Search results

RSS feed for this result

11 results

Book
282 pages : illustrations, plan ; 29 cm.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-209C/409-01
Book
xvi, 579 pages : illustrations ; 29 cm.
"An analytical history of the Hellenistic, Roman, Byzantine, Umayyad, and Early Abbasid mosaics in the Holy Land from the second century B.C.E to eighth century C.E"--Provided by publisher.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-209C/409-01
Book
xiv, 302 p. : ill ; 26 cm.
  • First things. Introduction
  • The reliquary and its maker
  • Relics, meaning, and response : early Christian reliquaries, narrative and not
  • Shaped reliquaries. Spolia and sign, metaphor and simile
  • The reliquary cross
  • Like and unlike metaphors
  • Body-part reliquaries : heads
  • Body part reliquaries : other body parts
  • A gathering of saints : processions and treasuries. Reliquaries in action
  • Treasuries
  • Relic display
  • A case study : Wibald of Stavelot as patron
  • The impact of 1204, the "space" of the ark, and conclusion.
"A study of reliquaries as a form of representation in medieval art. Explores how reliquaries stage the importance and meaning of relics using a wide range of artistic means from material and ornament to metaphor and symbolism"--Provided by publisher.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes), SAL3 (off-campus storage)
ARTHIST-209C/409-01
Book
p. cm.
  • Introduction Chapter One: Art, Icons, and Their Critics and Defenders Before the Age of Iconoclasm Chapter Two: Byzantine Iconoclasm in the Eighth Century Chapter Three: Art and Art Talk in the West in the First Age of Iconoclasm Chapter Four: The Franks and Nicaea: Opus Caroli Regis Chapter Five: Tradition, Order, and Worship in the Age of Charlemagne Chapter Six: The Age of Second Iconoclasm Chapter Seven: Art and Argument in the Age of Louis the Pious Conclusion Notes Bibliography Index Acknowledgments.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812241419 20160528
In the year 726 C.E., the Byzantine emperor Leo III issued an edict declaring images to be idols, forbidden by Exodus, and ordering all such images in churches to be destroyed. Thus was set off the first wave of Byzantine iconoclasm, which ran its violent course until 787, when the underlying issues were temporarily resolved at the Second Council of Nicaea. In 815, a second great wave of iconoclasm was set off, only to end in 842 when the icons were restored to the churches of the East and the iconoclasts excommunicated. The iconoclast controversies have long been understood as marking major fissures between the Western and Eastern churches. In Images, Iconoclasm, and the Carolingians, Thomas F. X. Noble reveals that the lines of division were not so clear. It is traditionally maintained that the Carolingians in the 790s did not understand the basic issues involved in the Byzantine dispute. Noble contends that there was, in fact, a significant Carolingian controversy about visual art and, if its ties to Byzantine iconoclasm were tenuous, they were also complex and deeply rooted in central concerns of the Carolingian court. Furthermore, he asserts that the Carolingians made distinctive and original contributions to the whole debate over religious art. Images, Iconoclasm, and the Carolingians is the first book to provide a comprehensive study of the Western response to Byzantine iconoclasm. By comparing art-texts with laws, letters, poems, and other sources, Noble reveals the power and magnitude of the key discourses of the Carolingian world during its most dynamic and creative decades.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812241419 20160528
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-209C/409-01
Book
1 v. (various pagings) : ill. ; 25 cm.
  • Sacred image, sacred power-- Icons and icon piety in early Byzantium-- Ruminations on edible icons - originals and copies in the art of Byzantium-- Graceland as locus sanctus-- Byzantine pilgrim's art-- Early Byzantine pilgrimage devotionalia as evidence for the appearance of pilgrimage shrines-- Pilgrims in magi's clothing - the impact of mimesis on early Byzantine pilgrimage art-- "Guided by land and sea" - pilgrim art and pilgrim travel in early Byzantium-- Art, medicine and magic in early Byzantium-- Art and marriage in early Byzantium-- Two Byzantine amuletic armbands and the group to which they belong-- Two unpublished pilgrim tokens in the Benaki Museum and the group to which they belong-- Early Christian and Byzantine rings - the Zucker family collection-- The Trier ivory, adventus ceremonial and the relics of St Stephen-- Meaning in Coptic funerary sculpture.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780860789345 20160527
