Book
128 pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 28 cm
One of the best-known artists of her time, and a true American legend, Anna Mary Robertson Grandma Moses (1860-1961) was often marginalized as a latter-day folk painter or a phenomenon of popular media. Accompanying a traveling exhibition, this new book looks closely at the paintings themselves and the artist's compelling biography to reassert her role in the development of a culture of modernist art at mid-century. Presenting fresh research, several scholars examine Moses's name, public persona, painted world, and wildly popular place in American pop culture; address the myth of the self-taught artist; and contextualize her work alongside such contemporaries as Horace Pippin, Elie Nadelman, Yasuo Kuniyoshi, and Morris Hirshfield.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780847849239 20160802
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-477-01
Book
223 pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 33 cm
  • Jean Dubuffet et la Suisse / Sarah Lombardi, Directrice de la Collection de l'Art Brut, Lausanne -- Lausanne: les opportunités de l'Histoire / Daniel Brélaz Syndic de Lausanne -- La Collection de l'Art Brut à Lausanne : un pari réussi / Sarah Lombardi -- Aux origines de la collection (1945-1971) -- Le voyage en Suisse de Jean Dubuffet en 1945 / Lia Bagutti -- Étudiante de master en histoire de l'art -- L'exposition "L'Art Brut" de Jean Dubuffet : un manifeste pour un art qui n'en a pas l'air / Sarah Lombardi -- L'Art Brut préféré aux arts culturels. Préface du catalogue de l'exposition "L'Art Brut", présentée à la galerie René Drouin, à Paris en 1949 / Jean Dubuffet -- "L'Art Brut", exposition à la galerie René Drouin, à Paris, en 1949. Sélection d'oeuvres -- La vie de la collection de 1950 à 1971 / Pascale Jeanneret Marini Conservatrice, Collection de l'Art Brut, Lausanne -- L'Art Brut aux États-Unis: infiltration et filtres de Jean Dubuffet / Valérie Rousseau Conservatrice, Self-Taught Art and Art Brut, American Folk Art Museum, New York -- Acquisitions entre 1950 et 1970 -- Sélection d'oeuvres De la donation à l'ouverture du musée (1971-1976) -- De Jean Dubuffet à Michel Thévoz, passage de témoin. Interview de Michel Thévoz, directeur de la Collection de l'Art Brut de 1976 à 2001 / Par Sarah Lombardi -- Le conseil consultatif / Michel Thévoz Directeur de la Collection de l'Art Brut de 1976 à 2001 -- Des "collections annexes" à la collection Neuve Invention / Sarah Lombardi -- Archives de la Collection de l'Art Brut : quelques notes / Vincent Monod -- Responsable de la bibliothèque et des images, Collection de l'Art Brut, Lausanne -- La Collection de l'Art Brut : 40 ans (1976-2016) -- 1976-2016: quarante ans d'acquisitions / Anie Zanzi Conservatrice, Collection de l'Art Brut, Lausanne -- L'ouverture des collections à d'autres continents. Interview de Lucienne Peiry, directrice de la Collection de l'Art Brut de 2001 à 2011 / Sarah Lombardi -- Spécificités techniques et enjeu de la conservation des oeuvres d'Art Brut / Mijanou Gold Technicienne des collections, Collection de l'Art Brut, Lausanne -- De "La seconde vie d'Armand Schulthess" à "L'Art Brut de Jean Dubuffet, aux origines de la collection" : quarante ans d'expositions / Astrid Berglund. Conservatrice, Collection de l'Art Brut, Lausanne -- Acquisitions entre 1976 et 2016 Sélection d'oeuvres.
"L'Art Brut de Jean Dubuffet, aux origines de la collection. En 1945, l'artiste français Jean Dubuffet invente l'oxymore "Art Brut" pour désigner les oeuvres réalisées par des autodidactes en marge du circuit officiel. Ayant réuni ces travaux sous forme de collection, il fera don de cet ensemble en 1971 à la Ville de Lausanne, qui inaugure la Collection de l'Art Brut en février 1976. Cet ouvrage, publié à l'occasion des quarante ans du musée, revient sur la naissance de l'institution lausannoise et sur les moments clés qui ont jalonné son développement. L'exposition qu'il accompagne met en lumière la première manifestation hors les murs de la Compagnie de l'Art Brut, intitulée "L'Art Brut", et présentée en 1949 à la galerie René Drouin, à Paris. Revisiter cet événement permet il, à la fois d'en mesurer l'audace et toute la portée critique pour l'époque, et de rassembler des oeuvres collectionnées par Jean Dubuffet entre 1945 et 1949, lesquelles forment le noyau d'origine de la Collection de l'Art Brut."--Page 4 of cover.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-477-01
Book
219 pages : illustrations ; 30 cm
  • "A real creator of creators" : how Mabel Dodge Luhan catalyzed American modernism / Lois P. Rudnick
  • Mabel Dodge Luhan : a new way to see and new things to say / MaLin Wilson-Powell
  • Whose history? Anglo patronage and the reframing of Hispano art and culture / Carmella Padilla.
