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Book
xx, 284 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • What is it?
  • Who has it? And why?
  • When did it become big business? --Where should it go?
  • How can you use it, fix it, or love it?
"Junk has become ubiquitous in America today. Who doesn't have a basement, attic, closet, or storage unit filled with stuff too good to throw away? Or, more accurately, stuff you think is too good to throw away. When journalist and author Alison Stewart was confronted with emptying her late parents' overloaded basement, a job that dragged on for months, it got her thinking: How did it come to this? Why do smart, successful people hold on to old Christmas bows, chipped knick-knacks, VHS tapes, and books they would likely never reread? She discovered she was not alone. Junk details Stewart's three-year investigation into America's stuff, lots and lots and lots of stuff. Stewart rides along with junk removal teams from around the country such as Trash Daddy, Annie Haul, and Junk Vets. She goes backstage to a taping of Antiques Roadshow, and learns what makes for compelling junk-based television with the executive producer of Pawn Stars. And she even investigates the growing problem of space junk--23,000 pieces of manmade debris orbiting the planet at 17,500 mph, threatening both satellites and human space exploration. But it's not all dire. There are creative solutions to America's overburdened consumer culture. Stewart visits with Deron Beal, founder of FreeCycle, an online community of people who would rather give away than throw away their no-longer-needed possessions. She spends a day at a Repair Cafe, where volunteer tinkerers bring new life to broken appliances, toys, and just about anything. Stewart also explores communities of "tiny houses" without attics and basements in which to stash the owners' trash. Junk is a delightful journey through 250-mile-long yard sales, and packrat dens, both human and rodent, that for most readers will look surprisingly familiar"-- Provided by publisher.
"When journalist and author Alison Stewart was confronted with emptying her late parents' overloaded basement, a job that dragged on for months, it got her thinking: How did it come to this? Why do smart, successful people hold on to old Christmas bows, chipped knick-knacks, VHS tapes, and books they would likely never reread? Junk details Stewart's three-year investigation into America's stuff. She rides along with junk removal teams like Trash Daddy, Annie Haul, and Junk Vets. She goes backstage to a taping of Antiques Roadshow, and learns what makes for compelling junk-based television with the executive producer of Pawn Stars. And she even investigates the growing problem of space junk--23,000 pieces of manmade debris orbiting the planet at 17,500 MPH, threatening both satellites and human space exploration"-- Provided by publisher.
Green Library
ARTHIST-278S-01, HISTORY-7S-01
Book
xi, 363 pages ; 23 cm
  • Preface Introduction Part 1: Overview 1. Behind It All: The Big Idea 2. What are Interpretive Labels? 3. Types of Labels in Exhibitions Part 2: Considering the Audience 4. Who is the Audience (and What Do They Want)? 5. Audience Fragmentation 6. Selecting the Right Reading Level 7. The Number of Words 8. Multilingual Labels 9. Writing Visitor-Friendly Labels Chapter 10. The Label's Voice: Who is Talking to Me? Part 3: Exhancing the Visitor Experience 11.Hierarchies 12. Modalities 13. Making Words and Images Work Together 14. Labels That Ask Questions 15. Labels for Interactive Exhibits 16. Digital Interpretive Devices Part 4: Tasks 17. Getting Started (and Getting It Done) 18. Evaluation During Development 19. Typographic Design 20. Production and Fabrication 21. Evaluation After Opening Part 5: Conclusions 22. Findings from Research and Evaluation Bibliography Figure Credits Index About the Author.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781442249035 20160619
Beverly Serrell presents the reader with excellent guidelines on the process of exhibit label planning, writing, design, and production. One of the museum field's leading consultants and label writers, Serrell's 1996 edition of Exhibit Labels has been a standard in the field since its initial publication. This new edition not only provides expert guidance on the art of label writing for diverse audiences and explores the theoretical and interpretive considerations of placing labels within an exhibition, it also features all new case studies and photographs and thoughts about interpretation in digital media. Exhibit Labels: An Interpretive Approach is a vital reference tool for all museum professionals.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781442249035 20160619
Green Library
ARTHIST-278S-01, HISTORY-7S-01
Book
xvi, 155 pages : illustrations ; 26 cm
  • Defining museums (and museum studies)
  • The origins of museums
  • The museum system
  • Dimensions of museums
  • Species of museums? A museological bestiary
  • The meaningful physical resource
  • Museum workers
  • Museum users
  • Contemporary museums around the world
  • The future of museums.
