Book
xvii, 198 pages : illustrations, maps ; 27 cm.
  • Acknowledgements Preface on Sources List of Illustrations Chapter 1. Introduction Chapter 2. The earliest mosque in Jerusalem Chapter 3. The problem of "Arculf" and the earliest mosque in Jerusalem Chapter 4. The Dome of the Chain Chapter 5. Columns and eagle capitals in the Dome of the Rock Chapter 6. Conclusion Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9789004301764 20160619
In "Perspectives on Early Islamic Art in Jerusalem, " Lawrence Nees analyzes early Islamic monuments on the "Haram al-Sharif, " or the Temple Mount: the Dome of the Chain, and the capitals with figures of eagles in the Dome of the Rock.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789004301764 20160619
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-209C/409-01
Book
414 pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 28 cm
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-209C/409-01
Book
xvi, 579 pages : illustrations ; 29 cm.
"An analytical history of the Hellenistic, Roman, Byzantine, Umayyad, and Early Abbasid mosaics in the Holy Land from the second century B.C.E to eighth century C.E"--Provided by publisher.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-209C/409-01
Book
xvii, 332 p. : ill. (chiefly col.), col. maps ; 32 cm.
This groundbreaking volume explores the epochal transformations and unexpected continuities in the Byzantine Empire from the seventh to the ninth century. As the period opened, the Empire's southern provinces-the vibrant, diverse areas of North Africa and the eastern Mediterranean-were at the crossroads of trade routes reaching from Spain to China. These regions experienced historic upheavals when their Christian and Jewish communities encountered the emerging Islamic world, and by the ninth century, an unprecedented cross-fertilization of cultures had taken place. This extraordinary age is brought vividly to life by leading international scholars, their writings accompanied by sumptuous illustrations of the period's most notable arts and artifacts. Resplendent images of authority, religion, and trade-embodied in precious metals, brilliant textiles, fine ivories, elaborate mosaics, manuscripts, and icons, many of them never before published-highlight the dynamic dialogue between the rich array of Byzantine styles and the evolving Islamic aesthetic. With its masterful exploration of two centuries that would shape the emerging medieval world, Byzantium and Islam provides a revelatory interpretation of a period with profound ramifications for the modern era.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780300179507 20160609
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-209C/409-01
Book
xiv, 327 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 26 cm.
  • Imprinted images : eulogiai, magic, and incense
  • Icons of sound : Hagia Sophia and the Byzantine choros
  • Eeikon and identity : the rise of the relief icon in iconophile thought
  • The imprint of life : enamel in Byzantium
  • Transformative vision : allegory, poikilia, and pathema
  • The icon's circular poetics : the charis of choros
  • Inspirited icons, animated statues, and Komnenian iconoclasm
  • Epilogue: the future of the past
  • Appendix 1. The icons in the monastic inventories of the eleventh and twelfth centuries
  • Appendix 2. Byzantine enamel icons and the West, eleventh-twelfth centuries.
"Explores the Byzantine aesthetic of fugitive appearances by placing and filming art objects in spaces of changing light, and by uncovering the shifting appearances expressed in poetry, descriptions of art, and liturgical performance"--Provided by publisher.
Green Library, Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-209C/409-01
Book
p. cm.
