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Book
392 pages ; 32 cm
A comprehensive and breathtakingly illustrated presentation of the genius of Michelangelo by the world's leading expert on the artist The Italian Renaissance master Michelangelo Buonarroti (1475-1564) was especially celebrated for his disegno, a term that embraces both drawing and conceptual design. Featuring more than 200 drawings as well as paintings, sculpture, and architectural plans and views, this authoritative examines Michelangelo as "the divine draftsman and designer" whose work, according to Giorgio Vasari, embodied the unity of the arts. Carmen C. Bambach delivers a thorough and engaging narrative of the artist's long career, beginning with his training under Ghirlandaio and Bertoldo and ending with his 17-year appointment as chief architect of St. Peter's Basilica at the Vatican. In each thematic chapter, related drawings and other works are illustrated and discussed together, many for the first time, to provide new insights into Michelangelo's creative process. In addition to St. Peter's, other featured projects include the Sistine Chapel ceiling, the Tomb of Pope Julius II, and the architecture of the Campidoglio in Rome. Michelangelo's theories of art are also explored, and new consideration is given to his personal life and affections and their effect on his creative output. Magnificent in every way, this book will be the foremost publication about this remarkable artist for many years.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781588396372 20171121
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-423B-01
Book
264 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 29 cm
  • Why did sculptors draw? / Michael W. Cole
  • The power of invention: goldsmiths and disegno in the Renaissance / Davide Gasparotto
  • The sculptor-architect's drawing and exchanges between the arts / Alina Payne
  • Disegno as ritratto: drawing in the biography of Baccio Bandinelli / Linda Wolk-Simon
  • The sculptor as draftsman: a motif in Florentine portraiture / Oliver Tostmann.
The self-portrait of Baccio Bandinelli in the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Boston, shows the sculptor pointing not to a work of marble or bronze, but to a drawing. Bandinelli was particularly proud of his skills as a draftsman, and he was prolific in his production of works on paper. This set him apart from contemporaries in his profession; many Renaissance sculptors left us no drawings at all. Accompanying an exhibition at the Gardner Museum, this publication will put Bandinelli s portrait in context by looking at the practice of drawing by sculptors from the Renaissance to the Baroque in Central Italy.A focus of the book will be Bandinelli s own drawings and the development of his practice across his career and his experimentation with different media. Bandinelli s drawings will be compared with those of Michelangelo and Cellini. The broader question considered, however, is when, how and why sculptors drew. Every Renaissance sculptor who set out to make a work in metal or stone would first have made a series of preparatory models in wax, clay and/or stucco. Drawing was not an essential practice for sculptors in the way it was for painters, and indeed, most surviving sculptors drawings are not preparatory studies for works they subsequently executed in three dimensions. By comparing both rough sketches and more finished drawings with related three-dimensional works by the same artists, the importance of drawing for various individual sculptors will be examined.When sculptors did draw, it often indicated something about the artist s training or about his ambitions. Among the most accomplished draftsmen were artists like Pollaiuolo, Verrocchio and Cellini, who had come to sculpture by way of goldsmithery, a profession that required proficiency in ornamental design. Artists who sought to become architects, meanwhile the likes of Michelangelo, Giambologna and Ammanati similarly needed to learn to draw, since architects had to provide plans, elevations and other drawings to assistants and clients and had to imagine the place of individual figures within a larger multi-media ensemble. Certain kinds of projects, moreover fountains and tombs, for example required drawings to a degree that others did not. Sections on the Renaissance goldsmith-sculptor and sculptor-architect will allow comparison of the place drawing had in various artists careers.Beginning with a chapter dedicated to the importance of draftsmanship in the education of sculptors, showing works by Finiguerra, Cellini Bandinelli and Giambologna, the book will be split up into chapters dealing with the various challenges sculptors faced while drawing objects in the round, reliefs, and architectural structures. A central section will focus on Bandinelli, demonstrating the importance drawing held for him while he was preparing sculptures and as an independent token of his artistry.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781907372704 20160617
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-423B-01
Book
xiii, 191 pages, plates : illustrations (some color) ; 25 cm
  • The force of art
  • Circumscription
  • Flexion
  • Motivation.