Museums serve to help us understand the past and navigate our future-as individuals, as societies, and as a global community. A careful and accurate assessment of a museum's purpose is crucial to its ability to serve its users effectively. Foundations of Museum Studies: Evolving Systems of Knowledge offers a holistic introduction to museums and the study of them from the perspective of specialization in museum studies within the context of library and information science (LIS). The book strikes a balance between theory and practice, examining museums from a systems perspective that considers museums to be document-centered institutions-that objects are documents that generate and convey information, meaning, and inspiration. The authors utilize examples drawn from their experience with institutions in the United States that can be applied to museums across the world. Future museum professionals who read this book will have a broader perspective, an expanded skill set, and the adaptability to span the spectrum of traditional academic disciplines.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781610692823 20160617
Green Library
ARTHIST-278S-01, HISTORY-7S-01
Book
xxii, 1167 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Preface xi Introduction xv PART ONE: APPROACHES I Memory and Self-Observation: The Perpetuation of the Nineteenth Century 3 1 Visibility and Audibility 5 2 Treasuries of Memory and Knowledge 7 3 Observation, Description, Realism 17 4 Numbers 25 5 News 29 6 Photography 39 II Time: When Was the Nineteenth Century? 45 1 Chronology and the Coherence of the Age 45 2 Calendar and Periodization 49 3 Breaks and Transitions 52 4 The Age of Revolution, Victorianism, Fin de Siecle 58 5 Clocks and Acceleration 67 III Space: Where Was the Nineteenth Century? 77 1 Space and Time 77 2 Metageography: Naming Spaces 78 3 Mental Maps: The Relativity of Spatial Perspective 86 4 Spaces of Interaction: Land and Sea 94 5 Ordering and Governing Space 104 6 Territoriality, Diaspora, Borders 107 PART TWO: PANORAMAS IV Mobilities 117 1 Magnitudes and Tendencies 117 2 Population Disasters and the Demographic Transition 124 3 The Legacy of Early Modern Migrations: Creoles and Slaves 128 4 Penal Colony and Exile 133 5 Ethnic Cleansing 139 6 I nternal Migration and the Changing Slave Trade 144 7 Migration and Capitalism 154 8 Global Motives 164 V Living Standards: Risk and Security in Material Life 167 1 The Standard of Living and the Quality of Life 167 2 Life Expectancy and "Homo hygienicus" 170 3 Medical Fears and Prevention 178 4 Mobile Perils, Old and New 185 5 Natural Disasters 197 6 Famine 201 7 Agricultural Revolutions 211 8 Poverty and Wealth 216 9 Globalized Consumption 226 VI Cities: European Models and Worldwide Creativity 241 1 The City as Norm and Exception 241 2 Urbanization and Urban Systems 249 3 Between Deurbanization and Hypergrowth 256 4 Specialized Cities, Universal Cities 264 5 The Golden Age of Port Cities 275 6 Colonial Cities, Treaty Ports, Imperial Metropolises 283 7 Internal Spaces and Undergrounds 297 8 Symbolism, Aesthetics, Planning 311 VII Frontiers: Subjugation of Space and Challenges to Nomadic Life 322 1 Invasions and Frontier Processes 322 2 The North American West 331 3 South America and South Africa 347 4 Eurasia 356 5 Settler Colonialism 368 6 The Conquest of Nature: Invasions of the Biosphere 375 VIII Imperial Systems and Nation-States: The Persistence of Empires 392 1 Great-Power Politics and Imperial Expansion 392 2 Paths to the Nation-State 403 3 What Holds Empires Together? 