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Book
xiii, 295 pages ; 23 cm.
  • Acknowledgements Note on Abbreviated Citations Introduction: Philosophy in a Cross-Cultural Context 1. Formations of the Problem of Evil 2. The Efficacy of Human Action and the Mohist Opposition to Fate 3. Efficacy and Following Nature in the Daodejing 4. Reproaching Heaven and Serving Heaven in the Mengzi 5. Beyond the Human in the Zhuangi 6. Xunzi and the Fragility of the Human Conclusion Notes Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780253011725 20160616
That bad things happen to good people was as true in early China as it is today. Franklin Perkins uses this observation as the thread by which to trace the effort by Chinese thinkers of the Warring States Period (c.475-221 BCE), a time of great conflict and division, to seek reconciliation between humankind and the world. Perkins provides rich new readings of classical Chinese texts and reflects on their significance for Western philosophical discourse.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780253011725 20160616
Green Library
CHINA-208-01
Book
xxxi, 327 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • IntroductionOutline of Early Chinese History1. Free and Easy Wandering2. Discussion on Making All Things Equal3. The Secret of Caring for Life4. In the World of Men5. The Sign of Virtue Complete6. The Great and Venerable Teacher7. Fit for Emperors and Kings8. Webbed Toes9. Horses' Hoofs10. Rifling Trunks11. Let It Be, Leave It Alone12. Heaven and Earth13. The Way of Heaven14. The Turning of Heaven15. Constrained in Will16. Mending the Inborn Nature17. Autumn Floods18. Supreme Happiness19. Mastering Life20. The Mountain Tree21. Tian Zifang22. Knowledge Wandered North23. Gengsang Chu24. Xu Wugui25. Zeyang26. External Things27. Imputed Words28. Giving Away a Throne29. Robber Zhi30. Discoursing on Swords31. The Old Fisherman32. Lie Yukou33. The WorldIndex.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780231164740 20160612
Only by inhabiting Dao (the Way of Nature) and dwelling in its unity can humankind achieve true happiness and freedom, in both life and death. This is Daoist philosophy's central tenet, espoused by the person--or group of people--known as Zhuangzi (369?-286? B.C.E.) in a text by the same name. To be free, individuals must discard rigid distinctions between good and bad, right and wrong, and follow a course of action not motivated by gain or striving. When one ceases to judge events as good or bad, man-made suffering disappears and natural suffering is embraced as part of life. Zhuangzi elucidates this mystical philosophy through humor, parable, and anecdote, deploying non sequitur and even nonsense to illuminate a truth beyond the boundaries of ordinary logic. Boldly imaginative and inventively worded, the Zhuangzi floats free of its historical period and society, addressing the spiritual nourishment of all people across time. One of the most justly celebrated texts of the Chinese tradition, the Zhuangzi is read by thousands of English-language scholars each year, yet only in the Wade-Giles romanization. Burton Watson's pinyin romanization brings the text in line with how Chinese scholars, and an increasing number of other scholars, read it.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780231164740 20160612
Green Library
CHINA-208-01
Book
ii, 533 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm.
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Green Library
CHINA-208-01
Book
xvii, 501 pages : 23 cm.
Green Library
CHINA-208-01
Book
xvii, 271 p : ill., map ; 23 cm.
This book is an introduction in the very best sense of the word. It provides the beginner with an accurate, sophisticated, yet accessible account, and offers new insights and challenging perspectives to those who have more specialized knowledge. Focusing on the period in Chinese philosophy that is surely most easily approachable and perhaps is most important, it ranges over of rich set of competing options. It also, with admirable self-consciousness, presents a number of daring attempts to relate those options to philosophical figures and movements from the West. I recommend it very highly. --Lee H. Yearley, Walter Y. Evans-Wentz Professor, Religious Studies, Stanford University --- A substantial and highly accessible introduction to the indigenous philosophies of China. Van Norden shares his clear distillations of classical Chinese philosophies using conceptual frameworks many will find familiar. This reader-friendly book sets the historical and cultural contexts for the philosophies discussed, and includes appendices, study questions, and imaginative scenarios, which aid us in appreciating some of the most important philosophy ever developed. --Ann Pirruccello, Professor of Philosophy, University of San Diego --- This lucid introduction to early Chinese thought offers historical, textual and conceptual analyses of the schools of Classical Chinese philosophy, illuminating their basic themes, theories, and arguments and providing readers with an intellectual bridge between Chinese and Western thought. Introductory texts such as this are especially needed today, as the study of philosophy faces the challenges of globalization and the urgent need for dialogue among different philosophical traditions. --- An ideal text for introductory courses, this book will also inspire graduate students, scholars and experts in philosophy in general, and Chinese Philosophy in particular, with its theoretical insights and comparative methodology. --Vincent Shen, Lee Chair in Chinese Thought and Culture, Departments of Philosophy and East Asian Studies, University of Toronto.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781603844697 20160605
Green Library
CHINA-208-01
Book
lxxxv, 944 p. ; 24 cm.