  • Introduction Chapter One: Art, Icons, and Their Critics and Defenders Before the Age of Iconoclasm Chapter Two: Byzantine Iconoclasm in the Eighth Century Chapter Three: Art and Art Talk in the West in the First Age of Iconoclasm Chapter Four: The Franks and Nicaea: Opus Caroli Regis Chapter Five: Tradition, Order, and Worship in the Age of Charlemagne Chapter Six: The Age of Second Iconoclasm Chapter Seven: Art and Argument in the Age of Louis the Pious Conclusion Notes Bibliography Index Acknowledgments.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812241419 20160528
In the year 726 C.E., the Byzantine emperor Leo III issued an edict declaring images to be idols, forbidden by Exodus, and ordering all such images in churches to be destroyed. Thus was set off the first wave of Byzantine iconoclasm, which ran its violent course until 787, when the underlying issues were temporarily resolved at the Second Council of Nicaea. In 815, a second great wave of iconoclasm was set off, only to end in 842 when the icons were restored to the churches of the East and the iconoclasts excommunicated. The iconoclast controversies have long been understood as marking major fissures between the Western and Eastern churches. In Images, Iconoclasm, and the Carolingians, Thomas F. X. Noble reveals that the lines of division were not so clear. It is traditionally maintained that the Carolingians in the 790s did not understand the basic issues involved in the Byzantine dispute. Noble contends that there was, in fact, a significant Carolingian controversy about visual art and, if its ties to Byzantine iconoclasm were tenuous, they were also complex and deeply rooted in central concerns of the Carolingian court. Furthermore, he asserts that the Carolingians made distinctive and original contributions to the whole debate over religious art. Images, Iconoclasm, and the Carolingians is the first book to provide a comprehensive study of the Western response to Byzantine iconoclasm. By comparing art-texts with laws, letters, poems, and other sources, Noble reveals the power and magnitude of the key discourses of the Carolingian world during its most dynamic and creative decades.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812241419 20160528
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-209C/409-01
Book
xvi, 345 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
  • Foreword-- The early Middle Ages: Europe's long morning, Jennifer R. Davies and Michael McCormick-- Part 1-- Discovering the Early Medieval Economy: Rethinking the structure of the early medieval economy, Chris Wickham-- Strong rulers - weak economy? Rome, the Carolinians, and the archaeology of slavery in the 1st millennium AD, Joachim Henning-- The beginnings of hilltop villages in early medieval Tuscany, Riccardo Francovich-- Molecular Middle Ages: early medieval economic history in the 21st century, Michael McCormick-- The early medieval economy: data, production, exchange, and demand, Angeliki E. Laiou-- Part 2-- Sounding Early Medieval Holiness: Latin hagiography before the 9th century: a synoptic view, Guy Philippart with Michel Trigalet-- Donationes pro anima: gift and countergift in the early medieval liturgy, Arnold Angenendt-- The early medieval transformation of piety, Thomas Head-- Part 3-- Representation and Reality in the Artistry of Early Medieval Literature: Observations on early medieval weather in general, bloody rain in particular, Paul Edward Dutton-- The King says No: on the logic of type-scenes in late antique and early medieval narrative, Joachin Martinez Pizarro-- Of arms and the (Ger)man: literary and material culture in the Waltharius, Jan M. Ziolkowski-- Representations and reality in early medieval literature, Danuta Shanzer-- Part 4-- Practices of Power in an Early Medieval Empire: Charlemagne and empire, Janet L. Nelson-- A pattern for power: Charlemagne's delegation of judicial responsibilities, Jennifer R. Davies-- Practices of property in the Carolingian empire, Matthew J. Innes-- The cunning of institutions, Stuart Airlie-- Part 5-- The Intellectuality of Early Medieval Art: Charlemagne's balcony: the Solarium in 9th-century narratives, Mayke de Jong-- Image and object: Christ's dual nature and the crisis of early medieval art, Herbert L. Kessler-- Matter and meaning in the Carolingian world, Thomas F.X. Noble-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780754662549 20160528
Recent advances in research show that the distinctive features of high medieval civilization began developing centuries earlier than previously thought. The era once dismissed as a "Dark Age" now turns out to have been the long morning of the medieval millennium: the centuries from AD 500 to 1000 witnessed the dawn of developments that were to shape Europe for centuries to come. In 2004, historians, art historians, archaeologists, and literary specialists from Europe and North America convened at Harvard University for an interdisciplinary conference exploring new directions in the study of that long morning of medieval Europe, the early Middle Ages.Invited to think about what seemed to each the most exciting new ways of investigating the early development of western European civilization, this impressive group of international scholars produced a wide-ranging discussion of innovative types of research that define tomorrow's field today. The contributors, many of whom rarely publish in English, test approaches extending from using ancient DNA to deducing cultural patterns signified by thousands of medieval manuscripts of saints' lives. They examine the archaeology of slave labor, economic systems, disease history, transformations of piety, the experience of power and property, exquisite literary sophistication, and the construction of the meaning of palace spaces or images of the divinity. The book illustrates in an approachable style the vitality of research into the early Middle Ages, and the signal contributions of that era to the future development of western civilization.The chapters cluster around new approaches to five key themes: the early medieval economy; early medieval holiness; representation and reality in early medieval literary art; practices of power in an early medieval empire; and the intellectuality of early medieval art and architecture. Michael McCormick's brief introductions open each part of the volume; synthetic essays by accomplished specialists conclude them. The editors summarize the whole in a synoptic introduction. All Latin terms and citations and other foreign-language quotations are translated, making this work accessible even to undergraduates. "The Long Morning of Medieval Europe: New Directions in Early Medieval Studies" presents innovative research across the wide spectrum of study of the early Middle Ages. It exemplifies the promising questions and methodologies at play in the field today, and the directions that beckon tomorrow.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780754662549 20160528
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-209C/409-01
Book
143 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 21 cm.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-209C/409-01
Book
222 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 27 cm.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-209C/409-01
Book
1 v. (various pagings) : ill. ; 25 cm.
