Book
165 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 30 cm
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-193-01
Book
xi, 236 p., [8] p. of plates : ill. (some col) ; 23 cm.
What impact do sexual politics and queer identities have on the understanding of blackness as a set of visual, cultural and intellectual concerns? In Queering Post-Black Art, Derek Conrad Murray argues that the rise of female, gay and lesbian artists as legitimate African-American creative voices is essential to the development of black art. He considers iconic works by artists including Glenn Ligon, Kehinde Wiley, Mickalene Thomas and Kalup Linzy, which question whether it is possible for blackness to evade its ideologically over-determined cultural legibility. In their own unique, often satirical way, a new generation of contemporary African American artists represent the ever-evolving sexual and gender politics that have come to define the highly controversial notion of post-black art. First coined in 2001, the term post-black resonated because it articulated the frustrations of young African-American artists around notions of identity and belonging that they perceived to be stifling, reductive and exclusionary. Since then, these artists have begun to conceive an idea of blackness that is beyond marginalization and sexual discrimination.".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781784532864 20160619
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-193-01
Book
191 pages : ill. (chiefly color) ; 32 cm
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-193-01
Book
xi, 171 pages : illustrations (chiefly color), maps, portraits ; 28 cm
Featuring more than 140 colour illustrations, the catalogue Archibald Motley: Jazz Age Modernist accompanies the first full-scale survey of the work of Archibald Motley, on view at the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University from January 30, 2014, through May 11, 2014. Archibald John Motley, Jr., was an American painter, master colourist, and radical interpreter of urban culture. Among twentieth-century American artists, Motley is surely one of the most important and, paradoxically, also one of the most enigmatic. Born in New Orleans in 1891, Motley spent the first half of the twentieth century living and working in a predominately white neighbourhood on Chicago's South Side, just blocks away from the city's burgeoning black community. During his formative years, Chicago's African American population increased dramatically, and he was both a witness to and a visual chronicler of that expansion. In 1929 he won a Guggenheim Fellowship, which funded a critical year of study in France, where he painted Blues and other memorable pictures of Paris. In the 1950s, Motley made several lengthy visits to Mexico, where his nephew, the well-known novelist Willard F. Motley, lived. While there, Motley created vivid depictions of Mexican life and landscapes. He died in Chicago in 1981.Motley's brilliant yet idiosyncratic paintings - simultaneously expressionist and social realist - have captured worldwide attention with their rainbow-hued, syncopated compositions. The exhibition includes the artist's depictions of African American life in early-twentieth-century Chicago, as well as his portraits and archetypes, portrayals of African American life in Jazz Age Paris, and renderings of 1950s Mexico. The catalogue includes an essay by Richard J. Powell, organizer and curator of Archibald Motley: Jazz Age Modernist, as well as contributions from other scholars examining the life, work, and legacy of one of twentieth-century America's most significant artists. After debuting at the Nasher Museum of Art, the exhibition will travel to other museums across the country: the Amon Carter Museum of American Art, in Fort Worth, Texas; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Chicago Cultural Centre; and the Newark Museum. Contributors. Elizabeth Alexander, Davarian L. Baldwin, David C. Driskell, Oliver Meslay, Amy M. Mooney, Richard J. Powell Publication of the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780938989370 20160613
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-193-01
Book
155 pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 27 x 32 cm
In 1938 Hale Woodruff (1900-1980) accepted a commission to paint a series of murals for Talladega College, one of the nation's first colleges established for blacks after the Civil War. Installed in the institution's newly constructed library, the six murals portray noteworthy events in the rise of blacks in America from slavery to freedom. Today they stand out as provocative and relevant symbols of the centuries-long struggle for civil and human rights. Essays consider the development of the murals, their presence and significance at Talladega College, and Woodruff's impact on American mural painting in the years surrounding the Talladega project. An illustrated essay details all phases of the murals' conservation. Illustrated works span Woodruff's career and include oil studies; support materials such as prints, drawings, and photographs; and mural cycles he made in Mexico while studying with Diego Rivera. Stephanie Mayer Heydt is the Margaret and Terry Stent Curator of American Art at the High Museum of Art, Atlanta. Other contributors include Renee Ater, David C. Driskell, Larry Shutts, and Juliette Smith.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781932543469 20160609
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-193-01
Book
118 p. : ill. (chiefly col.) ; 26 cm.