Mabel Dodge Luhan (1879-1962) was a political, social, and cultural visionary. Over the years, she hosted famous gatherings in Florence and Greenwich Village, drawing a mix of intellectuals, writers and artists from East and West coasts and Europe. When Mabel Dodge moved to Taos, New Mexico and married the Native American Tony Lujan, they created a "Paris West" salon, putting Taos on the national and international map of the avant-garde. MDL's larger-than-life personality drew the likes of D H Lawrence, Jean Toomer, Mary Austin and Frank Waters; set designer Robert Edmond Jones; composer Carlos Chavez and musical impresario Leopold Stokowski; choreographer Martha Graham; and anthropologists Elsie Clews Parsons and John Collier to this funky little village in northern New Mexico. This book illustrates that fascinating Modernist period, and the topics Mabel Dodge Luhan and her friends were interested in: painting, photography, drama, psychology, radical politics, social reform and Native American rights.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780890136140 20160704
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-477-01
Book
xviii, 262 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of color plates : illustrations (some color) ; 24 cm
  • Note on Internet Citations and Additional Web Resources Preface: Stories about Stories Introduction. Once upon a Time: Encountering the Word Made Flesh 1. On the Finster Trail: The Business of Howard Finster's Divine Busyness 2. Signs of the Times: Howard Finster and Prophetic Reenchantment 3. The Matter of My Mission: Howard Finster's Religious Template 4. The First and Second Noah: Howard Finster's Ark of Myth and Meaning 5. The Finster Mythos: Just the Facts in Howard Finster's Mythic Life 6. Snakes in the Garden: Life and Death in Paradise 7. The Strange Beauty of Bad and Nasty Art: Toward a Finsterian Aesthetic Conclusion. Howard Finster: The Hidden Man of the Heart Notes Acknowledgments List of Illustrations Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520261099 20160618
The Reverend Howard Finster (1916-2001) was called the "backwoods William Blake" and the "Andy Warhol of the South, " and he is considered the godfather of contemporary American folk and visionary art. This book is the first interpretive analysis of the intertwined artistic and religious significance of Finster's work within the context of the American "outsider art" tradition. Finster began preaching as a teenager in the South in the 1930s. But it was not until he received a revelation from God at the age of sixty that he began to make sacred art. A modern-day Noah who saw his art as a religious crusade to save the world before it was too late, Finster worked around the clock, often subsisting on a diet of peanut butter and instant coffee. He spent the last years of his life feverishly creating his environmental artwork called Paradise Garden and what would ultimately number almost fifty thousand works of "bad and nasty art." This was visionary work that obsessively combined images and text and featured apocalyptic biblical imagery, flying saucers from outer space, and popular cultural icons such as Elvis Presley, Marilyn Monroe, Henry Ford, Mona Lisa, and George Washington. In the 1980s and 90s, he developed cult celebrity status, and he appeared in the Venice Biennale and on the Tonight Show. His work graced the album covers of bands such as R E M and Talking Heads. This book explores the life and religious-artistic significance of Finster and his work from the personal perspective of religion scholar Norman Girardot, friend to Finster and his family during the later years of the artist's life.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520261099 20160618
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-477-01
Book
375 pages : illustrations ; 29 cm
This lavishly illustrated volume is the first comprehensive study of the folk art collection purchased by the New-York Historical Society from Elie and Viola Nadelman in 1937. Exhibited by the couple from 1926 to 1937 in their pioneering Museum of Folk and Peasant Arts in Riverdale, New York, the nearly fifteen thousand works come from a collection spanning six centuries, thirteen countries, and a broad range of media. Authors Margaret K. Hofer and Roberta J.M. Olson explore a nucleus of some two hundred and sixteen highlights in eighty-seven catalog entries, as well asnine of Nadelman's own sculptures, and consider the possible interchanges between the Nadelman's collecting and his avant-garde art. Their research, employing new archival evidence from the Historical Society and the rich cache of Nadelman Papers, has resulted in exciting discoveries, among them Nadelman's active role in restoring some of his folk art objects.Featuring seven provocative essays, "Making It Modern "breaks new ground not only on the Nadelmans and folk art, but also in the history of American art and taste during the fast-paced cultural revolutions of the early twentieth century.Margaret K. Hofer is curator of decorative arts, New York Historical SocietyRoberta J.M. Olson is curator of drawings, New York Historical SocietyElizabeth Stillinger is an independent scholar.Kenneth L. Ames is professor at the Bard Graduate Center, New York City.Cynthia Nadelman is an independent scholar and writer.Barbara Haskell is the curator at the Whitney Museum of American Art.".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781907804298 20160618
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-477-01
Book
128 p. : ill. (chiefly col.) ; 29 cm
  • Foreword / Arnold L. Lehman
  • Introduction: Judith Scott and the politics of biography / Catherine Morris
  • Peer review / Lynne Cooke
  • Judith Scott: creative growth / Matthew Higgs
  • An Interview with Joyce Scott / Kevin Killian
  • Works in the exhibition: sculpture: works on paper.
Judith Scott's story has become widely known through several documentary films: born with Down syndrome, and institutionalized for thirty years, before moving to the Bay Area to be near her twin sister, Scott had long-hidden artistic sensibilities that were first discovered at the visionary Creative Growth Art Center in Oakland. There, she developed an affinity for fibre and other found materials, creating extraordinary and idiosyncratic objects - fastidiously assembled structures that radically challenge our attempts to define them as sculpture. In addition to illustrations of more than forty essential works, this volume includes a number of essays that trace Scott's artistic development and her place within the field of contemporary art as a whole. A previously unpublished interview with Scott's twin sister, Joyce, tells the story of how Judith's move from relative isolation to a supportive and nurturing environment allowed an unexpected and extraordinary talent to emerge and flourish.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783791353845 20160617
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-477-01
Book
ix, 412 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 28 cm
  • Preface
  • Before Pop there was folk
  • Alias Smith and Johns : an American cosmos
  • Rauschenberg's combines : subjective art for an objective age
  • Space is the place : other worlds in the Pop universe
  • Lichtenstein becomes Lichtenstein
  • Robert Indiana's signs and symbols
  • Ad men : Andy Warhol and James Rosenquist cross the great divide
  • The nearest faraway place : Billy Al Bengston and Pop life in LA
  • Eyes on California : Oldenburg, Warhol, Hockney, and Ruscha take the trip
  • Showdown on East Forty-seventh : Bob Dylan and Andy Warhol
  • The hunter gets captured by the game : graphics, film, music
  • Epilogue.
