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Book
382 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • The social turn: collaboration and its discontents
  • Artificial hells: the historic avant-garde
  • Je participe, tu participes, il participe
  • Social sadism made explicit
  • The social under socialism
  • Incidental people: APG and community arts
  • Former West: art as project in the early 1990s
  • Delegated performance: outsourcing authenticity
  • Pedagogic projects: 'how do you bring a classroom to life as if it were a work of art?'
  • Conclusion.
For over a decade, conceptual and performance art has been dominated by participatory art. Its champions, such as French curator Nicolas Bourriaud (who invented the term "relational aesthetics" to describe it) and American art historian Grant Kester, believe that by encouraging an audience to join in, the artist can promote new emancipatory social relations. Artificial Hells is the first historical and theoretical overview of socially engaged participatory art. The book follows the trajectory of twentieth-century art and examines key moments in the development of the participatory aesthetic, in both Europe and America. This itinerary takes in Futurism, Dada, Situationism, Czechoslovakian Happenings, and Argentinean Conceptualism, and concludes with contemporary artists such as Thomas Hirschhorn, Tania Bruguera and Jeremy Deller. Since her controversial essay in Artforum in 2006, Claire Bishop has been one of the few to expose the political and aesthetic limitations of this work. In Artificial Hells she not only scrutinizes the claims for democracy and emancipation that the artists and critics make for the work, but also questions the turn to ethical (rather than artistic) criteria invited by such participatory and collaborative art.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781844676903 20160609
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTSTUDI-230-01

2. Art power [2008]

Book
187, [3] p. ; 24 cm.
This new book by Boris Groys acknowledges the problem and potential of art's complex relationship to power.Art has its own power in the world, and is as much a force in the power play of global politics today as it once was in the arena of cold war politics. Art, argues distinguished theoretician Boris Groys, is hardly a powerless commodity subject to the art market's fiats of inclusion and exclusion. In "Art Power", Groys examines modern and contemporary art according to its ideological function. Art, Groys writes, is produced and brought before the public in two ways - as a commodity and as a tool of political propaganda. In the contemporary art scene, very little attention is paid to the latter function; the official and unofficial art of the former Soviet Union and other former Socialist states, for example, is largely excluded from the field of institutionally recognized art, usually on moral grounds (although, Groys points out, criticism of the morality of the market never leads to calls for a similar exclusion of art produced under market conditions).Arguing for the inclusion of politically motivated art in contemporary art discourse, Groys considers art produced under totalitarianism, Socialism, and post-Communism. He also considers today's mainstream Western art - which he finds behaving more and more according to the norms of ideological propaganda: produced and exhibited for the masses at international exhibitions, biennials, and festivals. Modern art, Groys argues, demonstrates its power by appropriating the iconoclastic gestures directed against itself - by positioning itself simultaneously as an image and as a critique of the image. In "Art Power", Groys examines this fundamental appropriation that produces the paradoxical object of the modern artwork.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780262072922 20160528
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTSTUDI-230-01
Book
255 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTSTUDI-230-01
Book
146 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTSTUDI-230-01