419 4 Empires: Typology and Comparisons 429 5 Central and Marginal Cases 434 6 Pax Britannica 450 7 Living in Empires 461 IX International Orders, Wars, Transnational Movements: Between Two World Wars 469 1 The Thorny Path to a Global System of States 469 2 Spaces of Power and Hegemony 475 3 Peaceful Europe, Wartorn Asia and Africa 483 4 Diplomacy as Political Instrument and Intercultural Art 493 5 Internationalisms and the Emergence of Universal Norms 505 X Revolutions: From Philadelphia via Nanjing to Saint Petersburg 514 1 Revolutions--from Below, from Above, from Unexpected Directions 514 2 The Revolutionary Atlantic 522 3 The Great Turbulence in Midcentury 543 4 Eurasian Revolutions, Fin de Siecle 558 XI The State: Minimal Government, Performances, and the Iron Cage 572 1 Order and Communication: The State and the Political 572 2 Reinventions of Monarchy 579 3 Democracy 593 4 Bureaucracies 605 5 Mobilization and Discipline 616 6 Self-Strengthening: The Politics of Peripheral Defensive 625 7 State and Nationalism 629 PART THREE: THEMES XII Energy and Industry: Who Unbound Prometheus, When, and Where? 637 1 Industrialization 638 2 Energy Regimes: The Century of Coal 651 3 Paths of Economic Development and Nondevelopment 658 4 Capitalism 667 XIII Labor: The Physical Basis of Culture 673 1 The Weight of Rural Labor 675 2 Factory, Construction Site, Office 685 3 Toward Emancipation: Slaves, Serfs, Peasants 697 4 The Asymmetry of Wage Labor 706 XIV Networks: Extension, Density, Holes 710 1 Communications 712 2 Trade 724 3 Money and Finance 730 XV Hierarchies: The Vertical Dimension of Social Space 744 1 Is a Global Social History Possible? 744 2 Aristocracies in (Moderate) Decline 750 3 Bourgeois and Quasi-bourgeois 761 XVI Knowledge: Growth, Concentration, Distribution 779 1 World Languages 781 2 Literacy and Schooling 788 3 The University as a Cultural Export from Europe 798 4 Mobility and Translation 808 5 Humanities and the Study of the Other 814 XVII Civilization and Exclusion 826 1 The "Civilized World" and Its "Mission" 826 2 Slave Emancipation and White Supremacy 837 3 Antiforeignism and "Race War" 855 4 Anti-Semitism 865 XVIII Religion 873 1 Concepts of Religion and the Religious 873 2 Secularization 880 3 Religion and Empire 887 4 Reform and Renewal 894 Conclusion: The Nineteenth Century in History 902 1 Self-Diagnostics 902 2 Modernity 904 3 Again: The Beginning or End of a Century 906 4 Five Characteristics of the Century 907 Abbreviations 921 Notes 923 Bibliography 1021 Index 1119.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691147451 20160613
A monumental history of the nineteenth century, The Transformation of the World offers a panoramic and multifaceted portrait of a world in transition. Jurgen Osterhammel, an eminent scholar who has been called the Braudel of the nineteenth century, moves beyond conventional Eurocentric and chronological accounts of the era, presenting instead a truly global history of breathtaking scope and towering erudition. He examines the powerful and complex forces that drove global change during the "long nineteenth century, " taking readers from New York to New Delhi, from the Latin American revolutions to the Taiping Rebellion, from the perils and promise of Europe's transatlantic labor markets to the hardships endured by nomadic, tribal peoples across the planet. Osterhammel describes a world increasingly networked by the telegraph, the steamship, and the railways. He explores the changing relationship between human beings and nature, looks at the importance of cities, explains the role slavery and its abolition played in the emergence of new nations, challenges the widely held belief that the nineteenth century witnessed the triumph of the nation-state, and much more. This is the highly anticipated English edition of the spectacularly successful and critically acclaimed German book, which is also being translated into Chinese, Polish, Russian, and French. Indispensable for any historian, The Transformation of the World sheds important new light on this momentous epoch, showing how the nineteenth century paved the way for the global catastrophes of the twentieth century, yet how it also gave rise to pacifism, liberalism, the trade union, and a host of other crucial developments.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691147451 20160613