An original and insightful new history of Pop Art from one of the most important art historians of our time Thomas Crow's paradigm-changing book challenges existing narratives about the rise of Pop Art by situating it within larger cultural tides. While American Pop was indebted to its British predecessor's insistence that any creative pursuit is worthy of aesthetic consideration, Crow demonstrates that this inclusive attitude also had strong American roots. Folk becomes Crow's starting point in the advance of Pop. The folk revival occurred chiefly in the sphere of music during the 1930s and '40s, while folk art surfaced a decade later in the work of Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg. Crow eloquently examines the subsequent explosion of commercial imagery in visual art, alongside its repercussions in popular music and graphic design. Pop's practitioners become defined as artists whose distillation of the vernacular is able to capture the feelings stirring among a broad public, beginning with young participants in the politicized 1960s counterculture. Woody Guthrie and Roy Lichtenstein, Andy Warhol and Bob Dylan, Ed Ruscha and the Byrds, Pauline Boty and the Beatles, the Who and Damien Hirst are all considered together with key graphic designers such as Milton Glaser and Rick Griffin in this engaging book.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780300203974 20170123
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-477-01
Book
xiv, 476 pages : illustrations ; 26 cm.
  • i. Table of Contents ii. Acknowledgements iii. Contributors Introduction Luisa Del Giudice, Sabato Rodia's Towers in Watts and the Search for Common Ground 1. Situating Sabato Rodia and The Watts Towers: Art Movements, Cultural Contexts, and Migrations 1.1 Jo Farb Hernandez, Local Art, Global Issues: Tales of Survival and Demise Among Contemporary Art Environments 1.2 Guglielmo Bilancioni, Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere: Simon Rodia and Fantastic Architecture 1.3 Paul A. Harris, The Poetic Concrete of Sam Rodia's Watts Towers and the Concrete Poetry of Ronald Johnson 1.4 Thomas Harrison, Without Precedent: The Watts Towers 1.5 Richard Candida Smith, An Era of Grand Ambitions: Sam Rodia and California Modernism 1.6 Laura E. Ruberto, A California Detour on the Road to Italy: The Hubcap Ranch, the Napa Valley, and Italian American Identity 1.7 Felice Ceparano, The Gigli of Nola Festival in the Nineteenth Century 1.8 Kenneth Scambray, California and the Italian Immigrant Experience: The Artistic and Literary Contexts of Simon Rodia's Watts Towers 1.9 Luisa Del Giudice, Sabato Rodia's Towers in Watts: Art, Migration, and Italian Imaginaries 1.10 Joseph Sciorra, "Why a Man Makes the Shoes?": Italian American Art and Philosophy in Sabato Rodia's Watts Towers 1.11 George Epolito, Parallel Expression: Revealing the Artistic Contributions of Italian Immigrants in South America During the Era of Simon Rodia 2. The Watts Towers Contested: Conservation, Guardianship, and Cultural Heritage 2.1 Jeanne Morgan, CSRTW- Committee for Simon Rodia's Towers in Watts: Fifty Years of Guardianship 2.2 Jeffrey Herr, Simon Rodia's Towers: A Status Report 2.3 Sarah Schrank, Nuestro Pueblo: The Spatial and Cultural Politics of the Los Angeles' Watts Towers 2.4 Monica Barra, Reading the Watts Towers, Teaching Los Angeles: Story Telling and Public Art 2.5 Katia Ballacchino, Spires and Towers Between Tangible, Intangible and Contested Transnational Culture/Heritage 3. The Watts Towers & Community Development 3.1 Artists in Conversation: John Outterbridge, Judson Powell, Charles Dickson, Augustine Aguirre, Betye Saar, Kenzi Shiokawa (Panel moderated by Rosie Lee Hooks, Saturday, October 23, 2010, 121 Dodd Hall, UCLA) 3.2 Gail Brown, From Where I'm Standing Photo-Documentary Workshops at Watts Towers Arts Center: Building Community Through Self-Awareness and Self-Expression 3.3 Shirmel Hayden, The Watts Towers: Simon Rodia Fights Back Afterword Luisa Del Giudice, Personal Reflections on the Watts Towers Common Ground Initiative Appendices Appendix A1 - Conversations with Rodia 1953 - 1964 A.1.1 Interview of S. Rodia, with William Hale and Ray Wisniewsky, Watts, 1953. A.1.2. Interview with Simon Rodia (Excerpts) by William Hale and Ray Wisniewsky, Watts, 1953. A.1.3. Conversation with Sam Rodia, by Mae Babitz and Jeanne Morgan, Martinez, California, September 1960. A.1.4 Interviews, Part A, B, C with S. Rodia, by Ed Farrell, Jody Farrell, Bud Goldstone, Seymour Rosen, Martinez-- University of California, Berkeley-- and San Francisco Museum, California, September 1960. A.1.5 Report on Visits to Simon Rodia to CSRTW, from Jody Farrell (Bud Goldstone, Seymour Rosen, Ed Farrell and Jody Farrell), Martinez and Berkeley, California, October 17, 1961-- and San Francisco Museum of Art, October 19, 1961. A.1.6 Letter to the CSRTW, by Claudio Segre [Segre], Re: Visit with Rodia in Martinez, California, January 25, 1962. A.1.7 "New Yorker Reporter Visits Rodia, " Report to the CSRTW, Re: Interview with Simon Rodia and Relatives, by Calvin Trillin, Nicholas King, Jeanne Morgan, Beniamino Bufano, Martinez, California, August 30, 1964. A.1.8 Conversations with Rodia, Report by Jeanne Morgan, Re: Visits in Martinez, California, May 20, June 15, July 5, August 10, Sept. 10, 1964, and comments on New Yorker visit of Aug. 30, 1964. A.1.10 Last Conversation with Sam Rodia, Report by Jeanne Morgan, Re: Visit in Martinez, California, December 22, 1964. A.1.11 Interview, Part A and B, with S. Rodia, by Norma Ashley-David, Martinez, California, March [1964?]. A.1.12 Interview (Excerpts) with Rodia's Neighbors, Long Beach, California, by Bud Goldstone, 1963. A.4.13 Interview with S. Rodia, by Nicholas King, Martinez, California, September, 1990. Appendix A2 - CSRTW Campaign to Save the Watts Towers A.2.1 Nancie Cavanna Song Score, "Please Don't Tear Down the Towers" A.2.2 Campaign to Save the Watts Towers: Correspondence A.2.3 Miscellaneous Documents.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780823257973 20160618
