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Book
xix, 302 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Inscribing the past : a history of Chinese history
  • The perennial dangers of direct criticism
  • Praise, blame, and the modes of judgement
  • Inscribing the text : a history of the history of the Han
  • "True editions" and Qing skepticism
  • Structure and sources of the history of the Han
  • Accretions and additions
  • From Han to PRC : filiations of transmission
  • Inscribing the family : a history of the Ban clan
  • Ban Gu, Sima Qian, and rewriting the past
  • Inscribing genealogy
  • Ban Bo and the family's rise to a consort clan
  • Narrating through the dangers of court
  • Historicizing advantage : highlighting privilege, loyalty, and influence
  • Inscribing the self : Ban Gu's positioning of text and self
  • Eclipse of the imperial family : Wang Mang and the Liu eviction
  • Constructing Wang Mang : duplicity, omenology, and despotism
  • Inheriting family principles in the wake of political collapse
  • Ban Gu : filial son and favored historian
  • A new heaven, a new mandate
  • Inscribing the state : killing snakes, chasing deer, and reconceiving heaven's mandate
  • Heaven and its mandate : earlier assumptions and later innovations
  • Killing snakes : legitimizing the Han's mandate
  • Chasing deer : a predetermined and permanent mandate
  • Zan : a final appraisal.
Green Library
CHINA-209-01
Book
7, 7, 3, 230 p. ; 21 cm.
Green Library
CHINA-209-01
Book
xi, 237 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction --- The Context: Early Imperial China --- Kinship --- Wealth and Work --- Law --- Government --- Learning --- Ritual --- Cosmology-- Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780742518728 20160528
Filling a conspicuous gap in the scholarship on both Chinese history and gender studies, this introductory survey offers the first sustained history of women in the early imperial era. Drawing on extensive primary and secondary sources in Chinese and Japanese, Bret Hinsch paints a remarkably detailed picture of the distant past. His introductory chapters orient the nonspecialist to early imperial Chinese society; subsequent chapters explore women's roles from the multiple perspectives of kinship, wealth and work, law, government, learning, ritual, and cosmology. A rich array of line drawings, a Chinese-character glossary, and extensive notes and bibliography enhance the author's discussion. Historians and students of gender and early China alike will find this book an invaluable survey of the field. Visit our website for sample chapters!.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780742518728 20160528
After a long spell of chaos, the Qin and Han dynasties (221 BCE-220 CE) saw the unification of the Chinese Empire under a single ruler, government, and code of law. During this era, changing social and political institutions affected the ways people conceived of womanhood. New ideals were promulgated, and women's lives gradually altered to conform to them. And under the new political system, the rulers' consorts and their families obtained powerful new roles that allowed women unprecedented influence in the highest level of government. Filling a conspicuous gap in the scholarship on both Chinese history and gender studies, this book offers the first sustained history of women in the early imperial era. Drawing on extensive primary and secondary sources in Chinese and Japanese, Bret Hinsch paints a remarkably detailed picture of the distant past. His introductory chapters orient the nonspecialist to early imperial Chinese society; subsequent chapters discuss women's roles from the multiple perspectives of kinship, wealth and work, law, government, learning, ritual, and cosmology. A rich array of line drawings, a Chinese-character glossary, and extensive notes and bibliography enhance the text. Historians and students of gender and early China alike will find this book an invaluable survey of the field.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780742518711 20160528
Green Library
CHINA-209-01
Book
xiv, 192 p. ; 24 cm.
While China has a long tradition of lexicography and of phonological studies, there is, unlike in Europe and India, no tradition of descriptive or prescriptive grammar. "Outline of Classical Chinese Grammar" fills this gap and is the first comprehensive introduction to syntactical analysis of classical Chinese. The book focuses on the language of the high classical period, approximately from the time of Confucius to the unification of the empire by Qin and Han at the end of the third century "bc", and pays particular attention to the Mencius, the Lunyu, and, to a lesser extent, the Zuozhuan texts, which are of central importance not only in themselves but also as models for later writers. "Outline of Classical Chinese Grammar" starts with a brief historical overview and a discussion of the relation between the writing system and the phonology. This is followed by a short section outlining overall rpicnciples of word order and sentence structure. The next sections deal with the main sentence types - nominal predicates, verbal predicates, and numerical expressions, which constitute a special type of quasiverbal predication. The final sections cover topics such as subordinate constituents of sentences, nondeclarative sentence types and complex sentences. Examples, which are given in pinyin romanization as well as in Chinese characters and with English translations, are numbered consecutively throughout the text for ease of cross-reference. An index and a glossary of technical linguistic terminology complete the text.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780774805056 20160528
Outline of Classical Chinese Grammar is a comprehensive introduction to the syntactical analysis of classical Chinese. Focusing on the language of the high classical period, which ranges from the time of Confucius to the unification of the empire by Qin in 221, the book pays particular attention to the Mencius, the Lunyu, and, to a lesser extent, the Zuozhuan texts.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780774805414 20160528
Green Library
CHINA-209-01
Book
v.