"The Mozi" is one of the small number of key texts surviving from the first flowering of Chinese philosophy during the Warring States period (403-221 BC). In structure, "The Mozi" comprises five distinct parts. Part I, the Epitomes, contains seven short essays on elements of Mohist doctrine. Part II, the 'Core Doctrines', contains twenty-four chapters: twenty-three from the presumed thirty original chapters, arranged as ten triads, which set out the ten central doctrines of Mo Zi's ethical, social and political philosophy, and one of the two presumed chapters articulating Mo Zi's opposition to Confucianism. Part III, on 'dialectics', contains six chapters on logic, language, disputation, ethics, science and other matters, attributed to the Later Mohists and written, in part at least, in defence of the original Mohist doctrines. Part IV, the Dialogues, contains five chapters made up of lively conversations, edifying anecdotes and gnomic utterances, a form more characteristic of the philosophical writing of the time. Part V, on the defence of a city, contains eleven chapters detailing the principles and practices of defensive warfare, a subject on which Master Mo was acknowledged as the leading authority of the time. "The Mozi" is, then, a rich and varied work, and yet it has been sadly neglected, both in China and the West. This is the first English translation of the complete work and the first bilingual version in any European language.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789629962708 20160604
The Mozi is a key philosophical work written by a major social and political thinker of the fifth century B.C.E. It is one of the few texts to survive the Warring States period (403-221 B.C.E.) and is crucial to understanding the origins of Chinese philosophy and two other foundational works, the Mengzi and the Xunzi. Ian Johnston provides an English translation of the entire Mozi, as well as the first bilingual edition in any European language to be published in the West. His careful translation reasserts the significance of the text's central doctrines, and his annotations and contextual explanations add vivid historical and interpretive dimensions. Part 1 of the Mozi is called the "Epitomes" and contains seven short essays on the elements of Mohist doctrine. Part 2, the "Core Doctrines, " establishes the ten central tenets of Mo Zi's ethical, social, and political philosophy, while articulating his opposition to Confucianism. Part 3, the "Canons and Explanations, " comprises observations on logic, language, disputation, ethics, science, and other matters, written particularly in defense of Mohism. Part 4, the "Dialogues, " presents lively conversations between Master Mo and various disciples, philosophical opponents, and potential patrons. Part 5, the "Defense Chapters, " details the principles and practices of defensive warfare, a subject on which Master Mo was an acknowledged authority. Now available to English-speaking readers of all backgrounds, the Mozi is a rich and varied text, and this bilingual edition provides an excellent tool for learning classical Chinese.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780231152402 20160604
Green Library
CHINA-208-01
Book
xviii, 238 p. ; 23 cm.
This volume is a translation of over two-thirds of the classic Daoist text "Zhuangzi" (Chuang Tzu), including the complete inner chapters and extensive selections from the outer and miscellaneous chapters, plus judicious selections from 2000 years of traditional Chinese commentaries, which provide the reader access to the text as well as to its reception and interpretation. Brief biographies of the commentators, a bibliography, a glossary, and an index are also included.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780872209121 20160527
Green Library
CHINA-208-01
Book
liv, 207 p. ; 22 cm.
Bryan Van Norden's new translation of the Mengzi (Mencius) is accurate, philosophically nuanced, and fluent. Accompanied by selected passages from the classic commentary of Zhu Xi - one of the most influential and insightful interpreters of Confucianism - this edition provides readers with a parallel to the Chinese practice of reading a classic text alongside traditional commentaries. Also included are an Introduction that situates Mengzi and Zhu Xi in their intellectual and social contexts; a glossary of names, places and important terms; a selected bibliography; and an index.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780872209145 20160527
Green Library
CHINA-208-01
Book
7, 7, 3, 230 p. ; 21 cm.
Green Library
CHINA-208-01

10. Mencius [2004]

Book
xlviii, 246 p. ; 20 cm.
Mencius was one of the great philosophers of ancient China, second only in influence to Confucius, whose teachings he defended and expanded. The Mencius, in which he recounts his dialogues with kings, dukes and military men, as well as other philosophers, is one of the Four Books that make up the essential Confucian corpus. It takes up Confucius's theories of jen, or goodness and yi, righteousness, explaining that the individual can achieve harmony with mankind and the universe by perfecting his innate moral nature and acting with benevolence and justice. Mencius' strikingly modern views on the duties of subjects and their rulers or the evils of war, created a Confucian orthodoxy that has remained intact since the third century BCE.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780140449716 20160528
Green Library
CHINA-208-01
Book
xviii, 500 p. ; 25 cm.
This work deals with the origin and formation of Xun Zi's political thought, with focus on the intellectual activity of the Jixia Academy and its impact on this synthesizer's theory on rituals and social norms. It also deals with the problems of textual authenticity and biography.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789004129658 20160528
Green Library
CHINA-208-01
Book
xvi, 182 p. ; 23 cm.
This volume is a study of an ancient Chinese text called "the Xunzi", attributed to and named after Xun Kuang, or Xunzi (ca. 310-210 B.C.). It is divided into four chapters, covering: self-cultivation and the mind; heaven; ritual and music; and language and the way.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812694000 20160528
Green Library
CHINA-208-01
Book
xiv, 192 p. ; 24 cm.