Green Library
ARTHIST-278S-01, HISTORY-7S-01
Book
xxiv, 389 p. : ill. ; 24 cm
  • Introduction Early Modern Things: Setting Objects in Motion, 1500-1800 Paula Findlen Part One: The Ambiguity of Things Chapter One: Surface Tension: Objectifying Ginseng in Chinese Early Modernity Carla Nappi Chapter Two: Going to the Birds: Animals as Things and Beings in Early Modernity Marcy Norton Chapter Three: The Restless Clock Jessica Riskin Part Two: Representing Things Chapter Four: "Stil-staende dingen": Picturing Objects in the Dutch Golden Age Julie Hochstrasser Chapter Five: "Things Seen and Unseen": The Material Culture of Early Modern Inventories and Their Representation of Domestic Interiors Giorgio Riello Chapter Six: Costume and Character in the Ottoman Empire: Dress as Social Agent in Nicolay's Navigations Chandra Mukerji Part Three: Making Things Chapter Seven: Making Things: Techniques and Books in Early Modern Europe Pamela H. Smith Chapter Eight: Capricious Demands: Artisanal Goods, Business Strategies, and Consumer Behavior in Seventeenth-Century Florence Corey Tazzara Part Four: Empires of Things Chapter Nine: Locating Rhubarb: Early Modern Russia's Relevant Obscurity Erika Monahan Chapter Ten: The World in a Shilling: Silver Coins and the Challenge of Political Economy in the Early Modern Atlantic World Mark A. Peterson Chapter Eleven: Anatolian Timber and Egyptian Grain: Things That Made the Ottoman Empire Alan Mikhail Part Five: Consuming Things Chapter Twelve: The Tokugawa Storehouse: Ieyasu's Encounters with Things Morgan Pitelka Chapter Thirteen: Porcelain for the Poor: The Material Culture of Tea and Coffee Consumption in Eighteenth-Century Amsterdam Anne E.C. McCants Chapter Fourteen: Fashioning Difference in Georgian England: Furniture For Himand For Her Amanda Vickery Epilogue: The Power of Things Denaturalizing Things: A Comment Renata Ago Something New: A Comment Timothy Brook Identities through Things: A Comment Erin K. Lichtenstein.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415520515 20160612
What can we learn about the past by studying things? How does the meaning of things, and our relationship to them, change over time? This fascinating collection taps a rich vein of recent scholarship to explore a variety of approaches to the material culture of the early modern world (c.1500-1800). Divided into six parts this book explores; the ambiguity of things, representing things, making things, empires of things, consuming things and lastly the power of things. Spanning across the early modern world, from Ming dynasty China to Georgian England, and from Ottoman Egypt to Spanish America, the authors provide a generous set of examples in how to study the circulation, use, consumption and, most fundamentally, the nature of things themselves. Drawing on a broad range of disciplinary perspectives and lavishly illustrated, Early Modern Things supplies fresh and provocative insights into how objects - ordinary and extraordinary, secular and sacred, natural and man-made - came to define some of the key developments of the early modern world. This book will be essential reading for all those interested in the early modern world.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415520515 20160612
Green Library
ARTHIST-278S-01, HISTORY-7S-01
Book
xiii, 145 pages : illustrations, maps ; 26 cm.
  • Preface: Wonderful museums and Quiccheberg's Inscriptiones / Bruce Robertson
  • Introduction / Mark A. Meadow
  • Biography of Samuel Quiccheberg / Heinrich Pantaleon
  • Preface to Quiccheberg manuscript / Leo Quiccheberg
  • Inscriptions; or, Titles of the most ample theater / Samuel Quiccheberg.