  • Acknowledgments-- Introduction-- On Using This Book-- Weights and Measures-- List of AbbreviationsMemoir 29 (William H. Nienhauser, Jr. , translator)-- Memoir 30 (Stephen Durrant, translator)-- Memoir 31 (Meghan Cai and Qian Liu, translators)-- Memoir 32 (Wang Jing, translator)-- Memoir 33 (Reinhard Emmerich, translator)-- Memoir 34 (Zhao Hua, translator)-- Memoir 35 (William H. Nienhauser, Jr., translator)-- Memoir 36 (William H. Nienhauser, Jr., translator)-- Memoir 37 (Hans van Ess, translator)-- Memoir 38 (Michael Schimmelpfennig, translator)-- Memoir 39 (Christian Meyer, translator)-- Memoir 40 (Judith Suwald, translator)-- Memoir 41 (Marc Nurnberger, translator)-- Memoir 42 (Hans van Ess, translator)-- Memoir 43 (Wang Jing, translator)-- Memoir 44 (Hans van Ess, translator)Frequently Mentioned Commentators-- Biographical Sketches of Shih chi Commentators (Erich Haenisch and Liu Po-chuang)-- Erratum-- Selected Recent Studies of the Shih chi-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780253340283 20160528
  • Dedication Acknowledgements Introduction On Using This Book A Note on Chronology Weights and Measures List of Abbreviations Po Yi, Memoir Kuan Yi-wu and Yen Ying, Memoir Lao Tzu and Han Fei, Memoir Marshal Jang-chu, Memoir Sun Tzu and Wu ChOi, Memoir Wu Tzu Hsu, Memoir ConfiuciusOs Disciples, Memoir The Lord of Shang, Memoir Su ChOin, Memoir Chang Yi, Memoir Shu-li Tzu and Kan Mao, Memoir The Marquis of Jang, Memoir Pai ChOi and Wang Chien, Memoir Meng Tzu and Excellency Hsun, Memoir The Lord of Meng-chOang, Memoir The Lord of POing-yuan and Excellency Yu, Memoir The Noble Scion of Wei, Memoir The Lord of ChOun-shen, Memoir Fan Sui and TsOai Tse, Memoir Yueh Yi, Memoir Lien POo and Lin Hsiang-ju, Memoir TOien Tan, Memoir Lu Chung Lien and Tsou Yang, Memoir ChOu Yuan and Scholar Chia, Memoir Lu Pu-wei, Memoir The Assassin-Retainers, Memoir Li Ssu, Memoir Meng TOien, Memoir Bibliography Index Maps.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780253340276 20160528
  • Dedication Acknowledgements Introduction On Using This Book A Note on Chronology Weights and Measures List of Abbreviations The Five Emperors, Basic Annals One The Hsia, Basic Annals Two The Yin, Basic Annals Three The Chou, Basic Annals Four The ChOin, Basic Annals Five The First Emperor of ChOin, Basic Annals Six Hsiang Yu, Basic Annals Seven Bibliography Index Maps.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780253340214 20160528
  • Acknowledgments Introduction: Herodotus and Ssu-ma Ch'ien: A Preliminary Study of Styles and Sources in Their Early Chapters On Using This Book Weights and Measures List of Abbreviations Memoir 45 Memoir 46 Memoir 47 Memoir 48 Memoir 49 Memoir 50 Memoir 51 Memoir 52 Frequently Mentioned Commentators Biographical Sketches of Shih chi Scholars Selected Recent Works on the Shih Chi Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780253355904 20180521
The 16 chapters translated herein continue the biographies of individuals in pre-Han China presented in volume seven of "The Grand Scribe's Records". The reader is introduced to the major supporters and rivals of the founders of the Han Dynasty: the generals, advisors, strategists, and ministers who helped to shape the foundations of the first sustained empire in Chinese history. Although these men were often of common stock, they influenced the development of many aspects of the Han culture, a culture which in turn served as a model for subsequent eras.Based on oral and written accounts as well as on administrative records, these biographies range stylistically from anecdotal tales to repetitious reports of achievements in battle. The failure of the first five Han emperors to trust the loyalty of their subordinates is a leitmotif in many of these chapters. But the individual motifs that echo other sections of the "Grand Scribe's Records" - unrecognized heroes, both loyal and disloyal retainers, broken friendships, and faithless lovers - also appear in these pages.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780253340283 20160528
