extraordinary range and breadth of her learning, while revealing her personal, aesthetic, and scholarly sensibilities. 13. Two Ghost Stories from Liaozhai's Records of the Strange by Pu Songling (1640 - 1715) Translated by Judith T. Zeitlin The ghost story, authored by men and narrated from the male point of view, is one of the privileged spaces in Chinese literature for exploring fantasies of gender and sexuality. Such tales often involve a passionate affair between a young scholar and a beautiful female ghost who possesses a surprising degree of corporeality. The two late imperial tales translated here share two related themes: the power of love to triumph over death and the cosmic power of male generativity. 14. Two Biographies by Zhang Xuecheng (1738 - 1801) Translated by Susan Mann These biographies by one of the most distinguished scholars of the Qing period breathe life into views of women that are sometimes dismissed as mere conventions or stereotypes. In both texts we see, through men's eyes, how women took responsibility for setting the standards to measure and criticize men's behavior. 15. Poems on Tea-Picking Translated by Weijing Lu These poems about women at work, written mostly by men and spanning the dynasties from Tang through Qing, display the varied meanings of women's work in the poetic imagery of elite writers and point to the ways in which women as literary subjects supplied a ceaseless range of possibilities for inventive poets over time. The poems also show the subtle relationship between poetry as social criticism and poetry as aesthetic performance in the culture of the late imperial elite. 16. Drinking Wine and Reading "Encountering Sorrow": A Reflection in Disguise by Wu Zao (1799 - 1862) Translated by Sophie Volpp In this dramatic tableau the playwright casts herself as the sole speaker. She poses before a portrait of herself cross-dressed as a male scholar and sings to the portrait a sequence of lyrics describing her frustrations as a woman of talent. The text concludes that none but her cross-dressed self-image is a match for the writer herself. Hangzhou poet and official Chen Wenshu, a noted patron of female writers, wrote a collection of poems celebrating this work. 17. A Brief Record of the Eastern Ocean by Ding Shaoyi (fl. 1847) Translated by Emma Jinhua Teng During his eight-month stay in Taiwan in 1847 Ding Shaoyi wrote the Brief Record, which treats sixteen topics, among them: taxes, schools, coastal defense, local products, "savage" villages, "savage" customs, and marvels. When he returned to Taiwan in 1871 he appended new material to each item in his original account. The passage translated here is Ding's 1871 supplement to his original entry titled "Savage Customs." 18. The "Eating Crabs" Youth Book Translated by Mark C. Elliott This anonymous bilingual text, in Manchu and Chinese, reflects the complex ethnic picture in late imperial China, particularly in and around Beijing. Youth books were a form of oral performance very popular in the Qing capital. In this particular one, the story is told of a hapless Manchu bannerman and his shrewish Han Chinese wife who run afoul of a pot of feisty crabs. Glossaries and References Contributors Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520222762 20160528
These translations of eighteen classical Chinese texts from the mid-ninth century (Tang dynasty) through the late nineteenth century (Qing dynasty) offer a comprehensive collection of primary sources focusing on gender issues in medieval and late imperial China. The book's title reflects the sometimes ironic relationship between Confucian viewpoints and women's visibility in Chinese historical documents. The texts, written by both men and women, show that Confucian values and scholarly practices produced a rich documentary record of women's lives.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520222762 20160528
Green Library
CHINGEN-136-01, CHINGEN-236-01
Book
xii, 326 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
This first book-length study of gender relations in the Lower Yangzi region during the High Qing era (c. 1683-1839) challenges enduring late-nineteenth-century perspectives that emphasized the oppression and subjugation of Chinese women. Placing women at the center of the High Qing era shows how gender relations shaped the economic, political, social, and cultural changes of the age, and gives us a sense of what women felt and believed, and what they actually did, during this period. Most analyses of gender in High Qing times have focused on literature and on the writings of the elite; this book broadens the scope of inquiry to include women's work in the farm household, courtesan entertainment, and women s participation in ritual observances and religion. In dealing with literature, it shows how women's poetry can serve the historian as well as the literary critic, drawing on one of the first anthologies of women's writing compiled by a woman to examine not only literary sensibilities and intimate emotions, but also political judgments, moral values, and social relations.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804727433 20160528
Green Library
CHINGEN-136-01, CHINGEN-236-01
Book
ix, 395 p. : ill., map ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction: gender and the politics of Chinese history-- Part I. Social and Private Histories: 1. In the floating world: women and commercial publishing-- 2. The enchantment of love in The Poetry Pavilion-- Part II. Womanhood: 3. Margins of domesticity: enlarging the women's sphere-- 4. Talent, virtue, and beauty: rewriting womanhood-- Part III. Women's culture: 5. Domestic communities: male and female domains-- 6. Social and public communities: genealogies across time and space-- 7. Transitory communities: courtesan, wife, and professional artist-- Epilogue-- Reference matter-- Notes-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804723589 20160528
This pathbreaking work argues that literate gentry women in seventeenth-century Jiangnan, far from being oppressed or silenced, created a rich culture and meaningful existence within the constraints of the Confucian system. Momentous socioeconomic and intellectual changes in seventeenth-century Jiangnan provided the stimulus for the flowering of women's culture. The most salient of these changes included a flourishing of commercial publishing, the rise of a reading public, a new emphasis on emotions, the promotion of women's education, and, more generally, the emergence of new definitions of womanhood. The author reconstructs the social, emotional, and intellectual worlds of seventeenth-century women, and in doing so provides a new way to conceptualize China's past, one offering a more realistic and complete understanding of the values of Chinese culture and the functioning of Chinese society.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804723589 20160528
hdl.handle.net ACLS Humanities E-Book
Green Library
CHINGEN-136-01, CHINGEN-236-01
Book
163 p., [6] p. of plates : ill., maps ; 18 cm.
Six Records of a Floating Life (1809) is an extraordinary blend of autobiography, love story and social document written by a man who was educated as a scholar but earned his living as a civil servant and art dealer. In this intimate memoir, Shen Fu recounts the domestic and romantic joys of his marriage to Yun, the beautiful and artistic girl he fell in love with as a child. He also describes other incidents of his life, including how his beloved wife obtained a courtesan for him and reflects on his travels through China. Shen Fu's exquisite memoir shows six parallel layers' of one man's life, loves and career, with revealing glimpses into Chinese society of the Ch'ing Dynasty.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780140444292 20160528
Green Library
CHINGEN-136-01, CHINGEN-236-01
Book
xii, 243 p. : diagrs., maps ; 23 cm.
Green Library
CHINGEN-136-01, CHINGEN-236-01

7. Six Yüan plays [1972]

Book
285 p. 19 cm.
  • Chi, C. The orphan of Chao.--Chêng, T. The soul of Chʻien-Nü leaves her body.--Kuan, H. The injustice done to Tou Ngo.--Li, H. Chang boils the sea.--Ma, C. Autumn in Han Palace.--A stratagem of interlocking rings.
Green Library
CHINGEN-136-01, CHINGEN-236-01