Looming silently over the streets of South Central Los Angeles, the magical sculptures called the Watts Towers are one of the treasures of American vernacular art. A collection of seventeen connected structures that center on several towers, one of which a 99-foot high, all made from concrete-encassed iron adorned in found glass, ceramic, and shells, the Towers were made by the hands of Sabato (Sam) Rodia an Italian immigrant who built his dream world over thirty three years. Rodia called them: Nuestro Pueblo (Our Town). Construction worker by day, artist by night, once Rodia finished his masterpiece in 1954, sold the property and never saw his creation again. But the wondrous visionary world he made became one of the most significant works of art and architecture of the last century, a national and international icon, and a powerful symbol of local identity. Yet over half a century later, the enigma of the Watts Towers continues to challenge us: What are they? What do they mean? What drove the artist to build them? This book offers a rich, multi-faceted understanding of the artist, his monument, and the communities his legacy has so deeply affected. Here, historians, folklorists, , literary and film scholars, conservation specialists and other scholars join artists, filmmakers, and community activists to explore the many ways in which Rodia's work has been - and can be - understood. The essays confront the monument's place in contemporary debates about art and migration, in contested urban social spaces, and the links between art and community development. They also expand our understanding of the Watts Towers within the culture and history of the Italian diaspora. And here, also for the first time, long-silent archival materials from the UCLA Special Collections tell the "Watts Towers Narrative" in Rodia's own words as he reflects on his life and work. Today, the Watts Towers serves as "common ground" for the civic reengagement of art and community. This book is an essential resource for anyone wishing to experience the extraordinary legacy of Sabato Rodia: as an inspiring symbol of transformative creativity, of sustained resolve in adversity, and human vision, articulated around the Italian immigrant artist who created them.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780823257973 20160618
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-477-01
Book
xxv, 243 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 25 cm.
  • The Invention of Craft Introduction Part One: Manipulation The Centre Holds The Carved and the Flat The Undisciplined Artisan Poor Plain and Paltry: The Decline of Carving The Cutting Edge The Hands of Others Part Two: Mystery The Age of the Reveal Porcelain: A Modern Arcanum Sleights of Hand An Elastic Age Explained Away: Craft and Cultural Improvement The Task of Re-Enchantment The New Arcanists Part Three: Mechanical All Things But A Self State of Nature Replication and the Industrial Artisan The Reproductive Continuum Analogue Practice In and Out of Touch Part Four: Memory Craft as Memory Work Dismantling Ruskin United and Industrious Affective Relations Stitches in Time Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780857850669 20160610
Glenn Adamson's last book, Thinking Through Craft, offered an influential account of craft's position within modern and contemporary art. Now, in his engaging sequel, The Invention of Craft, his theoretical discussion of skilled work is extended back in time and across numerous disciplines. Adamson searches out the origins of modern craft, locating its emergence in the period of the industrial revolution. He demonstrates how craft was invented as industry's "other", a necessary counterpart to ideas of progress and upheaval. In the process, the magical and secretive culture of artisans was gradually dominated through division and explication. This left craft with an oppositional stance, a traditional or anti-modern position. The Invention of Craft ranges widely across media, from lock-making, wood-carving and iron-casting to fashion, architecture and design. It also moves back and forth between periods, from the 18th century to the present day, demonstrating how contemporary practice can be informed through the study of modern craft in its moment of invention.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780857850669 20160610
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-477-01

10. Chicago imagists [2011]

Book
165 p. : col. ill. ; 29 cm.
