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xxvii, 1022 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 29 cm
  • UNIT I: THE FOUNDATIONS OF MICROBIOLOGY 1. The Microbial World 2. Microbial Cell Structure and Function 3. Microbial Metabolism 4. Molecular Information Flow and Protein Processing UNIT II: MICROBIAL GROWTH AND REGULATION 5. Microbial Growth and Its Control 6. Microbial Regulatory Systems 7. Molecular Biology of Microbial Growth 8. Viruses and Their Replication UNIT III: GENOMICS AND GENETICS 9. Microbial Systems Biology 10. Viral Genomics 11. Genetics of Bacteria and Archaea 12. Biotechnology and Synthetic Biology UNIT IV: MICROBIAL EVOLUTION AND DIVERSITY 13. Microbial Evolution and Systematics 14. Metabolic Diversity of Microorganisms 15. Functional Diversity of Microorganisms 16. Diversity of Bacteria 17. Diversity of Archaea 18. Diversity of Microbial Eukarya UNIT V: MICROBIAL ECOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY 19. Taking the Measure of Microbial Systems 20. Microbial Ecosystems 21. Nutrient Cycles in Nature 22. Microbiology of the Built Environment 23. Microbial Symbioses with Microbes, Plants, and Animals UNIT VI: MICROBE-HUMAN INTERACTIONS AND THE IMMUNE SYSTEM 24. Microbial Symbioses with Humans 25. Microbial Infection and Pathogenesis 26. Innate Immunity: Broadly Specific Host Defenses 27. Adaptive Immunity: Highly Specific Host Defenses 28. Clinical Microbiology and Immunology UNIT VII INFECTIOUS DISEASES AND THEIR TRANSMISSION 29. Epidemiology 30. Person-to-Person Bacterial and Viral Diseases 31. Vectorborne and Soilborne Bacterial and Viral Diseases 32. Foodborne and Waterborne Bacterial and Viral Diseases 33. Eukaryotic Pathogens: Fungi, Protozoa, and Helminths.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780134261928 20171121
  • Machine generated contents note: UNIT 1 Foundations of Microbiology
  • 1. Microbial World
  • Microbiologynow Microorganisms, Our Constant Companions
  • I. Exploring the Microbial World
  • 1.1. Microorganisms, Tiny Titans of the Earth
  • 1.2. Structure and Activities of Microbial Cells
  • 1.3. Microorganisms and the Biosphere
  • 1.4. Impact of Microorganisms on Human Society
  • II. Microscopy and the Origins of Microbiology
  • 1.5. Light Microscopy and the Discovery of Microorganisms
  • 1.6. Improving Contrast in Light Microscopy
  • 1.7. Imaging Cells in Three Dimensions
  • 1.8. Probing Cell Structure: Electron Microscopy
  • III. Microbial Cultivation Expands the Horizon of Microbiology
  • 1.9. Pasteur and Spontaneous Generation
  • 1.10. Koch, Infectious Diseases, and Pure Cultures
  • 1.11. Discovery of Microbial Diversity
  • IV. Molecular Biology and the Unity and Diversity of Life
  • 1.12. Molecular Basis of Life
  • 1.13. Woese and the Tree of Life
  • 1.14. Introduction to Microbial Life
  • 2. Microbial Cell Structure and Function
  • Microbiologynow The Archaellum: Motility for the Archaea
  • I. Cells of Bacteria and Archaea
  • 2.1. Cell Morphology
  • 2.2. Small World
  • II. Cell Membrane and Wall
  • 2.3. Cytoplasmic Membrane
  • 2.4. Bacterial Cell Walls: Peptidoglycan
  • 2.5. LPS: The Outer Membrane
  • 2.6. Archaeal Cell Walls
  • III. Cell Surface Structures and Inclusions
  • 2.7. Cell Surface Structures
  • 2.8. Cell Inclusions
  • 2.9. Gas Vesicles
  • 2.10. Endospores
  • IV. Cell Locomotion
  • 2.11. Flagella, Archaella, and Swimming Motility
  • 2.12. Gliding Motility
  • 2.13. Chemotaxis and Other Taxes
  • V. Eukaryotic Microbial Cells
  • 2.14. Nucleus and Cell Division
  • 2.15. Mitochondria, Hydrogenosomes, and Chloroplasts
  • 2.16. Other Eukaryotic Cell Structures
  • Explore The Microbial World Tiny Cells
  • 3. Microbial Metabolism
  • Microbiologynow Sugars and Sweets: Archaea Do It Their Way
  • I. Microbial Nutrients and Nutrient Uptake
  • 3.1. Feeding the Microbe: Cell Nutrition
  • 3.2. Transporting Nutrients into the Cell
  • II. Energetics, Enzymes, and Redox
  • 3.3. Energy Classes of Microorganisms
  • 3.4. Principles of Bioenergetics
  • 3.5. Catalysis and Enzymes
  • 3.6. Electron Donors and Acceptors