While China has a long tradition of lexicography and of phonological studies, there is, unlike in Europe and India, no tradition of descriptive or prescriptive grammar. "Outline of Classical Chinese Grammar" fills this gap and is the first comprehensive introduction to syntactical analysis of classical Chinese. The book focuses on the language of the high classical period, approximately from the time of Confucius to the unification of the empire by Qin and Han at the end of the third century "bc", and pays particular attention to the Mencius, the Lunyu, and, to a lesser extent, the Zuozhuan texts, which are of central importance not only in themselves but also as models for later writers. "Outline of Classical Chinese Grammar" starts with a brief historical overview and a discussion of the relation between the writing system and the phonology. This is followed by a short section outlining overall rpicnciples of word order and sentence structure. The next sections deal with the main sentence types - nominal predicates, verbal predicates, and numerical expressions, which constitute a special type of quasiverbal predication. The final sections cover topics such as subordinate constituents of sentences, nondeclarative sentence types and complex sentences. Examples, which are given in pinyin romanization as well as in Chinese characters and with English translations, are numbered consecutively throughout the text for ease of cross-reference. An index and a glossary of technical linguistic terminology complete the text.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780774805056 20160528
Outline of Classical Chinese Grammar is a comprehensive introduction to the syntactical analysis of classical Chinese. Focusing on the language of the high classical period, which ranges from the time of Confucius to the unification of the empire by Qin in 221, the book pays particular attention to the Mencius, the Lunyu, and, to a lesser extent, the Zuozhuan texts.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780774805414 20160528
Green Library
CHINA-208-01
Book
x, 502 p. ; 24 cm.
This history of the Classical period (500-200 BCE) presents a vision of this subject and acts as an introduction for the non-scholar, a comprehensive history for the student, and brimming with bold new insights for the specialist. "Disputers of the Tao" focuses on the dialogues between rival thinkers, tracing the increasing sophistication of argument which developed with growing competition among the schools. The book is equally as concerned with how these philosophers thought as it is with what they thought. Chinese philosophy has unique features, but it has very much to do with what Westerners understand by rationality. Professor Graham identifies the rationalistic and anti-rationalistic trends which culminated in the Later Mohists and the Taoist Chuang-tzu. He presents a full account of Later Mohist proto-logic, explores the nature of Chinese science, and examines the relation between Yin-Yang speculation and the proto-scientific speculation of medieval and Renaissance Europe. Professor Graham analyzes the underlying conceptual differences between Chinese and Western thought, some of them rooted in differences between Chinese and Indo-European languages - affecting, for example, the categories and the concept of Being. Chinese thought raises fundamental questions about the posing of the fact-value issue and the relation between analytic and correlative thinking. Throughout, there are ample quotations from the ancient texts, in new translations which take advantage of recent advances in Chinese linguistics and hermeneutics.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812690873 20160527
Green Library, Philosophy Library (Tanner)
CHINA-208-01
Book
3 volumes ; 24 cm
  • V. 1. Books 1-6
  • v. 2. Books 7-16
  • v. 3. Books 17-32.
Green Library, Philosophy Library (Tanner), SAL3 (off-campus storage)
CHINA-208-01
Book
29 p. ; 23 cm.
Green Library
CHINA-208-01
Book
xv, 590 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
The Canons and other later writings of the school of Mo-tzu, dating from about 300 B.C., contain nearly all that survives of the logic of ancient China, and its optics and mechanics, the only organized set of geometrical definitions, and the only fully rationalized system of ethics. They represent the high point of abstract rationality in traditional Chinese civilization, and are crucial documents for any inquiry into its achievements and limitations in logic and science. Unfortunately their formidable textual difficulties have hitherto made it impossible to use them with any confidence, and English translations of Mo-tzu, have omitted them. Western sinologists have generally ignored this rich material with the result that they have been forced to draw their conclusions about Chinese logic from the almost negligible remains of the Sophists. The present work begins with a general account of the school of Mo-tzu, its social basis as a movement of craftsmen, its isolated place in the Chinese tradition, and the nature of its later contributions to logic, ethics and science. The relation of Mohist thinking to the structure of the Chinese language is also discussed. The textual problems of the later writings, the grammar and style, the technical terminology, the significance of stock examples, and the overall organization of the documents, are then explored in detail. With the investigation of these preliminary questions, the possibilities of interpretation are confined within controllable limits. The edited and annotated Chinese text follows, with an English translation and commentary, a glossary, and a photographic reproduction of the unemended text from the Taoist Patrology.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789622011427 20160528
Green Library
CHINA-208-01
Book
xviii, 261 p. 24 cm.
Green Library
CHINA-208-01
Book
vi, 140 p. ; 21 cm.
Green Library, Philosophy Library (Tanner)
CHINA-208-01
Book
v. 20 cm.
Green Library, Philosophy Library (Tanner)
CHINA-208-01