  • Introduction / Stephen Fleischman
  • Chronology / Leah Kolb
  • Chicago imagism: the derivation of a term / Lynne Warren
  • Fanning the flames in the Windy City / Stephen Fleischman
  • L.A. snap/Chicago crackle/New York pop / Richard H. Axsom
  • Chicago imagists: the plates
  • The brash, the sexy, and the political : Chicago and the imagists / Jane Simon
  • Second sex in the Second City: women of Chicago imagism / Cecile Whiting
  • Jest digestion: [truly awful] puns, [genitalia] jokes, and [caustic] wit in Chicago imagism / Lynne Warren
  • Artists' biographies / Leah Kolb.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-477-01
Book
240 p. : ill. (chiefly col.) ; 29 cm.
  • Acknowledgments
  • Introduction
  • Adolf Wölfli
  • Morris Hirshfield
  • Madge Gill
  • Bill Traylor
  • Aloïse Corbaz
  • Henry Darger
  • Martín Ramírez
  • August Walla
  • Nek Chand
  • Howard Finster
  • Thornton Dial
  • Michel Nedjar
  • Conclusion
  • Bibliography
  • Index
  • Illustration credits.
Visionary art, art brut, art of the insane, naive art, vernacular art, raw visionA" what do all these and many other categories describe? An art made outside the boundaries of official culture, first recognized more than a century ago by German psychiatrists who appreciated the profound artistic expression in the work of institutionalized patients. Promoted by brilliant museum curators like Alfred Barr and artists like Jean Dubuffet, such work became a wellspring of modern and contemporary art. This volume brings together works by twelve of the most influential self-taught artists to emerge during the past century. Each represents a facet of the outsider art phenomenon, from mental patients like Adolf Wolfli and Martin Ramirez, through vernacular masters like Bill Traylor and Thornton Dial, to artists who seem to be in touch with other worlds, such as Madge Gill and Henry Darger. Related artists are featured along with each key figure, allowing a fuller picture to emerge. This book presents a narrative of the history of outsider art, clarifies predominant theoretical issues, and draws comparisons with the modernist tradition. It brings into focus the enormous contributions self-taught artists have made to our understanding of creative genius and presents them in a book that will enthral anyone interested in Outsider Art.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783791344904 20160607
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-477-01
Book
xix, 441 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 27 cm.
  • The folk art idea
  • Folk art, ethnology, and antiquarianism
  • Folk art and modern art
  • The decorative and aesthetic uses of folk art
  • Folk art, patriotism, and nationalism.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-477-01

13. The craft reader [2010]

Book
xii, 641 pages : illustrations ; 27 cm
  • PART 1: HOW TO Sectional introduction 1. Otto Salomon, The Teacher's Handbook of Slojd 2. W. A. S. Benson, Elements of Handicraft and Design 3. George Sturt, The Wheelwright's Shop 4. Anni Albers, On Weaving 5. Eliot Wigginton, "Building a Log Cabin" 6. Debbie Stoller, Stitch'n'Bitch: the Knitter's Handbook PART 2: CRAFT AND THE INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION Sectional introduction 7. Charles Babbage, On the Economy of Machines and Manufactures 8. Peter Gaskell, Artisans and Machinery 9. Alexis de Tocqueville, Democracy in America 10. Samuel Smiles, Industrial Biography: Iron Workers and Tool Makers 11. Karl Marx, Capital 12. Harry Braverman, Labor and Monopoly Capitalism: The Degradation of Work in the Twentieth Century 13. Raphael Samuel, "The Workshop of the World: Steam Power and Hand Technology in Mid-Victorian Britain" 14. Michael Ettema, "Technological Innovation and Design Economics in Furniture Manufacture" 15. Siegfried Bing, Artistic America 16. Frank Lloyd Wright, Collected Writings 17. Hermann Muthesius, "Art and the Machine" 18. Adolf Loos, "Building Materials, " Neue Freie Presse (Aug. 28, 1898), reprinted in Loos, Speaking Into the Void: Collected Essays 1897-1900 (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1982) 19. Stefan Muthesius, "Handwerk/Kunsthandwerk" PART 3: MODERN CRAFT: IDEALISM AND REFORM Sectional Introduction 20. John Ruskin, The Stones of Venice 21. William Morris, "The Revival of Handicraft" 22. W. R. Lethaby, Form in Civilization: Collected Papers on Art and Labour 23. Ellen Gates Starr, "Art and Labor" 24. Vladimir Tatlin, "The Work Ahead of Us", "The Artist as an Organizer of Everyday Life" and "The Problem of the Relationship Between Man and Object" 25. Soetsu Yanagi, "The Way of Craftsmanship" 26. Bernard Leach, A Potter's Book 27. Ananda Coomawaraswamy, "Religious Ideas in Craftsmanship" 28. Kamaladevi Chattopadhyay, Indian Handicrafts 29. Rene Guenon, "Initiation and the Crafts" 30. Octavio Paz, In Praise of Hands: Contemporary Crafts of the World 31. M. C. Richards, Centering 32. Olivia Emery, Craftsman Lifestyle: The Gentle Revolution 33. George Nakashima, The Soul of A Tree: A Master Woodworker's Reflections 34. Edward S. Cooke, Jr., "The Long Shadow of William Morris: Paradigmatic Problems of Twentieth-Century American Furniture" PART 4: THE PRESENCE OF CRAFT IN THE AGE OF MASS PRODUCTION Sectional introduction 35. Salvatore Ferragamo, The Shoemaker of Dreams 36. Susan J. Terrio, "Crafting Grand Cru Chocolates in Contemporary France" 37. Sara Berry, "From Peasant to Artisan: Motor Mechanics in a Nigerian Town" 38. Nathan Silver, "Modes and Resources of Adhocism" 39. David T. Doris, "Destiny World: Textile Casualties in Southern Nigeria" 40. Sergei Alasheev, "On a Particular Kind of Love and the Specificity of Soviet Production" 41. Iftikhar Dadi, "Plastic Toys and Urban Craft in South Asia" 42. Philip Tinari, "Original Copies" 43. Norbert Wiener, "What is Cybernetics?" 