  • 3.7. Energy-Rich Compounds
  • III. Catabolism: Fermentation and Respiration
  • 3.8. Glycolysis and Fermentation
  • 3.9. Respiration: Citric Acid and Glyoxylate Cycles
  • 3.10. Respiration: Electron Carriers
  • 3.11. Electron Transport and the Proton Motive Force
  • 3.12. Options for Energy Conservation
  • IV. Biosyntheses
  • 3.13. Sugars and Polysaccharides
  • 3.14. Amino Acids and Nucleotides
  • 3.15. Fatty Acids and Lipids
  • 4. Molecular Information Flow and Protein Processing
  • Microbiologynow Synthesis of Jumbo Proteins: Secretion of Halomucin
  • I. Molecular Biology and Genetic Elements
  • 4.1. DNA and Genetic Information Flow
  • 4.2. Genetic Elements: Chromosomes and Plasmids
  • II. Copying the Genetic Blueprint: DNA Replication
  • 4.3. Templates, Enzymes, and the Replication Fork
  • 4.4. Bidirectional Replication, the Replisome, and Proofreading
  • III. RNA Synthesis: Transcription
  • 4.5. Transcription in Bacteria
  • 4.6. Transcription in Archaea and Eukarya
  • IV. Protein Synthesis: Translation
  • 4.7. Amino Acids, Polypeptides, and Proteins
  • 4.8. Transfer RNA
  • 4.9. Translation and the Genetic Code
  • 4.10. Mechanism of Protein Synthesis
  • V. Protein Processing, Secretion, and Targeting
  • 4.11. Assisted Protein Folding and Chaperones
  • 4.12. Protein Secretion: The Sec and Tat Systems
  • 4.13. Protein Secretion: Gram-Negative Systems
  • UNIT 2 Microbial Growth and Regulation
  • 5. Microbial Growth and Its Control
  • Microbiologynow Picking Apart a Microbial Consortium
  • I. Cell Division and Population Growth
  • 5.1. Binary Fission, Budding, and Biofilms
  • 5.2. Quantitative Aspects of Microbial Growth
  • 5.3. Microbial Growth Cycle
  • 5.4. Continuous Culture
  • II. Culturing Microbes and Measuring Their Growth
  • 5.5. Growth Media and Laboratory Culture
  • 5.6. Microscopic Counts of Microbial Cell Numbers
  • 5.7. Viable Counting of Microbial Cell Numbers
  • 5.8. Turbidimetric Measures of Microbial Cell Numbers
  • III. Environmental Effects on Growth: Temperature
  • 5.9. Temperature Classes of Microorganisms
  • 5.10. Microbial Life in the Cold
  • 5.11. Microbial Life at High Temperatures
  • IV. Environmental Effects on Growth: pH, Osmolarity, and Oxygen
  • 5.12. Effects of pH on Microbial Growth
  • 5.13. Osmolarity and Microbial Growth
  • 5.14. Oxygen and Microbial Growth
  • V. Controlling Microbial Growth
  • 5.15. General Principles and Growth Control by Heat
  • 5.16. Other Physical Control Methods: Radiation and Filtration
  • 5.17. Chemical Control of Microbial Growth
  • 6. Microbial Regulatory Systems
  • Microbiologynow Microbial Hunter: Pseudomonas aeruginosa Senses and Scavenges Nutrients from Damaged Tissues
  • I. DNA-Binding Proteins and Transcriptional Regulation
  • 6.1. DNA-Binding Proteins
  • 6.2. Negative Control: Repression and Induction
  • 6.3. Positive Control: Activation
  • 6.4. Global Control and the lac Operon
  • 6.5. Transcription Controls in Archaea
  • II. Sensing and Signal Transduction
  • 6.6. Two-Component Regulatory Systems
  • 6.7. Regulation of Chemotaxis
  • 6.8. Quorum Sensing
  • 6.9. Stringent Response
  • 6.10. Other Global Networks
  • III. RNA-Based Regulation
  • 6.11. Regulatory RNAs
  • 6.12. Riboswitches
  • 6.13. Attenuation
  • IV. Regulation of Enzymes and Other Proteins
  • 6.14. Feedback Inhibition
  • 6.15. Post-Translational Regulation
  • 7. Molecular Biology of Microbial Growth
  • Microbiologynow Explosive Cell Death Promotes Biofilm Formation
  • I. Bacterial Cell Division
  • 7.1. Visualizing Molecular Growth
  • 7.2. Chromosome Replication and Segregation
  • 7.3. Cell Division and Fts Proteins
  • 7.4. MreB and Cell Morphology
  • 7.5. Peptidoglycan Biosynthesis
  • II. Regulation of Development in Model Bacteria
  • 7.6. Regulation of Endospore Formation
  • 7.7. Caulobacter Differentiation
  • 7.8. Heterocyst Formation in Anabaena
  • 7.9. Biofilm Formation
  • III. Antibiotics and Microbial Growth
  • 7.10. Antibiotic Targets and Antibiotic Resistance
  • 7.11. Persistence and Dormancy
  • 8. Viruses and Their Replication