In late 1504 and early 1505, Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) and Michelangelo Buonarroti (1475-1564) were both at work on commissions they had received to paint murals in Florence's City Hall. Leonardo was to depict a historic battle between Florence and Milan, Michelangelo one between Florence and Pisa. Though neither project was ever completed, the painters' mythic encounter shaped art and its history in the decades and centuries that followed. This concise, lucid, and thought-provoking book looks again at the one moment when Leonardo and Michelangelo worked side by side, seeking to identify the roots of their differing ideas of the figure in 15th-century pictorial practices and to understand what this contrast meant to the artists and writers who followed them. Through close investigation of these two artists, Michael W. Cole provides a new account of critical developments in Italian Renaissance painting.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780300208207 20171009
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-423B-01
Book
viii, 226 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 26 cm
  • Acknowledgments Introduction: Long-Distance Pictures 1. Dilemmas of Delivery in Copley's Atlantic 2. Audubon's Burden: Materiality and Transmission in The Birds of America 3. Gathering Moss: Asher B. Durand and the Deceleration of Landscape Epilogue: Material Visual Culture Notes Selected Bibliography List of Illustrations Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520251847 20160616
Transporting Visions follows pictures as they traveled through and over the swamps, forests, towns, oceans, and rivers of British America and the United States between 1760 and 1860. Taking seriously the complications involved in moving pictures through the physical world--the sheer bulk and weight of canvases, the delays inherent in long-distance reception, the perpetual threat to the stability and mnemonic capacity of images, the uneasy mingling of artworks with other kinds of things in transit--Jennifer L. Roberts forges a model for a material history of visual communication in early America. Focusing on paintings and prints by John Singleton Copley, John James Audubon, and Asher B. Durand--which were designed with mobility in mind--Roberts shows how an analysis of such imagery opens new perspectives on the most fundamental problems of early American commodity circulation, geographic expansion, and social cohesion.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520251847 20160616
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-423B-01
Book
x, 293 pages : illustrations (some color), maps (some color) ; 29 cm
This important and innovative book examines artists' mobility as a critical aspect of Italian Renaissance art. It is well known that many eminent artists such as Cimabue, Giotto, Donatello, Lotto, Michelangelo, Raphael, and Titian traveled. This book is the first to consider the sixteenth-century literary descriptions of their journeys in relation to the larger Renaissance discourse concerning mobility, geography, the act of creation, and selfhood. David Young Kim carefully explores relevant themes in Giorgio Vasari's monumental Lives of the Artists, in particular how style was understood to register an artist's encounter with place. Through new readings of critical ideas, long-standing regional prejudices, and entire biographies, The Traveling Artist in the Italian Renaissance provides a groundbreaking case for the significance of mobility in the interpretation of art and the wider discipline of art history.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780300198676 20160617
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-423B-01
Book
205 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 31 cm
  • The drawings of Michelangelo at Casa Buonarroti. Short history of an extraordinary collection / Pina Ragioniere
  • Michelangelo: sacred and profane / John T. Spike
  • Figure drawings
  • Michelangelo. Architectural drawings from the Casa Buonarroti / Adriano Marinazzo
  • Architectural drawings
  • Some sources for Michelangelo's Porta Pia / Aaron De Groft.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-423B-01
Book
364 p. : ill. ; 27 cm.
  • Introduction i Chapter 1: Models 21 Chapter 2: Professions 51 Chapter 3: Naturalism 90 Chapter 4: Pose 121 Chapter 5: Sculpture as Architecture 158 Chapter 6: Chapels 193 Chapter 7: Sculpture in the City 244 Conclusion 283 Photo Credits 287 Notes 293 Acknowledgments 353 Index 357.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691147444 20160605
Ambitious Form describes the transformation of Italian sculpture during the neglected half century between the death of Michelangelo and the rise of Bernini. The book follows the Florentine careers of three major sculptors--Giambologna, Bartolomeo Ammanati, and Vincenzo Danti--as they negotiated the politics of the Medici court and eyed one another's work, setting new aims for their art in the process. Only through a comparative look at Giambologna and his contemporaries, it argues, can we understand them individually--or understand the period in which they worked. Michael Cole shows how the concerns of central Italian artists changed during the last decades of the Cinquecento. Whereas their predecessors had focused on specific objects and on the particularities of materials, late sixteenth-century sculptors turned their attention to models and design. The iconic figure gave way to the pose, individualized characters to abstractions. Above all, the multiplicity of master crafts that had once divided sculptors into those who fashioned gold or bronze or stone yielded to a more unifying aspiration, as nearly every ambitious sculptor, whatever his training, strove to become an architect.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691147444 20160605
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-423B-01
Book
223 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 31 cm.
In The Book of the Wind Alessandro Nova has selected texts and images to create a history of the wind that illustrates his belief that the artistic representation of the invisible, the metaphorical nature of the phenomenon, and the challenge that it presents for perception require increasing our inner world through an expansion of our perceptual horizon. The wind - a natural phenomenon both salutary and injurious - has inspired myths, literary texts, and works of art in every era and place. The Book of the Wind offers a contemporary and original reflection on one of the most intriguing questions in art history - how can the immaterial be depicted?
