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Book
xv, 692 pages : illustrations, maps ; 25 cm.
  • Introduction
  • California Indians before 1846
  • Prelude to genocide : March 1846-March 1848
  • Gold, immigrants, and killers from Oregon : March 1848-May 1850
  • Turning point : the killing campaigns of December 1849-May 1850
  • Legislating exclusion and vulnerability : 1846-1853
  • Rise of the killing machine : militias and vigilantes, April 1850-December 1854
  • Perfecting the killing machine : December 1854-March 1861
  • The Civil War in California and its aftermath : March 1861-1871
  • Conclusion
  • Appendixes. 1: Reports of nonspecific numbers of California Indians killed, 1846-1873 ; 2: Reports of fewer than five California Indians killed, 1846-1873 ; 3: Reports of five or more California Indians killed, 1846-1873 ; 4: Reports of non-Indians killed by California Indians, 1846-1873 ; 5: Selected massacres with contested death tolls, 1846-1866 ; 6: Major volunteer California state militia expeditions, 1850-1861 ; 7: Reports of California Indians killed by US army soldiers and their auxiliaries, 1846-1873 ; 8: The United Nations Genocide Convention.
The first full account of the government-sanctioned genocide of California Indians under United States rule Between 1846 and 1873, California's Indian population plunged from perhaps 150,000 to 30,000. Benjamin Madley is the first historian to uncover the full extent of the slaughter, the involvement of state and federal officials, the taxpayer dollars that supported the violence, indigenous resistance, who did the killing, and why the killings ended. This deeply researched book is a comprehensive and chilling history of an American genocide. Madley describes pre-contact California and precursors to the genocide before explaining how the Gold Rush stirred vigilante violence against California Indians. He narrates the rise of a state-sanctioned killing machine and the broad societal, judicial, and political support for genocide. Many participated: vigilantes, volunteer state militiamen, U.S. Army soldiers, U.S. congressmen, California governors, and others. The state and federal governments spent at least $1,700,000 on campaigns against California Indians. Besides evaluating government officials' culpability, Madley considers why the slaughter constituted genocide and how other possible genocides within and beyond the Americas might be investigated using the methods presented in this groundbreaking book.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780300181364 20161128
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-211-01
Book
vi, 412 pages : illustrations ; 26 cm
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-211-01
Book
504 pages, 24 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations (some color), maps ; 26 cm.
  • Mallorca
  • New Spain
  • Baja California
  • San Diego and Monterey
  • Journey to Mexico City
  • Return to Carmel
  • Serra-Rivera correspondence
  • San Diego
  • A series of setbacks
  • Mission among the Chumash
  • Final years.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-211-01
Book
xii, 256 pages : illustrations, maps ; 23 cm
  • List of Maps and Figures Acknowledgments Introduction: Saints and Indigenous Citizens 1. Colonial Settlements on Indigenous Land 2. Becoming Indian in Colonial California 3. The Politics of the Image 4. "All the Horses Are in the Possession of the Indians": The Chumash War 5. "We Solicit Our Freedom": Citizenship and the Patria 6. Indigenous Landowners and Native Ingenuity on the Borderlands of Northern Mexico Conclusion: Indigenous Archives and Knowledge Appendix Notes Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520276468 20160612
Saints and Citizens is a bold new excavation of the history of Indigenous people in California in the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, showing how the missions became sites of their authority, memory, and identity. Shining a forensic eye on colonial encounters in Chumash, Luiseno, and Yokuts territories, Lisbeth Haas depicts how native painters incorporated their cultural iconography in mission painting and how leaders harnessed new knowledge for control in other ways. Through her portrayal of highly varied societies, she explores the politics of Indigenous citizenship in the independent Mexican nation through events such as the Chumash War of 1824, native emancipation after 1826, and the political pursuit of Indigenous rights and land through 1848.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520276468 20160612
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-211-01
Book
xx, 217 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-211-01

6. The orenda [2013]

Book
490 pages : maps ; 24 cm
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-211-01
Book
408 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
In the period between 1150 and 1550, an increasing number of Christians in western Europe made pilgrimage to places where material objects--among them paintings, statues, relics, pieces of wood, earth, stones, and Eucharistic wafers--allegedly erupted into life by such activities as bleeding, weeping, and walking about. Challenging Christians both to seek ever more frequent encounter with miraculous matter and to turn to an inward piety that rejected material objects of devotion, such phenomena were by the fifteenth century at the heart of religious practice and polemic. In Christian Materiality, Caroline Walker Bynum describes the miracles themselves, discusses the problems they presented for both church authorities and the ordinary faithful, and probes the basic scientific and religious assumptions about matter that lay behind them. She also analyzes the proliferation of religious art in the later Middle Ages and argues that it called attention to its materiality in sophisticated ways that explain both the animation of images and the hostility to them on the part of iconoclasts. Seeing the Christian culture of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries as a paradoxical affirmation of the glory and the threat of the natural world, Bynum's study suggests a new understanding of the background to the sixteenth-century reformations, both Protestant and Catholic. Moving beyond cultural study of "the body"--a field she helped to establish--Bynum argues that Western attitudes toward body and person must be placed in the context of changing conceptions of matter itself. Her study has broad theoretical implications, suggesting a new approach to the study of material culture and religious practice.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781935408109 20160605
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-211-01
Book
273 p. : ill. (some col.), col. maps ; 29 cm.