  • Microbiologynow Virophages: Viruses That Parasitize Other Viruses
  • I. Nature of Viruses
  • 8.1. What Is a Virus-- 8.2. Structure of the Virion
  • 8.3. Overview of the Virus Life Cycle
  • 8.4. Culturing, Detecting, and Counting Viruses
  • II. Viral Replication Cycle
  • 8.5. Attachment and Entry of Bacteriophage T4
  • 8.6. Replication of Bacteriophage T4
  • 8.7. Temperate Bacteriophages and Lysogeny
  • 8.8. Overview of Animal Virus Infection
  • UNIT 3 Genomics and Genetics
  • 9. Microbial Systems Biology
  • Microbiologynow DNA Sequencing in the Palm of Your Hand
  • I. Genomics
  • 9.1. Introduction to Genomics
  • 9.2. Sequencing and Annotating Genomes
  • 9.3. Genome Size and Gene Content in Bacteria and Archaea
  • 9.4. Organelle and Eukaryotic Microbial Genomes
  • II. Evolution of Genomes
  • 9.5. Gene Families, Duplications, and Deletions
  • 9.6. Horizontal Gene Transfer and the Mobilome
  • 9.7. Core Genome Versus Pan Genome
  • III. Functional Omics
  • 9.8. Metagenomics
  • 9.9. Gene Chips and Transcriptomics
  • 9.10. Proteomics and the Interactome
  • 9.11. Metabolomics
  • IV. Utility of Systems Biology
  • 9.12. Single-Cell Genomics
  • 9.13. Integrating Mycobacterium tuberculosis Omics
  • 9.14. Systems Biology and Human Health
  • 10. Viral Genomics, Diversity, and Ecology
  • Microbiologynow Viral Imaging to the Rescue: Structural Blueprint of Zika
  • I. Viral Genomes and Evolution
  • 10.1. Size and Structure of Viral Genomes
  • 10.2. Viral Evolution
  • II. DNA Viruses
  • 10.3. Single-Stranded DNA Bacteriophages: φ[×]174 and M13
  • 10.4. Double-Stranded DNA Bacteriophages: T7 and Mu
  • 10.5. Viruses of Archaea
  • 10.6. Uniquely Replicating DNA Animal Viruses
  • 10.7. DNA Tumor Viruses
  • III. Viruses with RNA Genomes
  • 10.8. Positive-Strand RNA Viruses
  • 10.9. Negative-Strand RNA Animal Viruses
  • 10.10. Double-Stranded RNA Viruses
  • 10.11. Viruses That Use Reverse Transcriptase
  • IV. Viral Ecology
  • 10.12. Bacterial and Archael Virosphere
  • 10.13. Viral Defense Mechanisms of Bacteria and Archaea
  • 10.14. Human Virome
  • V. Subviral Agents
  • 10.15. Viroids
  • 10.16. Prions
  • 11. Genetics of Bacteria and Archaea
  • Microbiologynow Killing and Stealing: DNA Uptake by the Predator Vibrio cholerae
  • I. Mutation
  • 11.1. Mutations and Mutants
  • 11.2. Molecular Basis of Mutation
  • 11.3. Reversions and Mutation Rates
  • 11.4. Mutagenesis
  • II. Gene Transfer in Bacteria
  • 11.5. Genetic Recombination
  • 11.6. Transformation
  • 11.7. Transduction
  • 11.8. Conjugation
  • 11.9. Formation of Hfr Strains and Chromosome Mobilization
  • III. Gene Transfer in Archaea and Other Genetic Events
  • 11.10. Horizontal Gene Transfer in Archaea
  • 11.11. Mobile DNA: Transposable Elements
  • 11.12. Preserving Genomic Integrity: CRISPR Interference
  • 12. Biotechnology and Synthetic Biology
  • Microbiologynow Creation of a New Life Form: Design of a Minimal Cell
  • I. Tools of the Genetic Engineer
  • 12.1. Manipulating DNA: PCR and Nucleic Acid Hybridization --
  • Contents note continued: 22.3. Bioremediation of Uranium-Contaminated Environments
  • 22.4. Bioremediation of Organic Pollutants: Hydrocarbons
  • 22.5. Bioremediation of Organic Pollutants: Pesticides and Plastics
  • III. Wastewater and Drinking Water Treatment
  • 22.6. Primary and Secondary Wastewater Treatment
  • 22.7. Advanced Wastewater Treatment
  • 22.8. Drinking Water Purification and Stabilization
  • 22.9. Water Distribution Systems
  • IV. Indoor Microbiology and Microbially Influenced Corrosion
  • 22.10. Microbiology of Homes and Public Spaces
  • 22.11. Microbially Influenced Corrosion of Metals
  • 22.12. Biodeterioration of Stone and Concrete
  • 23. Microbial Symbioses with Microbes, Plants, and Animals
  • Microbiologynow The Inner Life of Bees
  • I. Symbioses between Microorganisms
  • 23.1. Lichens
  • 23.2. "Chlorochromatium aggregatum"
  • II. Plants as Microbial Habitats
  • 23.3. Legume--Root Nodule Symbiosis
  • 23.4. Mycorrhizae
  • 23.5. Agrobacterium and Crown Gall Disease
  • III. Insects as Microbial Habitats