This is a new translation of Quiccheberg's seminal 16th century text on the collection and display of objects. Samuel Quiccheberg's Inscriptiones, first published in Latin in 1565, is an ambitious effort to demonstrate the pragmatic value of curiosity cabinets, or Wunderkammer, to princely collectors in 16th-century Europe and, by so doing, inspire them to develop their own such collections. Quiccheberg shows how the assembly and display of physical objects offered nobles a powerful means to expand visual knowledge, allowing them to incorporate empirical and artisanal expertise into the realm of the written word. Quiccheberg's descriptions of early modern collections provide both a point of origin for today's museums and an implicit critique of their aims, asserting the fundamental research and scholarly value of collections: collections are to be used, not merely viewed. The First Treatise on Museums makes Quiccheberg's now rare publication available in English translation. Complementing the translation are a critical introduction by Mark Meadow and a preface by Bruce Robertson.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781606061497 20160613
Green Library
ARTHIST-278S-01, HISTORY-7S-01
Book
262 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction: Thinking about Museums Chapter 1. Do Museums Still Need Objects? Chapter 2.Whose Objects? Whose Culture? The Contexts of Repatriation Chapter 3. Where Is the East? Chapter 4. Where Have All the Grown-Ups Gone? Chapter 5. The Birth and the Death of a Museum Chapter 6. Museums, Public Space, and Civic Identity Notes Index Acknowledgments.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812241907 20160528
"We live in a museum age, " writes Steven Conn in Do Museums Still Need Objects? And indeed, at the turn of the twenty-first century, more people are visiting museums than ever before. There are now over 17,500 accredited museums in the United States, averaging approximately 865 million visits a year, more than two million visits a day. New museums have proliferated across the cultural landscape even as older ones have undergone transformational additions: from the Museum of Modern Art and the Morgan in New York to the High in Atlanta and the Getty in Los Angeles. If the golden age of museum-building came a century ago, when the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the American Museum of Natural History, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Field Museum of Natural History, and others were created, then it is fair to say that in the last generation we have witnessed a second golden age. By closely observing the cultural, intellectual, and political roles that museums play in contemporary society, while also delving deeply into their institutional histories, historian Steven Conn demonstrates that museums are no longer seen simply as houses for collections of objects. Conn ranges across a wide variety of museum types-from art and anthropology to science and commercial museums-asking questions about the relationship between museums and knowledge, about the connection between culture and politics, about the role of museums in representing non-Western societies, and about public institutions and the changing nature of their constituencies. Elegantly written and deeply researched, Do Museums Still Need Objects? is essential reading for historians, museum professionals, and those who love to visit museums.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812241907 20160528
Green Library
ARTHIST-278S-01, HISTORY-7S-01
Book
xii, 616 p. ; 25 cm.
Americans and people throughout the world have become increasingly dependent on Americas great research universities. Yet few of us truly understand to what we owe this extraordinary excellence or what we must do to keep it. From the development of technologies like the laser, the global positioning system, the MRI, radar, and even Viagra, to predicting weather patterns, American research universities are one of our most vital sources of economic growth and social welfare. They have flourished because of a system that has invested public tax dollars in their work and, more importantly, granted substantial autonomy to funding agencies and the universities. This system is now under attack, the universitys preeminence endangered by the USA PATRIOT Act and other conservative policies. This revelatory and alarming book will show how this vital institution is at risk of tragically losing its dominant status and why a threat to the university is a threat to the health and wealth of our nation.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781586484088 20160528
Green Library
ARTHIST-278S-01, HISTORY-7S-01
Book
x, 386 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 29 cm.
  • The museum adumbrated : some models and precursors
  • The cabinet of curiosities : concept and realization
  • Collecting art
  • Museums and the natural world
  • Death, anatomy and the museum
  • Antiquity in transition
  • Museums of science and technology
  • The museum comes of age.