This title presents a superbly illustrated and discerning exploration of the history, heritage, and future of California's Missions. Combining an engaging narrative with historical paintings, archival photographs, and recent full-colour photography, this volume presents readers with a fascinating overview of these iconic institutions. Beginning with an authoritative look at their founding and early history, "The California Missions" then goes on to examine their rediscovery in the late nineteenth century, and the beginnings of the mission restoration movement. Further chapters offer an insight into mission architecture and wall murals, an extensive survey of the rich holdings of European and Native American art in mission collections, and an examination of the challenges involved in preserving their heritage for future generations. This volume also features a concise historical profile for each of the twenty-one missions in California.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780892369836 20160528
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-211-01
Book
xiv, 255 p. : ill., ports. ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction 1. Precolonial Stories/Precolonial Histories-- 2. Stories of Settler-Colonizers, and of the Colonized-- Source Break: Bear Flag Narratives-- 3. The Bear Flag Incident-- 4. Stories and Histories of Women and Violence in the Colonial North - Source Break: The White Mind-- 5. Mobilizing Linear Narratives - Source Break: Civilized Man-- 6. Raced Bodies in White Spaces Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780292716346 20160528
The territory of Napa County, California, contains more than grapevines. The deepest roots belong to Wappo-speaking peoples, a group whose history has since been buried by the stories of Spanish colonizers, Californios (today's Latinos), African Americans, Chinese immigrants, and Euro Americans. Napa's history clearly is one of co-existence; yet, its schoolbooks tell a linear story that climaxes with the arrival of Euro Americans. In "This Land was Mexican Once", Linda Heidenreich excavates Napa's subaltern voices and histories to tell a complex, textured local history with important implications for the larger American West, as well. Heidenreich is part of a new generation of scholars who are challenging not only the old, Euro-American depiction of California, but also the linear method of historical storytelling - a method that inevitably favours the last man writing.She first maps the overlapping histories that comprise Napa's past, then examines how the current version came to dominate - or even erase - earlier events. So while history, in Heidenreich's words, may be 'the stuff of nation-building', it can also be 'the stuff of resistance'. Chapters are interspersed with 'source breaks' - raw primary sources that speak for themselves and interrupt the linear, Euro-American telling of Napa's history. Such an inclusive approach inherently acknowledges the connections Napa's peoples have to the rest of the region, for the linear history that marginalizes minorities is not unique to Napa. Latinos, for instance, have populated the American West for centuries, and are still shaping its future. In the end, "This Land was Mexican Once" is more than the story of Napa, it is a multidimensional model for reflecting a multicultural past.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780292716346 20160528
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-211-01
Book
353 p. : ill. ; 27 cm.
  • Introduction 1. The "Jesuit Style" 2. Rhetoric versus Propaganda 3. The Propagandist 4. Message 5. Diffusion Postscript from Berlin Acknowledgments Notes Bibliography List of Illustrations Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520233577 20160528
In this provocative revisionist work, Evonne Levy brings fresh theoretical perspectives to the study of the 'propagandistic' art and architecture of the Jesuit order as exemplified by its late Baroque Roman church interiors. The first extensive analysis of the aims, mechanisms, and effects of Jesuit art and architecture, this original and sophisticated study also evaluates how the term 'propaganda' functions in art history, distinguishes it from rhetoric, and proposes a precise use of the term for the visual arts for the first time. Levy begins by looking at Nazi architecture as a gateway to the emotional and ethical issues raised by the term 'propaganda'. Jesuit art once stirred similar passions, as she shows in a discussion of the controversial nineteenth-century rubric the 'Jesuit Style'. She then considers three central aspects of Jesuit art as essential components of propaganda: authorship, message, and diffusion. Levy tests her theoretical formulations against a broad range of documents and works of art, including the Chapel of St. Ignatius and other major works in Rome by Andrea Pozzo as well as chapels in Central Europe and Poland. Innovative in bringing a broad range of social and critical theory to bear on Baroque art and architecture in Europe and beyond, Levy's work highlights the subject-forming capacity of early modern Catholic art and architecture while establishing "propaganda" as a productive term for art history.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520233577 20160528
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-211-01
Book
xii, 310 p., [80] p. of plates : ill. ; 26 cm.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-211-01
Book
165 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-211-01
Book
xiii, 202 p., [8] p. of plates : ill. ; 24 cm.
Green Library, Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-211-01
Journal/Periodical
v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Green Library, Art & Architecture Library (Bowes), SAL3 (off-campus storage)
ARTHIST-211-01