  • 23.6. Heritable Symbionts of Insects
  • 23.7. Termites
  • IV. Other Invertebrates as Microbial Habitats
  • 23.8. Hawaiian Bobtail Squid
  • 23.9. Marine Invertebrates at Hydrothermal Vents and Cold Seeps
  • 23.10. Entomopathogenic Nematodes
  • 23.11. Reef-Building Corals
  • V. Mammalian Gut Systems as Microbial Habitats
  • 23.12. Alternative Mammalian Gut Systems
  • 23.13. Rumen and Ruminant Animals
  • Explore The Microbial World The Multiple Microbial Symbionts of Fungus-Cultivating Ants
  • UNIT 6 Microbe--Human Interactions and the Immune System
  • 24. Microbial Symbioses with Humans
  • Microbiologynow Frozen in Time: The Iceman Microbiome
  • I. Structure and Function of the Healthy Adult Human Microbiome
  • 24.1. Overview of the Human Microbiome
  • 24.2. Gastrointestinal Microbiota
  • 24.3. Oral Cavity and Airways
  • 24.4. Urogenital Tracts and Their Microbes
  • 24.5. Skin and Its Microbes
  • II. From Birth to Death: Development of the Human Microbiome
  • 24.6. Human Study Groups and Animal Models
  • 24.7. Colonization, Succession, and Stability of the Gut Microbiota
  • III. Disorders Attributed to the Human Microbiome
  • 24.8. Disorders Attributed to the Gut Microbiota
  • 24.9. Disorders Attributed to the Oral, Skin, and Vaginal Microbiota
  • IV. Modulation of the Human Microbiome
  • 24.10. Antibiotics and the Human Microbiome
  • 24.11. Probiotics and Prebiotics
  • Explore The Microbial World The Gut--Brain Axis
  • 25. Microbial Infection and Pathogenesis
  • Microbiologynow The Microbial Community That Thrives on Your Teeth
  • I. Human--Microbial Interactions
  • 25.1. Microbial Adherence
  • 25.2. Colonization and Invasion
  • 25.3. Pathogenicity, Virulence, and Attenuation
  • 25.4. Genetics of Virulence and the Compromised Host
  • II. Enzymes and Toxins of Pathogenesis
  • 25.5. Enzymes as Virulence Factors
  • 25.6. AB-Type Exotoxins
  • 25.7. Cytolytic and Superantigen Exotoxins
  • 25.8. Endotoxins
  • 26. Innate Immunity: Broadly Specific Host Defenses
  • Microbiologynow Rehabilitating a Much-Maligned Peptide: Amyloid-β
  • I. Fundamentals of Host Defense
  • 26.1. Basic Properties of the Immune System
  • 26.2. Barriers to Pathogen Invasion
  • II. Cells and Organs of the Immune System
  • 26.3. Blood and Lymphatic Systems
  • 26.4. Leukocyte Production and Diversity
  • III. Phagocyte Response Mechanisms
  • 26.5. Pathogen Challenge and Phagocyte Recruitment
  • 26.6. Pathogen Recognition and Phagocyte Signal Transduction
  • 26.7. Phagocytosis and Phagocyte Inhibition
  • IV. Other Innate Host Defenses
  • 26.8. Inflammation and Fever
  • 26.9. Complement System
  • 26.10. Innate Defenses against Viruses
  • Explore The Microbial World Drosophila Toll Receptors---An Ancient Response to Infections
  • 27. Adaptive Immunity: Highly Specific Host Defenses
  • Microbiologynow Got (Raw) MilkThe Role of Unprocessed Cow's Milk in Protecting against Allergy and Asthma
  • I. Principles of Adaptive Immunity
  • 27.1. Specificity, Memory, Selection Processes, and Tolerance
  • 27.2. Immunogens and Classes of Immunity
  • II. Antibodies
  • 27.3. Antibody Production and Structural Diversity
  • 27.4. Antigen Binding and the Genetics of Antibody Diversity
  • III. Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC)
  • 27.5. MHC Proteins and Their Functions
  • 27.6. MHC Polymorphism, Polygeny, and Peptide Binding
  • IV. T Cells and Their Receptors
  • 27.7. T Cell Receptors: Proteins, Genes, and Diversity
  • 27.8. T Cell Diversity
  • V. Immune Disorders and Deficiencies
  • 27.9. Allergy, Hypersensitivity, and Autoimmunity
  • 27.10. Superantigens and Immunodeficiency
  • 28. Clinical Microbiology and Immunology
  • Microbiologynow Bacteriophages: Tiny Allies in the Fight against Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria
  • I. Clinical Microbiology Setting
  • 28.1. Safety in the Microbiology Laboratory
  • 28.2. Healthcare-Associated Infections
  • II. Isolating and Characterizing Infectious Microorganisms
  • 28.3. Workflow in the Clinical Laboratory
  • 28.4. Choosing the Right Treatment