In these studies Gary Vikan has opened new perspectives on the daily life and material culture of Late Antiquity - more specifically, on icons and relics and on objects revealing of the world of pilgrimage, the early cult of saints and marriage. He contextualizes these familiar categories of object in the patterns of belief and ritual extracted from contemporary texts and the objects themselves, in order to understand their meaning within the everyday lives of those by whom and for whom they were made. The studies give a nuanced delineation of the inherently ambiguous boundary between conventional religion and magic, noting repeatedly those instances wherein the two are invoked in the same breath (and by way of the same art object), toward the same end. From this historically constructed matrix of art, belief and ritual, the author derives an anthropologically defined paradigm of charisma and pilgrimage (applied in one essay, as an intriguing parallel, to deconstructing the world of a contemporary secular "saint", Elvis Presley).
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780860789345 20160527
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-209C/409-01
Book
207 p. : ill. ; 27 cm.
  • Introduction 7 1. Matter and Memory 13 2. Icon and Idol 39 3. Truth and Economy 61 4. Figure and Sign 83 5. Form and Likeness 107 6. Word and Image 125 Conclusion 138 Abbreviations 140 Notes 141 Bibliography 175 Acknowledgments 201 Index 203 Photography Credits 207.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691091778 20160528
"Figure and Likeness" presents a thought-provoking new account of Byzantine iconoclasm - the fundamental crisis in Christian visual representation during the eighth and ninth centuries that defined the terms of Christianity's relationship to the painted image. Charles Barber rejects the conventional means of analyzing this crisis, which seeks its origin in political and other social factors. Instead, he argues, iconoclasm is primarily a matter of theology and aesthetic theory. Working between the theological texts and the visual materials, Barber demonstrates that in challenging the validity of iconic representation, iconoclasts were asking: how can an image depict an incomprehensible God? In response, iconophile theologians gradually developed a notion of representation that distinguished the work of art from the subject it depicted. As such, Barber concludes, they were forced to move the language describing the icon beyond that of theology. This pivotal step allowed these theologians, of whom Patriarch Nikephoros and Theodore of Stoudios were the most important, to define and defend a specifically Christian art. In highlighting this outcome and also in offering a full and clearly rendered account of iconoclastic notions of Christian representation, Barber reveals that the notion of art was indeed central to the unfolding of iconoclasm. The implications of this study reach well beyond the dispute it considers. Barber fundamentally revises not only our understanding of Byzantine art in the years succeeding the iconoclastic dispute, but also of Christian painting in the centuries to come.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691091778 20160528
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-209C/409-01
Book
216 p., [74] p. of plates : ill. (some col.), facsims., plan ; 29 cm.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-209C/409-01
Book
xv, 323 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
Among the first works of art produced after Iconoclasm was defeated in 843, the Byzantine Marginal Psalters provide a rare glimpse into the world of scholarship and religious and political debate that occupied some of the leading intellectuals in Constantinople. The manuscripts are best known for their depictions of the heroes and villains of the Iconoclastic controversy: Iconoclasts whitewashing the icons of Christ, and Iconophiles triumphing over defeated Iconoclasts. But these psalters contain hundreds of marginal images - some literal, some typological - most of which have no apparent relationship to Iconoclasm. These have been the most difficult images to interpret. If not Iconophile polemics, what motivated the artists or their patrons in the choice of illustrations? The purpose of this book is to show that the marginal psalters are indeed polemical, but their stance is not simply anti-Iconoclastic. Image after image seems directed towards defining and defending the Orthodox position, not only on the question of images, but on most of the essential points of Orthodox Christian dogma. And the opponents being refuted are not just Iconoclasts, but Jews and Muslims as well. After Iconoclasm ended, those who had been the most avid defenders of the images now used these images to defend Orthodoxy and condemn its enemies.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521400503 20160528
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes), SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
ARTHIST-209C/409-01
Book
xviii, 263 p., [68] p. of plates : ill. ; 29 cm.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-209C/409-01
Book
xiv, [10], 215 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-209C/409-01
Book
2 v. ill. 25.
  • V. 1. Introduction et texte grec
  • v. 2. Traduction et commentaire. Vie grecque de sainte Marthe, mère de S. Syméon. Indices.
Green Library, Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-209C/409-01