This fascinating and unique book offers a history of museum collecting in western Europe over the course of its formative centuries, tracing its origins from the culture of collecting that emerged during the Renaissance, which served the purposes of both prestige and academic enquiry, and concluding with the great changes of the nineteenth century which would prove so influential to the museum movement of later years. Taking into account both individual collectors and public institutions, Arthur MacGregor covers topics such as the methods by which materials from both the manmade and natural world were selected and displayed, problems of preservation and presentation, the specialization of individual areas, such as fine arts, antiquities or natural history, as well as the developments of the nineteenth century which brought such collections within the reach of a much wider public. With the aid of 200 images, this book offers for the first time a wide-ranging survey of this entire process as well as the changing preoccupations of collectors, all set within a broader social context.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780300124934 20160527
Green Library
ARTHIST-278S-01, HISTORY-7S-01
Book
vii, 312 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
  • An American cabinet of curiosities : Thomas Jefferson's "Indian Hall" at Monticello / Joyce Henri Robinson
  • "And a little child shall lead them" : American children's cabinets of curiosities / Shirley Teresa Wajda
  • Dreaming in commerce : advertising trade card scrapbooks / Ellen Gruber Garvey
  • Collecting the nation : visions of nationalism in two Civil War-era photograph albums / Andrea L. Volpe
  • The curious cabinet of Dr. Morton / Ann Fabian
  • Collecting Mr. Ayer's narrative / Carolyn Kastner
  • En/gendering the Whitney's collection of American art / Evelyn C. Hankins
  • Small mercies : Colleen Moore's doll house and the National Charity Tour / Leslie Paris
  • Tradition and the individual memory : the case of Christian C. Sanderson / Teresa Barnett
  • All buy our selves at household auctions / Lisa A. Long
  • American icons : photographs / by Carrie Mae Weems
  • Exhibiting Nazi artifacts and challenging traditional museum culture : a conversation with Mitchell Wolfson, Jr. / Gregory Maertz
  • The serial killer as collector / Sara Knox.
The success of internet auction sites like e-Bay and the cult status of public television's Antiques Roadshow attest to the continued popularity of collecting in American culture. The thriving market for mass-produced collectibles confirms that consumption patterns are imbued with layers of cultural significance-meanings largely determined within the realm of the marketplace. Acts of Possession investigates the ways cultural meanings of collections have evolved and yet remained surprisingly unchanged throughout American history. Drawing upon the body of theoretical work on collecting, the contributors investigate how, what, and why Americans have collected and why they are attracted to certain objects, exploring the inherent meanings behind systems of organization and display. Essays consider the meanings of Thomas Jefferson's Indian Hall at Monticello; the pedagogical theories behind nineteenth-century children's cabinets of curiosities; collections of Native American artifacts; and the ability of the owners of dollhouses to construct meaning within the context of Victorian ideals of domesticity. The authors also consider some darker aspects of collecting-hoarding, fetishism, and compulsive behavior-scrutinizing collections of racist memorabilia and fascist propaganda. The final essay posits the serial killer as a collector, an investigation into the dangerous objectification of humans themselves. Focusing on individual as opposed to museum collections, the contributors employ the methodology of several disciplines, including American studies, history, art history, and museum studies.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813532714 20160528
Green Library
ARTHIST-278S-01, HISTORY-7S-01
Book
xiv, 273 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Green Library
ARTHIST-278S-01, HISTORY-7S-01
Book
viii, 305 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Acknowledgments 1: Museums and the Late Victorian World 2: "Naked Eye Science": Museums and Natural History 3: Between Science and Art: Museums and the Development of Anthropology 4: The Philadelphia Commercial Museum: A Museum to Conquer the World 5: Objects and American History: The Museums of Henry Mercer and Henry Ford 6: From South Kensington to the Louvre: Art Museums and the Creation of Fine Art 7: 1926: Of Fairs, Museums, and History Notes Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226114927 20160528
During the last half of the 19th century, Americans built many of the country's most celebrated museums, such as the American Museum of Natural History in New York, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and Chicago's Field Museum. This text argues that Americans built these institutions with the confidence that they could collect, organize, and display the sum of the world's knowledge. Examining various kinds of museums, the author discovers how museums gave definition to different bodies of knowledge and how they presented that knowledge - the world in miniature - to the visiting public. The study includes familiar places like the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Academy of Natural Sciences, but also draws attention to forgotten ones, like the Philadelphia Commercial Museum, once the repository for objects from many turn-of-the-century world's fairs. What emerges from the analysis is that museums of all kinds shared a belief that knowledge resided in the objects themselves. Using what Steven Conn has termed an "object-based epistemology, " museums of the late 19th century were on the cutting edge of American intellectual life. By the first quarter of the 20th century, however, museums had largely been replaced by research-oriented universities as places where new knowledge was produced. According to Conn, not only did this mean a change in the way knowledge was conceived, but also, and perhaps more importantly, who would have access to it.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226114927 20160528
Green Library, Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-278S-01, HISTORY-7S-01
Book
408 p. : ill., map ; 24 cm.