  • III. Immunological and Molecular Tools for Disease Diagnosis
  • 28.5. Immunoassays and Disease
  • 28.6. Precipitation, Agglutination, and Immunofluorescence
  • 28.7. Enzyme Immunoassays, Rapid Tests, and Immunoblots
  • 28.8. Nucleic Acid--Based Clinical Assays
  • IV. Prevention and Treatment of Infectious Diseases
  • 28.9. Vaccination
  • 28.10. Antibacterial Drugs
  • 28.11. Antimicrobial Drugs That Target Nonbacterial Pathogens
  • 28.12. Antimicrobial Drug Resistance and New Treatment Strategies
  • Explore The Microbial World MRSA---A Formidable Clinical Challenge
  • UNIT 7 Infectious Diseases and Their Transmission
  • 29. Epidemiology
  • Microbiologynow A Mysterious New Disease Outbreak
  • I. Principles of Epidemiology
  • 29.1. Language of Epidemiology
  • 29.2. Host Community
  • 29.3. Infectious Disease Transmission and Reservoirs
  • 29.4. Characteristics of Disease Epidemics
  • II. Epidemiology and Public Health
  • 29.5. Public Health and Infectious Disease
  • 29.6. Global Health Comparisons
  • III. Emerging Infectious Diseases, Pandemics, and Other Threats
  • 29.7. Emerging and Reemerging Infectious Diseases
  • 29.8. Examples of Pandemics: HIV/AIDS, Cholera, and Influenza
  • 29.9. Public Health Threats from Microbial Weapons
  • Explore The Microbial World Textbook Epidemiology: The SARS Epidemic
  • 30. Person-to-Person Bacterial and Viral Diseases
  • Microbiologynow A New Weapon against AIDS-- I. Airborne Bacterial Diseases
  • 30.1. Airborne Pathogens
  • 30.2. Streptococcal Syndromes
  • 30.3. Diphtheria and Pertussis
  • 30.4. Tuberculosis and Leprosy
  • 30.5. Meningitis and Meningococcemia
  • II. Airborne Viral Diseases
  • 30.6. MMR and Varicella-Zoster Infections
  • 30.7. Common Cold
  • 30.8. Influenza
  • III. Direct-Contact Bacterial and Viral Diseases
  • 30.9. Staphylococcus aureus Infections
  • 30.10. Helicobacter pylori and Gastric Diseases
  • 30.11. Hepatitis
  • 30.12. Ebola: A Deadly Threat
  • IV. Sexually Transmitted Infections
  • 30.13. Gonorrhea and Syphilis
  • 30.14. Chlamydia, Herpes, and Human Papillomavirus
  • 30.15. HIV/AIDS
  • 31. Vectorborne and Soilborne Bacterial and Viral Diseases
  • Microbiologynow A New Look at Rabies Vaccines
  • I. Animal-Transmitted Viral Diseases
  • 31.1. Rabies Virus and Rabies
  • 31.2. Hantavirus and Hantavirus Syndromes
  • II. Arthropod-Transmitted Bacterial and Viral Diseases
  • 31.3. Rickettsial Diseases
  • 31.4. Lyme Disease and Borrelia
  • 31.5. Yellow Fever, Dengue Fever, Chikungunya, and Zika
  • 31.6. West Nile Fever
  • 31.7. Plague
  • III. Soilborne Bacterial Diseases
  • 31.8. Anthrax
  • 31.9. Tetanus and Gas Gangrene
  • 32. Waterborne and Foodborne Bacterial and Viral Diseases
  • Microbiologynow The Classic Botulism Scenario
  • I. Water as a Disease Vehicle
  • 32.1. Agents and Sources of Waterborne Diseases
  • 32.2. Public Health and Water Quality
  • II. Waterborne Diseases
  • 32.3. Vibrio cholerae and Cholera
  • 32.4. Legionellosis
  • 32.5. Typhoid Fever and Norovirus Illness
  • III. Food as a Disease Vehicle
  • 32.6. Food Spoilage and Food Preservation
  • 32.7. Foodborne Disease and Food Epidemiology
  • IV. Food Poisoning
  • 32.8. Staphylococcal Food Poisoning
  • 32.9. Clostridial Food Poisoning
  • V. Food Infection
  • 32.10. Salmonellosis
  • 32.11. Pathogenic Escherichia coli
  • 32.12. Campylobacter
  • 32.13. Listeriosis
  • 32.14. Other Foodborne Infectious Diseases
  • 33. Eukaryotic Pathogens: Fungi, Protozoa, and Helminths
  • Microbiologynow Environmental Change and Parasitic Diseases in the Amazon
  • I. Fungal Infections
  • 33.1. Pathogenic Fungi and Classes of Infection
  • 33.2. Fungal Diseases: Mycoses
  • II. Visceral Parasitic Infections
  • 33.3. Amoebae and Ciliates: Entamoeba, Naegleria, and Balantidium
  • 33.4. Other Visceral Parasites: Giardia, Trichomonas, Cryptosporidium, Toxoplasma, and Cyclospora
  • III. Blood and Tissue Parasitic Infections
  • 33.5. Plasmodium and Malaria
  • 33.6. Leishmaniasis, Trypanosomiasis, and Chagas Disease
  • 33.7. Parasitic Helminths: Schistosomiasis and Filariases.