44. Michael L. Dertouzos, "Individualized Automation" 45. Malcolm McCullough, Abstracting Craft: The Practiced Digital Hand 46. European Digital Artists Network (Richard Barbrook and Pit Schultz), "Digital Artisans Manifesto" 47. Rafael Cardoso, "Craft Versus Design: Moving Beyond a Tired Dichotomy." PART 5: CRAFT IN THEORY: WORKMANSHIP, ESSENCE, STATUS Sectional Introduction 48. David Pye, The Nature and Art of Workmanship 49. Henri Focillon, "Forms in the Realms of Matter" 50. Elsie Fogerty, Rhythm 51. Amadou Hampate Ba, "African Art: Where the Hand Has Ears" 52. Robert Farris Thompson, "Yoruba Artistic Criticism" 53. Martin Heidegger, "The Thing" 54. Kenneth Frampton, "Rappel a l'Ordre: The Case for the Tectonic" 55. Esther Leslie, "Walter Benjamin: Traces of Craft" 56. Theodor Adorno, "Functionalism Today 57. R. G. Collingwood, "Art and Craft" 58. Patrick Heron, "The Crafts in Relation to Contemporary Art" 59. Harold Rosenberg, "Art and Work" 60. John Bentley Mays, "Comment" 61. Alison Britton, The Maker's Eye PART 6: CRAFT IN ACTION: THE EVERYDAY, ART AND DESIGN Sectional introduction 62. Alfred Gell, "The Enchantment of Technology and the Technology of Enchantment" 63. Patrick R. McNaughton, The Mande Blacksmiths 64. Roland Barthes, "Toys" 65. Lucy Lippard, "Making Something From Nothing (toward a Definition of Women's 'Hobby Art')" 66. Rozsika Parker, "The Creation of Femininity" 67. Carole Tulloch, "There's No Place Like Home: Home Dressmaking and Creativity in the Jamaican Community of the 1940s to the 1960s" 68. Tanya Harrod, "House-Trained Objects: Notes Towards Writing an Alternative History of Modern Art" 69. Rose Slivka, "The New Ceramic Presence" 70. Philip Leider, "How I Spent My Summer Vacation or, Art and Politics in Nevada, Berkeley, San Francisco and Utah" 71. Robert Morris, "Some Notes on the Phenomenology of Making: The Search for the Motivated" 72. Lee Ufan, The Art of Encounter 73. Grayson Perry, "A Refuge for Artists Who Play It Safe" and "Let the Artisans Craft Our Future" 74. Walter Gropius, "The Manifesto of the Bauhaus" 75. Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, "Education and the Bauhaus" 76. Don Wallance, Shaping America's Products 77. Marguerite Wildenhain, "A Ceramist Speaks on Design" 78. Charles Eames, "The Making of a Craftsman" 79. Andrea Branzi, "The New Handicrafts" PART 7: CURATORIAL APPROACHES Sectional Introduction 80. Johanna Drucker, "Affectivity and Entropy: Production Aesthetics in Contemporary Sculpture" 81. Tami Katz-Frieberg, "Craftsmen in the Factory of Images" 82. Zandra Ahl, "And What Is Your Title?" 83. Anthea Black and Nicole Burisch, "Craft Hard, Die Free: Radical Curatorial Strategies for Craftivism in Unruly Contexts" 84. Julia Bryan-Wilson, Liz Collins, Sabrina Gschwandtner, Cat Mazza, and Allison Smith, "The Politics of Craft: A Roundtable" Annotated Guide to Further Reading General Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781847883049 20170206
From the canonical texts of the Arts and Crafts Movement to the radical thinking of today's "DIY" movement, from theoretical writings on the position of craft in distinction to Art and Design to how-to texts from renowned practitioners, from feminist histories of textiles to descriptions of the innovation born of necessity in Soviet factories and African auto-repair shops...The Craft Reader presents the first comprehensive anthology of writings on modern craft. Covering the period from the Industrial Revolution to today, the Reader draws on craft practice and theory from America, Europe, Asia and Africa. The world of craft is considered in its full breadth -- from pottery and weaving, to couture and chocolate-making, to contemporary art, architecture and curation. The writings are themed into sections and all extracts are individually introduced, placing each in its historical, cultural and artistic context. Bringing together an astonishing range of both classic and contemporary texts, The Craft Reader will be invaluable to any student or practitioner of Craft and also to readers in Art and Design. AUTHORS INCLUDE: Theodor Adorno, Anni Albers, Amadou Hampate Ba, Charles Babbage, Roland Barthes, Andrea Branzi, Alison Britton, Rafael Cardoso, Johanna Drucker, Charles Eames, Salvatore Ferragamo, Kenneth Frampton, Alfred Gell, Walter Gropius, Tanya Harrod, Martin Heidegger, Patrick Heron, Bernard Leach, Esther Leslie, W. R. Lethaby, Lucy Lippard, Adolf Loos, Karl Marx, William Morris, Robert Morris, Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, Stefan Muthesius, George Nakashima, Octavio Paz, Grayson Perry, M. C. Richards, John Ruskin, Raphael Samuel, Ellen Gates Starr, Debbie Stoller, Alexis de Tocqueville, Lee Ufan, Frank Lloyd Wright.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781847883049 20170206
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-477-01
Book
199 p. : ill. (chiefly col.) ; 29 cm.