  • Sacred image, sacred power-- Icons and icon piety in early Byzantium-- Ruminations on edible icons - originals and copies in the art of Byzantium-- Graceland as locus sanctus-- Byzantine pilgrim's art-- Early Byzantine pilgrimage devotionalia as evidence for the appearance of pilgrimage shrines-- Pilgrims in magi's clothing - the impact of mimesis on early Byzantine pilgrimage art-- "Guided by land and sea" - pilgrim art and pilgrim travel in early Byzantium-- Art, medicine and magic in early Byzantium-- Art and marriage in early Byzantium-- Two Byzantine amuletic armbands and the group to which they belong-- Two unpublished pilgrim tokens in the Benaki Museum and the group to which they belong-- Early Christian and Byzantine rings - the Zucker family collection-- The Trier ivory, adventus ceremonial and the relics of St Stephen-- Meaning in Coptic funerary sculpture.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780860789345 20160527
In these studies Gary Vikan has opened new perspectives on the daily life and material culture of Late Antiquity - more specifically, on icons and relics and on objects revealing of the world of pilgrimage, the early cult of saints and marriage. He contextualizes these familiar categories of object in the patterns of belief and ritual extracted from contemporary texts and the objects themselves, in order to understand their meaning within the everyday lives of those by whom and for whom they were made. The studies give a nuanced delineation of the inherently ambiguous boundary between conventional religion and magic, noting repeatedly those instances wherein the two are invoked in the same breath (and by way of the same art object), toward the same end. From this historically constructed matrix of art, belief and ritual, the author derives an anthropologically defined paradigm of charisma and pilgrimage (applied in one essay, as an intriguing parallel, to deconstructing the world of a contemporary secular "saint", Elvis Presley).
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780860789345 20160527
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-209C/409-01
Book
163 p. ; 19 cm.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-209C/409-01
Book
207 p. : ill. ; 27 cm.
  • Introduction 7 1. Matter and Memory 13 2. Icon and Idol 39 3. Truth and Economy 61 4. Figure and Sign 83 5. Form and Likeness 107 6. Word and Image 125 Conclusion 138 Abbreviations 140 Notes 141 Bibliography 175 Acknowledgments 201 Index 203 Photography Credits 207.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691091778 20160528
"Figure and Likeness" presents a thought-provoking new account of Byzantine iconoclasm - the fundamental crisis in Christian visual representation during the eighth and ninth centuries that defined the terms of Christianity's relationship to the painted image. Charles Barber rejects the conventional means of analyzing this crisis, which seeks its origin in political and other social factors. Instead, he argues, iconoclasm is primarily a matter of theology and aesthetic theory. Working between the theological texts and the visual materials, Barber demonstrates that in challenging the validity of iconic representation, iconoclasts were asking: how can an image depict an incomprehensible God? In response, iconophile theologians gradually developed a notion of representation that distinguished the work of art from the subject it depicted. As such, Barber concludes, they were forced to move the language describing the icon beyond that of theology. This pivotal step allowed these theologians, of whom Patriarch Nikephoros and Theodore of Stoudios were the most important, to define and defend a specifically Christian art. In highlighting this outcome and also in offering a full and clearly rendered account of iconoclastic notions of Christian representation, Barber reveals that the notion of art was indeed central to the unfolding of iconoclasm. The implications of this study reach well beyond the dispute it considers. Barber fundamentally revises not only our understanding of Byzantine art in the years succeeding the iconoclastic dispute, but also of Christian painting in the centuries to come.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691091778 20160528
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-209C/409-01
Book
216 p., [74] p. of plates : ill. (some col.), facsims., plan ; 29 cm.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-209C/409-01
Book
xiii, 338 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
  • List of illustrations-- Preface-- List of abbreviations-- 1. Introduction-- 2. The passion and Christological inquiry at the court of Charlemagne-- 3. The crucified God in the Gellone Sacramentary and Hrabanus Maurus' In honorem sanctae crucis-- 4. The crucified Christ in later Carolingian literature-- 5. For whom did Christ die?: the controversy over divine predestination-- 6. One-time sacrifice, daily food and drink: the controversy over the eucharist-- 7. Three later Carolingian crucifixion images-- 8. Conclusion-- Select bibliography-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521801034 20160528
The Carolingian 'Renaissance' of the late eighth and ninth centuries, in what is now France, western Germany and northern Italy, transformed medieval European culture. At the same time it engendered a need to ensure that clergy, monks and laity embraced orthodox Christian doctrine. This book offers a fresh perspective on the period by examining transformations in a major current of thought as revealed through literature and artistic imagery: the doctrine of the Passion and the crucified Christ. The evidence of a range of literary sources is surveyed - liturgical texts, poetry, hagiography, letters, homilies, exegetical and moral tractates - but special attention is given to writings from the discussions and debates concerning artistic images, Adoptionism, predestination and the Eucharist.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521801034 20160528
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-209C/409-01
Book
xx, 330 p., [68] p. of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 25 cm.