For courses in General Microbiology. A streamlined approach to master microbiologyBrock Biology of Microorganisms is the leading majors microbiology text on the market. It sets the standard for impeccable scholarship, accuracy, and strong coverage of ecology, evolution, and metabolism. The 15th edition seamlessly integrates the most current science, paying particular attention to molecular biology and the genomic revolution. It introduces a flexible, more streamlined organization with a consistent level of detail and comprehensive art program. Brock Biology of Microorganisms helps students quickly master concepts, both in and outside the classroom, through personalized learning, engaging activities to improve problem solving skills, and superior art and animations with Mastering (TM) Microbiology. Also available with Mastering Microbiology.Mastering (TM) Microbiology is an online homework, tutorial, and assessment product designed to improve results by helping students quickly master concepts. Students benefit from self-paced tutorials that feature personalized wrong-answer feedback and hints that emulate the office-hour experience and help keep students on track. With a wide range of interactive, engaging, and assignable activities, students are encouraged to actively learn and retain tough course concepts.Students, if interested in purchasing this title with Mastering Microbiology, ask your instructor for the correct package ISBN and Course ID. Instructors, contact your Pearson representative for more information. Note: You are purchasing a standalone product; Mastering (TM) Microbiology does not come packaged with this content. Students, if interested in purchasing this title with Mastering Microbiology, ask your instructor for the correct package ISBN and Course ID. Instructors, contact your Pearson representative for more information. If you would like to purchase both the physical text and Mastering Microbiology, search for: 0134268660 / 9780134268668 Brock Biology of Microorganisms Plus Mastering Microbiology with eText -- Access Card Package, 15/e Package consists of:0134261925 / 9780134261928 Brock Biology of Microorganisms0134603974 / 9780134603971 Mastering Microbiology with Pearson eText -- Standalone Access Card -- for Brock Biology of Microorganisms, 15/e MasteringMicrobiology should only be purchased when required by an instructor.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780134261928 20171121
Science Library (Li and Ma)
BIO-62-01, CHEMENG-355-01
Book
xxiv, 1006 pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 29 cm
  • I. THE FOUNDATIONS OF MICROBIOLOGY 1. Microorganisms and Microbiology 2. Microbial Cell Structure and Function 3. Nutrition, Culture, and Metabolism 4. Molecular Microbiology 5. Microbial Growth and Growth Control II. GENOMICS, GENETICS, AND VIROLOGY 6. Microbial Genomics 7. Metabolic Regulation 8. Genetics of Bacteria and Archaea 9. Viruses and Virology 10. Genomics and Phylogeny of Viruses 11. Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology III. METABOLIC AND MICROBIAL DIVERSITY 12. Metabolic Diversity of Bacteria and Archaea 13. Microbial Evolution and Systematics 14. Phylogenetic Diversity of Bacteria 15. Functional and Ecological Diversity of Bacteria 16. Diversity of Archaea 17. Diversity of Microbial Eukarya IV. MICROBIAL ECOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY 18. Tools of the Microbial Ecologist 19. Microbial Ecosystems 20. Nutrient Cycles in Nature 21. Microbiology of the Built Environment 22. Microbial Symbioses V. PATHOGENICITY AND IMMUNOLOGY 23. Microbial Interactions with Humans 24. Principles of Immunology and Host Defense 25. Immune Mechanisms 26. Molecular Immunology 27. Clinical Microbiology and Immunology VI. INFECTIOUS DISEASES AND THEIR TRANSMISSION 28. Epidemiology 29. Person-to-Person Bacterial and Viral Diseases 30. Vectorborne and Soilborne Bacterial and Viral Diseases 31. Common Source Diseases: Food and Water 32. Fungal and Parasitic Diseases Appendix 1 Appendix 2 Glossary Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780321897398 20160619
ALERT: Before you purchase, check with your instructor or review your course syllabus to ensure that you select the correct ISBN. Several versions of Pearson's MyLab & Mastering products exist for each title, including customized versions for individual schools, and registrations are not transferable. In addition, you may need a CourseID, provided by your instructor, to register for and use Pearson's MyLab & Mastering products. Packages Access codes for Pearson's MyLab & Mastering products may not be included when purchasing or renting from companies other than Pearson; check with the seller before completing your purchase. Used or rental books If you rent or purchase a used book with an access code, the access code may have been redeemed previously and you may have to purchase a new access code. Access codes Access codes that are purchased from sellers other than Pearson carry a higher risk of being either the wrong ISBN or a previously redeemed code. Check with the seller prior to purchase. xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx The authoritative #1 textbook for introductory majors microbiology, Brock Biology of Microorganisms continues to set the standard for impeccable scholarship, accuracy, and outstanding illustrations and photos. This book for biology, microbiology, and other science majors balances cutting edge research with the concepts essential for understanding the field of microbiology, including strong coverage of ecology, evolution, and metabolism. The Fourteenth Edition seamlessly integrates the most current science, paying particular attention to molecular biology and how the genomic revolution has changed and is changing the field. This edition offers a streamlined, modern organization with a consistent level of detail and updated, visually compelling art program. Brock Biology of Microorganisms includes MasteringMicrobiology(R), an online homework, tutorial, and assessment product designed to improve results by helping students quickly master concepts both in and outside the classroom. The Fourteenth Edition and MasteringMicrobiology will provide a better teaching and learning experience-for you and your students. Brock Biology of Microorganisms Plus MasteringMicrobiology is designed to: *Personalize learning: MasteringMicrobiology coaches students through the toughest microbiology topics. Engaging tools help students visualize, practice, and understand crucial content.* Focus on today's learners: Research-based activities, case studies, and engaging activities improve students' ability to solve problems and make connections between concepts.*Teach tough topics with superior art and animations: Outstanding animations, illustrations, and micrographs enable students to understand difficult microbiology concepts and processes. Note: You are purchasing a standalone product; MasteringMicrobiology does not come packaged with this content. If you would like to purchase both the physical text and MasteringMicrobiology search for ISBN-10: 0321897072/ISBN-13: 9780321897077. That package includes ISBN-10: 0321897390/ISBN-13: 9780321897398 and ISBN-10: 0321943732/ISBN-13: 9780321943736. MasteringMicrobiology is not a self-paced technology and should only be purchased when required by an instructor.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780321897398 20160619