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780773538337 20160605
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-423B-01
Book
xv, 214 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Part I. Introduction: 1. From Tuscan to Latin and not vice versa-- 2. Regiomontanus, Durer and the Edito princeps-- 3. The Tuscan vernacular text, its Prologue and Dedication to Brunelleschi-- 4. The false priority of Latin-- 5. The Florentine tradition-- 6. From Janitschek to Grayson-- Part II. Text: 7. Prologue addressed to Filippo Brunelleschi-- 8. Letter to Giovanni Francesco Prince of Mantua-- 9. Book one: the rudiments-- 10. Book two: the picture-- 11. Book three: the painter.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107000629 20160605
Leon Battista Alberti was one of the most important humanist scholars of the Italian Renaissance. Active in mid-fifteenth-century Florence, he was an architect, theorist, and author of texts on perspective and painting. Leon Battista Alberti: On Painting is a cardinal work that revolutionized Western art. In this volume Rocco Sinisgalli presents a new English translation and critical examination of Alberti's seminal text. Dr Sinisgalli reverses the received understanding of the relationship between the Italian and Latin versions of Alberti's treatise by demonstrating that Alberti wrote it first in Italian and then translated it into a polished Latin over the course of several decades. This volume is richly illustrated to help demonstrate how Alberti understood optics and art.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107000629 20160605
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-423B-01
Book
xvi, 366 p. : ill. (chiefly col.) ; 27 cm.
  • Preface ix Acknowledgments xiii Chapter 1: Hieroglyphs of the Mind 1 Chapter 2: O n the Same Page 35 Chapter 3: Picture Writing 69 Chapter 4: Making a Name 97 Chapter 5: Crowded Sheets 127 Chapter 6: Private in Public 173 Chapter 7: V at. lat. 3211 235 Chapter 8: Drawing the Line 287 Notes 305 Credits 353 Index 357.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691147666 20160605
Michelangelo is best known for great artistic achievements such as the Sistine ceiling, the David, the Piet, and the dome of St. Peter's. Yet throughout his seventy-five year career, he was engaged in another artistic act that until now has been largely overlooked: he not only filled hundreds of sheets of paper with exquisite drawings, sketches, and doodles, but also, on fully a third of these sheets, composed his own words. Here we can read the artist's marginal notes to his most enduring masterpieces; workaday memos to assistants and pupils; poetry and letters; and achingly personal expressions of ambition and despair surely meant for nobody's eyes but his own. Michelangelo: A Life on Paper is the first book to examine this intriguing interplay of words and images, providing insight into his life and work as never before. This sumptuous volume brings together more than two hundred stunning, museum-quality reproductions of Michelangelo's most private papers, many in color. Accompanying them is Leonard Barkan's vivid narrative, which explains the important role the written word played in the artist's monumental public output. What emerges is a wealth of startling juxtapositions: perfectly inscribed sonnets and tantalizing fragments, such as "Have patience, love me, sufficient consolation"; careful notations listing money spent for chickens, oxen, and funeral rites for the artist's father; a beautiful drawing of a Madonna and child next to a mock love poem that begins, "You have a face sweeter than boiled grape juice, and a snail seems to have passed over it." Magnificently illustrated and superbly detailed, this book provides a rare and intimate look at how Michelangelo's artistic genius expressed itself in words as well as pictures.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691147666 20160605
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-423B-01
Book
415 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 31 cm.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-423B-01
Book
ix, 292 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 30 cm.
  • Retrospection and modernity
  • Orders of reform
  • Vision and icon
  • History into mystery
  • The legacy of the Renaissance and the contemporary cult image
  • The quest for vaghezza
  • What's in a word? : vaghezza in the language of criticism
  • Figures of vaghezza
  • Other vaghezze : painting the loveliness of the world
  • Colors of vaghezza : ornament, desire, and spiritual fervor in Barocci's coloring
  • Ut pictura musica.
