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Book
xi, 316 pages ; 24 cm
This volume first explores the transformation of Chinese Daoism in late imperial period through the writings of prominent literati scholars of the period. In such a cultural context it then launches an in-depth investigation into the Daoist dimensions of the Chinese narrative masterpiece, The Story of the Stone: the inscriptions of Quanzhen Daoism in the infrastructure of its religious framework, the ideological ramifications of the Daoist concepts of chaos, purity, and the natural, as well as the Daoist images of the gourd, fish, and bird. The author demonstrates in an insightful manner the central position of Daoist philosophy both in the ideological structure of the Stone and the literati culture that spawns it.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789629964979 20160612
Green Library
CHINA-369-01
Book
xii, 250 p. ; 24 cm.
Fictions of Enlightenment is the first book to examine the fascinating and intricate relationship between Buddhism and the development of Chinese vernacular fiction. Qiancheng Li brings Buddhist models to bear on the vision, structure, and narrative form of three classics of late imperial literature - Journey to the West, Tower of Myriad Mirrors, and Dream of the Red Chamber - arguing that by fashioning their plots after the narratives of certain Mahayana sutras, the novelists transformed Buddhist concepts into narrative structures. Within the traditional Chinese novel Li even defines a new genre: the fiction of enlightenment. Following a discussion of the often neglected Buddhist milieu in the literary landscape of the late Ming to the mid-Qing period, Li sets the context for the study of the novels. The Buddhist soteriological model was first established by the religion's founder and reenacted in sutras, such as the pilgrimages of Sadaprarudita and Sudhana. In the search for enlightenment, however, another pattern develops, a significant variation that appears to be a subversion of the Buddhist quest. This is characterized by an embrace of the phenomenal world as a result of the Mahayana understanding of the intrinsic relationship between samsara and nirvana. In this context, then, Journey to the West owes much to the model of pilgrimage and variations of it become the philosophical basis of Tower of Myriad Mirrors and Dream of the Red Chamber, which are characterized by movement away from the road and wilderness to the family. The settings of these novels change, corresponding to a shift in emphasis. Tower departs from Journey in its exploration of the tensions between and interdependence of enlightenment and desire. Dream both makes extensive use of the soteriological patterns and subverts them, turning itself into the consummate "fiction of enlightenment" and at the same time an elegy of love. Richly documented and researched, Fictions of Enlightenment will inform and instruct those in the fields of Buddhist studies; Chinese literature, religion, and history; and comparative religion and literature.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780824825973 20160528
Green Library
CHINA-369-01
Book
x, 324 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
The frequent appearance of androgyny in Ming and Qing literature has long interested scholars of late imperial Chinese culture. A flourishing economy, widespread education, rising individualism, a prevailing hedonism - all of these had contributed to the gradual disintegration of traditional gender roles in late Ming and early Qing China (1550-1750) and given rise to the phenomenon of androgyny. Now, Zuyan Zhou sheds new light on this important period, offering a highly original and astute look at the concept of androgyny in key works of Chinese fiction and drama from the sixteenth to the eighteenth centuries. The work begins with an exploration of androgyny in Chinese philosophy and Ming-Qing culture. Zhou proceeds to examine chronologically the appearance of androgyny in major literary writing of the time, yielding novel interpretations of canonical works from The Plum in the Golden Vase, through the scholar-beauty romances, to The Dream of the Red Chamber. He traces the ascendance of the androgyny craze in the late Ming, its culmination in the Ming-Qing transition, and its gradual phasing out after the mid-Qing. The study probes deviations from engendered codes of behavior both in culture and literature, then focuses on two parallel areas: androgyny in literary characterization and androgyny in literati identity. The author concludes that androgyny in late Ming and early Qing literature is essentially the dissident literati's stance against tyrannical politics, a psychological strategy to relieve anxiety over growing political inferiority.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780824825713 20160528
Green Library
CHINA-369-01
Book
xii, 286 p. ; 24 cm.
Green Library
CHINA-369-01
Book
xii, 353 p. ; 24 cm.
In the traditional Chinese symbolic vocabulary, the construction of gender was never far from debates about ritual propriety, desire, and even cosmic harmony. Competing Discourses maps the aesthetic and semantic meanings associated with gender in the Ming-Qing vernacular novel through close readings of five long narratives: Marriage Bonds to Awaken the World, Dream of the Red Chamber, A Country Codger's Words of Exposure, Flowers in the Mirror, and A Tale of Heroic Lovers. Epstein argues that the authors of these novels manipulated gendered terms to achieve structural coherence. These patterns are, however, frequently at odds with other gendered structures in the texts, and authors exploited these conflicts to discuss the problem of orthodox behavior versus the cult of feeling.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674005129 20160528
Green Library
CHINA-369-01
Book
viii, 347 p. ; 24 cm.