Science Library (Li and Ma)
CHEMENG-355-01
Book
1 volume (various pagings) : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 29 cm
  • INTRODUCTION TO THE CELL 1. Cells and Genomes 2. Cell Chemistry and Bioenergetics 3. Proteins BASIC GENETIC MECHANISMS 4. DNA, Chromosomes, and Genomes 5. DNA Replication, Repair, and Recombination 6. How Cells Read the Genome: From DNA to Protein 7. Control of Gene Expression WAYS OF WORKING WITH CELLS 8. Analyzing Cells, Molecules, and Systems 9. Visualizing Cells INTERNAL ORGANIZATION OF THE CELL 10. Membrane Structure 11. Membrane Transport of Small Molecules and the Electrical Properties of Membranes 12. Intracellular Compartments and Protein Sorting 13. Intracellular Membrane Traffic 14. Energy Conversion: Mitochondria and Chloroplasts 15. Cell Signaling 16. The Cytoskeleton 17. The Cell Cycle 18. Cell Death CELLS IN THEIR SOCIAL CONTEXT 19. Cell Junctions and the Extracellular Matrix 20. Cancer 21. Development of Multicellular Organisms 22. Stem Cells and Tissue Renewal 23. Pathogens and Infection 24. The Innate and Adaptive Immune Systems.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780815344322 20160618
As the amount of information in biology expands dramatically, it becomes increasingly important for textbooks to distill the vast amount of scientific knowledge into concise principles and enduring concepts.As with previous editions, Molecular Biology of the Cell, Sixth Edition accomplishes this goal with clear writing and beautiful illustrations. The Sixth Edition has been extensively revised and updated with the latest research in the field of cell biology, and it provides an exceptional framework for teaching and learning. The entire illustration program has been greatly enhanced.Protein structures better illustrate structure-function relationships, icons are simpler and more consistent within and between chapters, and micrographs have been refreshed and updated with newer, clearer, or better images. As a new feature, each chapter now contains intriguing openended questions highlighting "What We Don't Know, " introducing students to challenging areas of future research. Updated end-of-chapter problems reflect new research discussed in the text, and these problems have been expanded to all chapters by adding questions on developmental biology, tissues and stem cells, pathogens, and the immune system.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780815344322 20160618
Science Library (Li and Ma)
BIO-86-01, CHEMENG-355-01
Book
xvi, 966 pages : illustrations ; 28 cm
  • Contents: 1. Cells and Genomes 2. Cell Chemistry and Biosynthesis 3. Proteins 4. DNA, Chromosomes, and Genomes 5. DNA Replication, Repair and Recombination 6. How Cells Read the Genome: From DNA to Protein 7. Control of Gene Expression 8. Manipulating Proteins, DNA and RNA 9. Visualizing Cells - NEW TO THIS EDITION 10. Membrane Structure 11. Membrane Transport of Small Molecules and the Electrical Properties of Membranes 12. Intracellular Compartments and Protein Sorting 13. Intracellular Vesicular Transport 14. Energy Conversion: Mitochondria and Chloroplasts 15. Mechanisms of Cell Communication 16. The Cytoskeleton 17. The Cell Cycle 18. Apoptosis 19. Cell Junctions, Cell Adhesion, and the Extracellular Matrix - NEW TO THIS EDITION 20. Cancer - NEW TO THIS EDITION Glossary Index Tables.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780815344537 20160618
The Problems Book helps students appreciate the ways in which experiments and simple calculations can lead to an understanding of how cells work by introducing the experimental foundation of cell and molecular biology. Each chapter reviews key terms, tests for understanding basic concepts, and poses research-based problems. The Problems Book has been designed to correspond with the first twenty chapters of Molecular Biology of the Cell, Sixth Edition.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780815344537 20160618
Science Library (Li and Ma)
CHEMENG-355-01
Book
ii, 542 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
  • Preface to the Second Edition. Preface to the First Edition. I. INTRODUCTION. 1. What is a Bioprocess Engineer? Introductory Remarks. Biotechnology and Bioprocess Engineering. Biologists and Engineers Differ in Their Approach to Research. The Story of Penicillin: How Biologists and Engineers Work Together. Bioprocesses: Regulatory Constraints. Suggestions for Further Reading. Problems. II. THE BASICS OF BIOLOGY: AN ENGINEER'S PERSPECTIVE. 2. An Overview of Biological Basics. Are All Cells the Same? Cell Construction. Cell Nutrients. Summary. Suggestions for Further Reading. Problems. 3. Enzymes. Introduction. How Enzymes Work. Enzyme Kinetics. Immobilized Enzyme Systems. Large-scale Production of Enzymes. Medical and Industrial Utilization of Enzymes. Summary. Suggestions for Further Reading. Problems. 4. How Cells Work. Introduction. The Central Dogma. DNA Replication: Preserving and Propagating the Cellular Message. Transcription: Sending the Message. Translation: Message to Product. Metabolic Regulation. How the Cell Senses Its Extracellular Environment. Summary. Appendix: Examples of Regulation of Complex Pathways. Suggestions for Further Reading. Problems. 5. Major Metabolic Pathways. Introduction. Bioenergetics. Glucose Metabolism: Glycolysis and the TCA Cycle. Respiration. Control Sites in Aerobic Glucose Metabolism. Metabolism of Nitrogenous Compounds. Nitrogen Fixation. Metabolism of Hydrocarbons. Overview of Biosynthesis. Overview of Anaerobic Metabolism. Overview of Autotrophic Metabolism. Summary. Suggestions for Further Reading. Problems. 