When culture makes itself at home in motion, where does an anthropologist stand? This collection of works aims to be a moving picture of a world that doesn't stand still, that reveals itself in airport lounges and car parks. Travel and its difficult companion, translation, are taken as openings into a complex modernity. The author contemplates a world ever more connected, yet not homogeneous, expanding across colonization, capitalist expansion, immigration, labour mobility and tourism. The author's concerns are with struggles to displace stereotypes, to recognize divergent histories, and to sustain "postcolonial" and "tribal" identities in contexts of domination and globalization.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674779600 20160527
Green Library
ARTHIST-278S-01, HISTORY-7S-01
Book
178 p.
The material conditions in which the production and consumption of art takes place is a topic of increasing importance in art history. This title studies art as an industry and a public practice, looking at how nations, institutions and private individuals present art to the community and how art museums are shaped by cultural, social and political determinants.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415070119 20160527
Green Library
ARTHIST-278S-01, HISTORY-7S-01
Book
163 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 23 cm.
Green Library
ARTHIST-278S-01, HISTORY-7S-01
Book
xiv, 440 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • List of Plates List of figures Acknowledgements Preface Part One: Collecting Processes Part Two: Collecting in Practice Part Three: Collecting Poetics Part Four: The Politics of Collecting Part Five: Collecting in the European Tradition Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415075602 20160527
About one in three people in North America and Europe collects something. Collecting is clearly an important social phenomenon and yet surprisingly little is known about how and why we collect. On Collecting explores the nature of collecting both in Europe and among people living within the European tradition and elsewhere. The way people collect tells us about their notions of themselves and others, about their relationship to objects, and helps us understand people as consumers. Susan Pearce addresses many of the important issues surrounding the practice of collecting. She considers how European collecting practice is part of an essentially European mentality, how collected objects have cultural value and how the individuals who collect them help to affect the society they live in. This book breaks new ground in its analysis of our relationship to the material world. It will be of value to museam professionals and students, cultural historians and anyone interested in the phenomenon of collecting.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415075602 20160527
Green Library
ARTHIST-278S-01, HISTORY-7S-01
Book
xi, 295 p., [12] p. of plates : ill. ; 25 cm.
From rare books, valuable sculpture and paintings, the relics of saints, porcelain and other objets d'art, to stamps, textiles, military ribbons and shells, an amazing variety of objects have engaged and even obsessed collectors through the ages. This is a psychological examination of the emotional sources of the never-ending longing for yet another collectible. The author discusses the eccentricities of heads of state, literary figures, artists and psychoanalytic patients, all possessed by a need for relief from despair and helplessness. The central part of the work explores in detail the personal circumstances and life history of three individuals: a contemporary collector, Martin G., the celebrated British book and manuscript collector Sir Thomas Phillipps, who wanted one copy of every book in the world, and the great French novelist Honore de Balzac, a compulsive collector of bric-a-brac.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691033617 20160528
Green Library
ARTHIST-278S-01, HISTORY-7S-01
Book
348 p. ; 26 cm.
  • The collection - between the visible and the invisible-- the age of curiosity-- collections in Venetia in the heyday of curiosity-- medals/shells-- erudition/philosophy-- dealers, connoisseurs and enthusiasts in 18th-century Paris-- Maffei and Caylus-- collectors, naturalists and antiquarians in the Venetia Republic of the 18th century-- private collections, public museums.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780745606804 20160527
This study examines the history of collecting in early modern Europe, and describes the myriad treasures, from paintings and antiques to religious relics, that found their way into the private collections and public museums of the time. The author looks at the types of people who formed collections, from the harmless eccentrics to the wily speculators, and examines what they collected and why. He develops an historical anthropology of collecting and sheds new light upon the genesis of the modern museum. Pomian charts the changes in fashion which characterized the world of collecting, arguing that such shifts can be seen as a sign of wider and more profound changes in mentality and can be analyzed in terms of a conflict between aesthetic and historical sensibilities.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780745606804 20160527
Green Library
ARTHIST-278S-01, HISTORY-7S-01
Green Library, SAL3 (off-campus storage)
ARTHIST-278S-01, HISTORY-7S-01