This volume is part of the first complete translation (in nine volumes) of the "Shih chi" ("The Grand Scribe's Records"), one of the most important narratives in traditional China. Compiled by Ssu-ma Ch'ien (145-c. 86 B. C.), it draws upon most major early historical works and was the foremost model for style and genre in Chinese history and literature through the eleventh century A.D., and through the early twentieth century for some genres. Volume 1, "The Basic Annals of Pre-Han China" contains the seven pen-chi or 'basic annals' in the "Grand Scribe's Records", tracing the history of China's rulers from earliest times through the late third century B. C. Although parts of the earliest of these narratives are now seen as myth, in Ssu-ma Ch'ien's eyes each account was as close to historical truth as his sources would permit. His basic annals begin with the origins of the Chinese state and follow its evolution over several millennia, from a regional power during several early dynasties to the establishment of the first empire in the late third century B. C. under the First Emperor of Ch'in. The basic annals also provide, from the perspective of the ruling houses, the chronological foundation on which the rest of this massive history is based. The contents include: The Five Emperors, Basic Annals One; The Hsia, Basic Annals Two; The Yin, Basic Annals Three; The Chou, Basic Annals Four; The Ch'in, Basic Annals Five; The First Emperor of Ch'in, Basic Annals Six; Hsiang Yu, Basic Annals Seven; Biography; Index; and Maps.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780253340214 20160528
This volume is part of the first complete translation (in nine volumes) of the "Shih chi" ("The Grand Scribe's Records"), one of the most important narratives in traditional China. Compiled by Ssu-ma Ch'ien (145-c. 86 B.C.), it draws upon most major early historical works and was the foremost model for style and genre in Chinese history and literature through the eleventh century A. D., and through the early twentieth century for some genres. Volume 7, "The Memoirs of Pre_Han China", translates twenty-eight Lieh-chuan or 'memoirs' which depict more than a hundred men and women: sages and scholars, recluses and rhetoricians, persuaders and politicians, commandants and cutthroats of the Ch'in and earlier dynasties. Although the memoirs also begin with what is now often considered myth - an account of the renowned recluses Po Yi and Shu Ch'i - the emphasis in these texts is on the fate of various states and power centers as seen through the biographies of key individuals from the seventh to the third centuries B.C. The contents include: Po Yi, Memoir 1; Kuan Yi-wu and Yen Ying, Memoir 2; Lao Tzu and Han Fei, Memoir 3; Marshal Jang-chu, Memoir 4; Sun Tzu and Wu Ch'i, Memoir 5; Wu Tzu Hsu, Memoir 6; Confucius's Disciples, Memoir 7; The Lord of Shang, Memoir 8; Su Ch'in, Memoir 9; Chang Yi, Memoir 10; Shu-li Tzu and Kan Mao, Memoir 11; The Marquis of Jang, Memoir 12; Pai Ch'i and Wang Chien, Memoir 13; Meng Tzu and Excellency Hsun, Memoir 14; The Lord of Meng-ch'ang, Memoir 15; The lord of P'ing-yuan and Excellency Yu, Memoir 16; The Noble Scion of Wei, Memoir 17; The Lord of Ch'un-shen, Memoir 18; Fan Sui and Ts'ai Tse, Memoir 19; Yueh Yi, Memoir 20; Lien P'o and Lin Hsiang-ju, Memoir 21; T'ien Tan, Memoir 22; Lu Chung Lien and Tsou Yang, Memoir 23; Ch'u Yuan and Scholar Chia, Memoir 24; Lu Pu-wei, Memoir 25; The Assassin-Retainers, Memoir 26; Li Ssu, Memoir 27; Meng T'ien, Memoir 28; Bibliography; Index; and Maps.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780253340276 20160528
This volume of The Grand Scribe's Records includes the second segment of Han-dynasty memoirs and deals primarily with men who lived and served under Emperor Wu (r. 141-87 B.C.). The lead chapter presents a parallel biography of two ancient physicians, Pien Ch'ueh and Ts'ang Kung, providing a transition between the founding of the Han dynasty and its heyday under Wu. The account of Liu P'i is framed by the great rebellion he led in 154 B.C. and the remaining chapters trace the careers of court favorites, depict the tribulations of an ill-fated general, discuss the Han's greatest enemy, the Hsiung-nu, and provide accounts of two great generals who fought them. The final memoir is structured around memorials by two strategists who attempted to lead Emperor Wu into negotiations with the Hsiung-nu, a policy that Ssu-ma Ch'ien himself supported.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780253355904 20180521
Green Library
CHINA-209-01
Book
208 p. 94 illus., map. 23 cm.
Green Library
CHINA-209-01
Book
2 v. maps. 24 cm.
  • v. 1. Early years of the Han dynasty, 209 to 141 B.C.-- v. 2. The age of Emperor Wu, 140 to circa 100 B.C.
Green Library
CHINA-209-01