6. How Cells Grow. Introduction. Batch Growth. Quantifying Growth Kinetics. How Cells Grow in Continuous Culture. Summary. Suggestions for Further Reading. Problems. 7. Stoichiometry of Microbial Growth and Product Formation. Introduction. Some Other Definitions. Stoichiometric Calculations. Theoretical Predictions of Yield Coefficients. Summary. Suggestions for Further Reading. Problems. 8. How Cellular Information is Altered. Introduction. Evolving Desirable Biochemical Activities through Mutation and Selection. Natural Mechanisms for Gene Transfer and Rearrangement. Genetically Engineering Cells. Genomics. Summary. Suggestions for Further Reading. Problems. III. ENGINEERING PRINCIPLES FOR BIOPROCESSES. 9. Operating Considerations for Bioreactors for Suspension and Immobilized Cultures. Introduction. Choosing the Cultivation Method. Modifying Batch and Continuous Reactors. Immobolized Cell Systems. Solid-state Fermentations. Summary. Suggestions for Further Reading. Problems. 10. Selection, Scale-Up, Operation, and Control of Bioreactors. Introduction. Scale-up and Its Difficulties. Bioreactor Instrumentation and Control. Sterilization of Process Fluids. Summary. Suggestions for Further Reading. Problems. 11. Recovery and Purification of Products. Strategies to Recover and Purify Products. Separation of Insoluble Products. Cell Disruption. Separation of Soluble Products. Finishing Steps for Purification. Integration of Reaction and Separation. Summary. Suggestions for Further Reading. Problems. IV. APPLICATIONS TO NONCONVENTIONAL BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS. 12. Bioprocess Considerations in Using Animal Cell Cultures. Structure and Biochemistry of Animal Cells. Methods Used for the Cultivation of Animal Cells. Bioreactor Considerations for Animal Cell Culture. Products of Animal Cell Cultures. Summary. Suggestions for Further Reading. Problems. 13. Bioprocess Considerations in Using Plant Cell Cultures. Why Plant Cell Cultures? Plant Cells in Culture Compared to Microbes. Bioreactor Considerations. Economics of Plant Cell Tissue Cultures. Summary. Suggestions for Further Reading. Problems. 14. Utilizing Genetically Engineered Organisms. Introduction. How the Product Influences Process Decisions. Guidelines for Choosing Host-Vector Systems. Process Constraints: Genetic Instability. Considerations in Plasmid Design to Avoid Process Problems. Predicting HostDVector Interactions and Genetic Instability. Regulatory Constraints on Genetic Processes. Metabolic Engineering. Protein Engineering. Summary. Suggestions for Further Reading. Problems. 15. Medical Applications of Bioprocess Engineering. Introduction. Tissue Engineering. Gene Therapy Using Viral Vectors. Bioreactors. Summary. Suggestions for Further Reading. Problems. 16. Mixed Cultures. Introduction. Major Classes of Interactions in Mixed Cultures. Simple Models Describing Mixed-culture Interactions. Mixed Cultures in Nature. Industrial Utilization of Mixed Cultures. Biological Waste Treatment: An Example of the Industrial Utilization of Mixed Cultures. Summary. Suggestions for Further Reading. Problems. Appendix: Traditional Industrial Bioprocesses. Anaerobic Bioprocesses. Aerobic Processes. Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781292025995 20160612
For Senior-level and graduate courses in Biochemical Engineering, and for programs in Agricultural and Biological Engineering or Bioengineering. This concise yet comprehensive text introduces the essential concepts of bioprocessing-internal structure and functions of different types of microorganisms, major metabolic pathways, enzymes, microbial genetics, kinetics and stoichiometry of growth and product information-to traditional chemical engineers and those in related disciplines. It explores the engineering principles necessary for bioprocess synthesis and design, and illustrates the application of these principles to modern biotechnology for production of pharmaceuticals and biologics, solution of environmental problems, production of commodities, and medical applications.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781292025995 20160612
Science Library (Li and Ma)
CHEMENG-355-01
Book
xvii, 1000 p. : ill. (chiefly col.) ; 29 cm.
Acclaimed by students and instructors, "Molecular Biotechnology: Principles and Applications of Recombinant DNA" is now in its fourth edition, bringing it thoroughly up to date with the latest findings and the latest industrial, agricultural, pharmaceutical, and biomedical applications. At the same time, the text maintains all the hallmarks that have made it a bestseller. These include its straightforward, jargon-free writing style and its extensive use of figures that help students make sense of complex biological systems and processes. These features not only enable students to grasp core concepts, but also create the foundation needed to support their own research and development work using recombinant DNA technology. This fourth edition features greatly expanded coverage of the latest innovations in DNA sequencing techniques, therapeutics, vaccines, transgenic plants, and transgenic animals. Moreover, readers will find nearly 240 new figures to help them grasp all the latest concepts and applications. With its broad range of topics, Molecular Biotechnology is adaptable to different upper-level undergraduate and graduate courses emphasizing particular aspects of modern biotechnology. For example, instructors can easily tailor the content to courses focusing on the fundamentals of biotechnology as well as courses dedicated to medical, agricultural, environmental, or industrial applications. New edition presents 645 figures and 113 tables throughout the text, hundreds of which illustrate complex systems and processes. It includes chapter summaries highlighting key points. It contains references to the literature in each chapter facilitating detailed investigations of all topics covered in the text. It features end-of-chapter review questions enabling students to assess their knowledge. There are updated examples illustrating the latest concepts and applications.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781555814984 20160528
Science Library (Li and Ma), eReserve
CHEMENG-355-01
Book
xxi, 984 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Science Library (Li and Ma)
CHEMENG-355-01