In this new study of desire in Late Imperial China, Martin W. Huang argues that the development of traditional Chinese fiction as a narrative genre was closely related to changes in conceptions of the fundamental nature of desire. He further suggests that the rise of vernacular fiction during the late Ming dynasty should be studied in the context of contemporary debates on desire, along with the new and complex views that emerged from those debates. Desire and Fictional Narrative in Late China shows that the obsession of authors with individual desire is an essential quality that defines traditional Chinese fiction as a narrative genre. Thus the maturation of the genre can best be appreciated in terms of its increasingly sophisticated exploration of the phenomenon of desire.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
CHINA-369-01
Book
xi, 213 p. ; 23 cm.
  • 1. Ideal and Actual, Real and Not-real 2. "Family Togetherness": Patterns of Authority and the Subversion of Family Structure 3. Preexisting Conditions: Retributory Illness and the Limits of Medicine 4. A World Apart: Poetry and Society in the Garden of Total Vision 5. The Chiming of the Void: Poetry as a Vehicle to Enlightenment.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780231114073 20160528
-- Mary Scott, Journal of Asian Studies.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780231114073 20160528
Green Library
CHINA-369-01
Book
xv, 321 p. ; 25 cm.
The 18th-century "Hongloumeng", known in English as "Dream of the Red Chamber" or "The Story of the Stone" is considered to be one of the greatest of Chinese novels, blending realism and romance, psychological motivation and fate, daily life and mythical occurences, as it narrates the decline of a powerful Chinese family. This study examines the novel as a story about fictive representation. Through literary devices, the novel challenges the authority of history as well as referential biases in reading. This text argues that at the heart of the novel is the narration of desire. Desire appears in this tale as the defining trait and problem of human beings and, at the same time, shapes the novel's literary invention and effect. Through close readings of selected episodes, the text analyzes principal motifs of the narrative, such as dream, mirror, literature, religious enlightenment, and rhetorical reflexivity in relation to fictive representation. It contextualizes its discussion with a comprehensive genealogy of "quing" - desire, disposition, sentiment, feeling - a concept of fundamental importance in historical Chinese culture, and shows how the text exploits its multiple meanings.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691015613 20160528
Green Library
CHINA-369-01
Book
xii, 237 p. ;23 cm.
  • Introduction-- 1. The problematic literati self and autobiographical sensibility in the novel-- 2. The self masqueraded: auto/biographical strategies in The Scholars-- 3. The self displaced: women and growing up in The Dream of the Red Chamber-- 4. The self reinvented: memory and forgetfulness in The Humble Words of an Old Rustic-- Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804724623 20160528
This study of the traditional Chinese novel focuses on autobiographical features of The Dream of the Red Chamber (Honglu meng), The Scholars (Rulin waishi), and the relatively neglected Humble Words of an Old Rustic (Yesou puyan). The author seeks to answer the question why the Chinese novel was becoming increasingly autobiographical during the eighteenth century, even as explicitly autobiographical writing was declining. He suggests that several new trends in the development of the genre (such as literati-ization) and the changing status of the literati contributed to the rise of this new feature. As office-holding became increasingly unavailable, new roles and identities that allowed the literati to retain a claim to membership in the elite had to be found. The novel, with its ability to distance an author from himself, facilitated the exploration of alternative roles and identities.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804724623 20160528
Green Library
CHINA-369-01
Book
181 p.
This text is an analysis of Chinese perceptions of gender as represented in Cao Xueqin's 18th-century Chinese novel of manners, "The Red Chamber Dream" or "The Story of the Stone". Drawing on feminist literary critical methods, it examines Qing notions of masculinity and femininity, including themes such as bisexuality, motherhood, virginity and purity, and gender and power. The central aim of the text is to challenge the common assumption that the novel represents some form of early Chinese feminism by examining the text in conjunction with historical data. The text should be of value to those interested in issues of gender in China, the history of Chinese literary criticism and the application of feminist theory to the Asian text.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789004101234 20160528
Green Library
CHINA-369-01
Book
294 p.
Green Library
CHINA-369-01