Martin Ramirez created nearly 450 drawings of remarkable visual clarity and expressive power while confined in a California mental institution for more than twenty-five years. Diagnosed as schizophrenic, he achieved posthumous fame with recent exhibitions of his works. Eighty important drawings, culled from public and private collections, comprehensively survey his achievement and demonstrate that he was one of the great draftsmen of the twentieth century. The richness of Ramirez's drawings and the depth of historical and cultural influences in his work point to his deep engagement with society. The artist's unique process-employing found items, homemade pigments, matchsticks, and large swaths of paper- is explored, as are his personal experiences of poverty, exile, and confinement. The volume includes recent research about Ramirez's life, family, and art, and features examples from a cache of previously unknown drawings by Ramirez, whose discovery caused a great sensation. This dazzling book displays Ramirez's skill and inventiveness and shows why his work is worthy of its own place in the annals of modern art.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783791350486 20160604
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-477-01
Book
xv, 277 p., 8 p. of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 27 cm.
  • List of Illustrations-- Acknowledgments-- Introduction 1. Unpacking the Indian Corner-- 2. The White Man's Indian Art: Teaching Aesthetics at the Indian Schools-- 3. Playing Indian: Native American Art and Modern Aesthetics-- 4. The Indians in Kasebier's Studio-- 5. Angel DeCora's Cultural Politics Epilogue Notes-- Selected Bibliography-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780822344087 20160528
In the early twentieth century, Native American baskets, blankets, and bowls could be purchased from department stores, 'Indian stores', dealers, reform organizations, and government Indian schools. Men and women across the United States indulged in a widespread passion for collecting Native American art and displaying it in domestic nooks called 'Indian corners'. Elizabeth Hutchinson identifies collecting as part of a larger 'Indian craze', linking it to other activities such as the inclusion of Native American artefacts in art exhibitions sponsored by museums, arts and crafts societies, and World's Fairs and the use of indigenous handicrafts as models for non-Native artists exploring formal abstraction and emerging notions of artistic subjectivity. She argues that the Indian craze convinced policymakers that art was an aspect of 'traditional' Native culture worth preserving, an attitude that continues to influence popular attitudes and federal legislation. Illustrating her argument with images culled from turn-of-the-century publications, Hutchinson revises the standard history of the mainstream interest in Native American material culture as 'art'. While many see this as a development that took place in the Southwest after the First World War, Hutchinson reveals that this cross-cultural conversation occurred earlier and spread across the nation from west to east and from reservation to metropolis. She demonstrates that artists, teachers, and critics associated with the development of American modernism, including Arthur Wesley Dow and Gertrude Kasebier, were inspired by Native art. Native artists were also able to achieve some recognition as modern artists, as Hutchinson shows through her discussion of the Winnebago painter and educator Angel DeCora. By taking a trans-cultural approach, Hutchinson transforms our understanding of the place of Native Americans in modernist culture.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780822344087 20160528
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-477-01
Book
xv, 198 p., [32] p. of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 24 cm.
  • Painting a hidden life (1853-1904)
  • "Seem like murder here" (1904-1928)
  • "My heart struck sorrow" (1928-1930)
  • "Breaking through a wall of silence" (1930-1949).
Born into slavery on an Alabama plantation in 1853, Bill Traylor worked as a sharecropper for most of his life. But in 1928 he moved to Montgomery and changed his life, becoming a self-taught lyric painter of extraordinary ability and power. From 1936 to 1946, he sat on a street cornerold, ill, and homelessand created well over 1,200 paintings. Collected and later promoted by Charles Shannon, a young Montgomery artist, his work received star placement in the Corcoran Gallery's 1982 exhibition "Black Folk Art in America." From then on, the spare and powerful "radical modernity" of Traylor's work helped place him among the rising stars of twentieth-century American artists. Most critics and art historians who analyze Traylor's paintings emphasize his extraordinary form and evaluate the content as either simple or enigmatic narratives of black life. In PAINTING A HIDDEN LIFE, historian Mechal Sobel's trenchant analysis reveals a previously unrecognized central core of meaning in Traylor.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780807134016 20160527
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-477-01
Book
xi, 248 p., [8] p. of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction : a world apart
  • Mabel Dodge's place
  • John Collier's place
  • Nina Otero-Warren's place
  • Carl Van Vechten's place
  • Tony Lujan's place
  • Mary Austin's place
  • D.H. Lawrence's place
  • Epilogue : Georgia O'Keeffe's place.