Federico Barocci was among the most admired painters in sixteenth-century Italy, but the distinctive nature of his compelling altarpieces and their historical importance have never been fully understood. This important study relates Barocci's achievements to transformations in the theory and practice of painting during an era in which pictorial developments generated deep tensions for ecclesiastical art.Barocci was celebrated as one of the only painters whose religious works combined the sensuous allure increasingly desired in modern art with profound devotion. Through a close study of Barocci's work and of documents ranging from letters to art theory, Stuart Lingo reconstructs how the painter accomplished his artistic and cultural miracle. In so doing, he offers new insights into critical artistic issues in the late Renaissance, from the cultural significance of stylistic choices to the early development of analogies between painting and music as affective arts.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780300121254 20160528
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-423B-01
Book
xii, 225 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
  • Introduction: Rhetoric and the Visual-- Part I: Theory-- 1. Gesture, representation and persuasion in Alberti's De Pictura-- 2. Theoretical foundations of persuasive architecture: Barbaro, Spini and Scamozzi--Part II: Invention-- 3. How to achieve persuasion in painting: The common ground-- 4. Visual persuasion in British architecture of the 17th and 18th century-- Part III: Interpretation-- 5. Rhetorical interpretation of the visual arts-- 6. Only the human can speak to man: Rhetorical interpretations of architecture.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521844352 20160528
In this book, Caroline van Eck examines how rhetoric and the arts interacted in early modern Europe. She argues that rhetoric, though originally developed for persuasive speech, has always used the visual as an important means of persuasion, and hence offers a number of strategies and concepts for visual persuasion as well. The book is divided into three major sections - theory, invention, and design. Van Eck analyzes how rhetoric informed artistic practice, theory, and perception in early modern Europe. This is the first full-length study to look at the issue of visual persuasion in both architecture and the visual arts, and to investigate what roles rhetoric played in visual persuasion, both from the perspective of artists and that of viewers.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521844352 20160528
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-423B-01
Book
xviii, 251 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-423B-01
Book
xiv, 267 p., 8 p. of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 26 cm.
  • 1. Introduction: The topos of lifelikeness-- 2. The analogical relationship of art and life: concepts and language-- 3. (Dis)Assembling: Michelangelo and Marsyas-- 4. Mona Lisa's 'beating pulse'-- 5. Nosce te ipsum: Narcissus, mirrors, and monsters-- 6. The lifeless and the (re)animation of the lifelike-- 7. Postscript.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521821599 20160528
Since classical antiquity, artists have rendered images in painting and sculpture that are so highly mimetic as to be nearly lifelike. Within this long history of strikingly lifelike images, works produced during the Italian renaissance are of special interest. During the sixteenth century, the critical language describing such works of art was codified. This same period witnessed the advent of early modern medicine and anatomical science. As art critics and theorists discussed the vivid immediacy and illusionist potency of art works in terms of aliveness, physicians such as Andreas Vasalius and Realdo Columbo investigated aliveness as a physiological condition of being, and particularly the nature of the soul. Bringing together a wealth of research and ideas from the histories of art, medicine, and natural philosophy, this book demonstrates the significance of lifelikeness for contemporaries and also considers the implications of claims that artwork is 'a living thing.'.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521821599 20160528
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-423B-01
Book
494 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 25 cm.
Martin Luther preached the radical notion that we are saved through faith alone. With one stroke, he overturned a thousand years of practice and teaching. Gone was the need for saintly intercessors and a special priesthood or the richly decorated and image-filled churches in which such mediation could take place. What counted now was faith arriving inwardly, in each individual, through the text of the Bible - the naked Word of God itself. But if words - not iconic images - led the believer to salvation, why didn't religious imagery disappear during the Reformation? The answer, according to Joseph Leo Koerner's masterful "The Reformation of the Image", lies in the paradoxical nature of Protestant religious imagery itself, which is at once both iconic and iconoclastic. According to Koerner, it is this "iconoclash" that characterizes Reformation art. "The Reformation of the Image" compellingly shows how visual art became indispensable to a religious movement built on words. It also reveals in Protestant images a powerful instance of modern disenchantment: the disappearance of magic both from images and from the world.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226450063 20160528
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-423B-01
Book
xvi, 84 p. : ill. ; 19 cm.
  • The metamorphoses of marble
  • The finger of god
  • The gravity of art.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-423B-01
Book
xxii, 154 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
Ascanio Condivi, a young pupil of and assistant to Michelangelo, gained the trust and respect of the great artist. This is a reissued translation of Condivi's account of Michelangelo's life. The biography is based to a large extent on the artist's own words, telling the story of his life, his relationship with his patrons, his objectives as an artist and his accomplishments. First published in 1976, this translation now includes a revised introduction based on research, as well as a bibliography and endnotes section.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780271018539 20160528
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-423B-01
Book
859 p. : ill., maps ; 27 cm.
A collection of essays by the art historian Aby Warburg, these essays look beyond iconography to more psychological aspects of artistic creation: the conditions under which art was practised; its social and cultural contexts; and its conceivable historical meaning.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780892365371 20160528
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-423B-01
Book
xxxiii, 428 p. : ill., ; 27 cm.
The cultural story of the unearthing of famous artworks in the 15th century. Employing a variety of approaches, it probes the impact of archaeological finds on Renaissance consciousness, and the rebirth of art history as objects confirmed or refuted the written records of antiquity.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780300076776 20160527
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-423B-01