Provides a detailed study of the Great Mosque, using textual, visual and archaeological evidence. The work explores the function of religious architecture within an official visual discourse intended to project a distinctive Muslim identity determined by Umayyad political aspirations.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789004116382 20160528
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-209C/409-01

16. On the holy icons [2001]

Book
115 p. ; 19 cm.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-209C/409-01
Book
xiv, 221 p. : ill., maps ; 22 cm.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-209C/409-01
Book
xxiii, 489 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
  • List of illustrations-- Preface-- Acknowledgements-- Abbreviations-- Introduction-- 1. Sitting the miniatures: imagery in the ninth century-- 2. The miniatures: internal evidence-- 3. The biographical miniatures: toward image as exegesis-- 4. Basil I and visual panegyric-- 5. The patriarch Photios and visual exegesis-- 6. Mission, martyrdom and visual polemic-- 7. Perceptions of divinity-- 8. Iconography-- 9. Conclusions-- Appendices-- Bibliography-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521621533 20160528
The Byzantines used imagery to communicate a wide range of issues. In the context of Iconoclasm - the debate about the legitimacy of religious art conducted between c. AD 730 and 843 - Byzantine authors themselves claimed that visual images could express certain ideas better than words. Vision and Meaning in Ninth-Century Byzantium deals with how such visual communication worked and examines the types of messages that pictures could convey in the aftermath of Iconoclasm. Its focus is on a deluxe manuscript commissioned around 880, a copy of the fourth-century sermons of the Cappadocian church father Gregory of Nazianzus which presented to the Emperor Basil I, founder of the Macedonian dynasty, by one of the greatest scholars Byzantium ever produced, the patriarch Photios. The manuscript was lavishly decorated with gilded initials, elaborate headpieces and a full-page miniature before each of Gregory's sermons. Forty-six of these, including over 200 distinct scenes, survive. Fewer than half however were directly inspired by the homily that they accompany. Instead most function as commentaries on the ninth-century court and carefully deconstructed both provide us with information not available from preserved written sources and perhaps more important show us how visual images communicate differently from words.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521621533 20160528
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-209C/409-01
Book
xxii, 99 p. ; 24 cm.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-209C/409-01
Book
xiv, 232 p. : ill. (chiefly col.) ; 29 cm.
From the time of Herod through the Crusades, Jerusalem had officially changed its religion several times, with Jews, Christians, and Muslims inscribing the story of their faiths on the urban landscape. In this handsomely illustrated book, noted Islamist Oleg Grabar offers a rare account of the great role played by early Islam in defining the 'look' of Jerusalem that remained largely intact until the twentieth century. From about 640 to 1100, Muslims transformed Christian Jerusalem, mainly the area now known as the Haram al-Sharif, both physically and ideologically to embody their new faith. Grabar examines this process, showing how it led to great architectural achievements, including The Dome of the Rock, still perhaps the most vivid image to impress any visitor to Jerusalem. Offering a major photographic record of The Dome's mosaics in color together with its interiors, this book shows in rich detail how Islam articulated itself architecturally, touching on historical and legendary memories and on themes of both religious harmony and Islamic triumph. Dominating Jerusalem's landscape today, The Dome of the Rock was commissioned by Abd Al-Malik in 691, and still houses the Rock from which the Prophet Mohammed is believed to have ascended into heaven. Grabar argues that its construction altered the visual equilibrium of Jerusalem by equating its eastern hill, Mt. Moriah, a key landmark in Islam, with its western ones, Golgotha and Mt. Zion, highlighted by Christian monuments. A close look at The Dome's construction and decoration leads to a new explanation of the building as a Late Antique monument of art that could be adapted to several different and at times simultaneous interpretations. Grabar also offers a unique portrait of Jerusalem in the eleventh century under the Fatimid dynasty in Cairo, when the city was at its peak as a peaceful, cosmopolitan center. Through an innovative computer modeling program, Grabar presents fascinating reconstructions of the Haram al-Sharif, taking us down streets and past buildings, of which only remnants exist today.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691036533 20160528
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-105B/305B-01, ARTHIST-209C/409-01