They all came to Taos: Georgia O'Keefe, D. H. Lawrence, Carl Van Vechten, and other expatriates of New York City. Fleeing urban ugliness, they moved west between 1917 and 1929 to join the community that art patron Mabel Dodge created in her Taos salon and to draw inspiration from New Mexico's mountain desert and "primitive" peoples. As they settled, their quest for the primitive forged a link between "authentic" places and those who called them home.In this first book, to consider Dodge and her visitors from a New Mexican perspective, Flannery Burke shows how these cultural mavens drew on modernist concepts of primitivism to construct their personal visions and cultural agendas. In each chapter, she presents a place as it took shape for a different individual within Dodge's orbit. From this kaleidoscope of places emerges a vision of what place meant to modernist artists - as well as a narrative of what happened in the real place of New Mexico when visitors decided it was where they belonged. Expanding the picture of early American modernism beyond New York's dominance, she shows that these newcomers believed Taos was the place they had set out to find - and that when Taos failed to meet their expectations, they changed Taos.Throughout, Burke examines the ways notions of primitivism unfolded as Dodge's salon attracted artists of varying ethnicities and the ways that patronage was perceived - by African American writers seeking publication, Anglos seeking "authentic" material, Native American artists seeking patronage, or Nuevomexicanos simply seeking respect. She considers the notion of "competitive primitivism, " especially regarding Carl Van Vechten, and offers nuanced analyses of divisions within northern New Mexico's arts communities over land issues and of the ways in which Pueblo Indians spoke on their own behalf.Burke's book offers a portrait of a place as it took shape both aesthetically in the imaginations of Dodge's visitors and materially in the lives of everyday New Mexicans. It clearly shows that no people or places stand outside the modern world - and that when we pretend otherwise, those people and places inevitably suffer.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780700615797 20160528
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-477-01
Book
vii, 392 p. : ill. (chiefly col.) ; 26 cm.
Struck by the beauty of every visible object in a Shaker kitchen they chanced to visit in 1923, young Edward Deming Andrews and his wife, Faith Young Andrews, embarked on a collection that became the passion of their lives. During the following decades, at a time when the art and artefacts of the Shakers were considered "low" art and unworthy of collecting or exhibiting, the Andrewses energetically collected objects, studied sources, and eventually mounted exhibits and published books on Shaker culture.This beautiful book is the first to document their unparalleled collection, presenting some 600 photographs, most never before published. In addition, the book brings to light the extraordinary story of the Andrewses' collecting and scholarship, their relationships with members of the United Society of Believers (commonly called Shakers) and with important New York City art-world figures of the 1930s, as well as their contributions toward the birth of the field of Shaker Studies. More than passionate collectors, Edward and Faith Andrews were intent on saving a distinct culture, and their accomplishment was to preserve for future generations the most comprehensive body of knowledge ever assembled about the Shakers.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780300137606 20160528
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-477-01
Book
x, 292 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
In works of silver and wool, the Navajos have established a unique brand of American craft. And when their artisans were integrated into the American economy during the late nineteenth century, they became part of a complex cultural and economic framework in which their handmade crafts conveyed meanings beyond simple adornment.As Anglo tourists discovered these crafts, the Navajo weavings and jewelry gained appeal from the romanticized notion that their producers were part of a primitive group whose traditions were destined to vanish. Erika Bsumek now explores the complex links between Indian identity and the emergence of tourism in the Southwest to reveal how production, distribution, and consumption became interdependent concepts shaped by the forces of consumerism, race relations, and federal policy.Bsumek unravels the layers of meaning that surround the branding of 'Indian made'. When Navajo artisans produced their goods, collaborating traders, tourist industry personnel, and even ethnologists created a vision of Navajo culture that had little to do with Navajos themselves. And as Anglos consumed Navajo crafts, they also consumed the romantic notion of Navajos as 'primitives' perpetuated by the marketplace. These processes of production and consumption reinforced each other, creating a symbiotic relationship and influencing both mutual Anglo-Navajo perceptions and the ways in which Navajos participated in the modern marketplace.Examining varied sites of production - artisans' workshops, museums, trading posts - Bsumek shows how the market economy perpetuated 'Navaho' stereotypes and cultural assumptions. She takes readers into the hogans where men worked silver and women wove rugs and into the outlets where middlemen dictated what buyers wanted and where Navajos influenced inventory. Exploring this process over seven decades, she describes how artisans' increasing use of modern tools created controversy about authenticity and how the meaning of the 'Indian made' label was even challenged in court.Ultimately, Bsumek shows that the sale of Indian-made goods cannot be explained solely through supply and demand. It must also reckon with the multiple images and narratives that grew up around the goods themselves, integrating consumer culture, tourism, and history to open new perspectives on our understanding of American Indian material culture.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780700615957 20160528
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-477-01
Book
xv, 251 p. : ill. (chiefly col.), col. map ; 31 cm. + 1 videodisc (4 3/4 in.)
James Castle (1899-1977) never learned to speak, read, or write, nor did he ever leave his native state of Idaho, and yet he created a wide range of extraordinary works that resonate with much of twentieth-century art. This book offers the first critical exploration of the many creative genres of this self-taught artist, who first came to notice in the 1950s and 1960s but has only recently been recognized by major museums.Lavishly illustrated with more than 300 full-colour reproductions and packaged with an original documentary DVD illuminating fascinating aspects of his life and art, this book examines Castle's drawings, colour-wash works, idiosyncratic cardboard and paper constructions, and word, sign, and symbol pieces. As a child he developed his favourite medium and method of working, mixing stove soot with saliva and applying this "ink" with sharpened sticks and cotton wads to such found materials as product packaging and discarded paper. These everyday materials have given his works a singular, immediate, and appealing natural quality.This engaging volume considers Castle's remarkable art from a variety of perspectives, examining his life, modes of depiction, working methods and materials, and the "visual poetry" of his text works.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780300137309 20160528
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-477-01