An essential figure in modern American art, William H. Johnson (1901-1970) was a virtuoso skilled in various media and techniques, who produced thousands of works over a career that spanned decades, continents, and genres. This volume considers paintings from the collection of Morgan State University in Baltimore, Maryland, that show the pivotal stages in Johnson's career as a modernist painter of post-impressionist and expressionist works reminiscent of Cezanne, Van Gogh, and Soutine, and the vernacular paintings in which he articulates his specific, unforgettable voice as an artist. In this lavishly illustrated book, some of the world's premier scholars of William H. Johnson and African American art history examine the artist and his artistic genius in fresh new ways, including his relationship with one of his earliest patrons, the Harmon Foundation; the critical role played by scholars at the nation's historically black colleges and universities; the context of Johnson's experiences living in Harlem and his deep southern roots; and Johnson as a trailblazer in the genres of still life and landscape painting. Richard J. Powell is the John Spencer Bassett Professor of Art and Art History at Duke University. Other contributors are Aaron Bryant, David C. Driskell, Leslie King-Hammond, and Lowery Stokes Sims.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780295991481 20160606
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-193-01
Book
xv, 207 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 26 cm.
In 1955, shortly after Emmett Till was murdered by white supremacists in Mississippi, his grieving mother distributed to the press a gruesome photograph of his mutilated corpse. Asked why she would do this, she explained that by witnessing with their own eyes the brutality of segregation and racism, Americans would be more likely to support the cause of racial justice. 'Let the world see what I've seen', was her reply. The publication of the photograph inspired a generation of activists to join the civil rights movement. Despite this extraordinary episode, the story of visual culture's role in the modern civil rights movement is rarely included in its history. This is the first comprehensive examination of the ways images mattered in the struggle, and it investigates a broad range of media including photography, television, film, magazines, newspapers, and advertising. These images were ever present and diverse: the startling footage of Southern white aggression and black suffering that appeared night after night on television news programmes; the photographs of black achievers and martyrs in Negro periodicals; the humble snapshot, no less powerful in its ability to edify and motivate. In each case, the war against racism was waged through pictures - millions of points of light, millions of potent weapons that forever changed a nation. Through vivid storytelling and incisive analysis, this powerful book allows us to see and understand the crucial role that visual culture played in forever changing a nation.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780300121315 20160604
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-193-01
Book
x, 354 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 27 cm.
  • Harlem's artistic community in the 1930s
  • Patrons and the making of a professional artist
  • African American storytelling : Toussaint l'Ouverture and Harriet Tubman
  • The great migration in memory, pictures, and text
  • Confrontations with the Jim Crow South in the 1940s
  • Home in Harlem : tenements and streets
  • The double consciousness of masks and masking
  • The paintings of the protest years, 1955-70.
Jacob Lawrence was one of the best-known African American artists of the twentieth century. In "Painting Harlem Modern", Patricia Hills renders a vivid assessment of Lawrence's long and productive career. She argues that his complex, cubist-based paintings developed out of a vital connection with a modern Harlem that was filled with artists, writers, musicians, and social activists. She also uniquely positions Lawrence alongside such important African American writers as Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, and Ralph Ellison. Drawing from a wide range of archival materials and interviews with artists, Hills interprets Lawrence's art as distilled from a life of struggle and perseverance. She brings insightful analysis to his work, beginning with the 1930s street scenes that provided Harlem with its pictorial image, and follows each decade of Lawrence's work, with accounts that include his impressions of Southern Jim Crow segregation and a groundbreaking discussion of Lawrence's symbolic use of masks and masking during the 1950s Cold War era. "Painting Harlem Modern" is an absorbing book that highlights Lawrence's heroic efforts to meet his many challenges while remaining true to his humanist values and artistic vision.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520252417 20160528
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-193-01
Book
xvii, 253 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 28 cm.
  • Foreword / Robert E. Hemenway
  • Directors' Foreword / Saralyn Reece Hardy and Victor D. Simmons
  • Introduction / Kinshasha Holman Conwill
  • Harlem, modernism, and beyond : Aaron Douglas and his role in art/history / Susan Earle
  • The Aaron Douglas effect / Richard J. Powell
  • Aaron Douglas: influences and impacts of the early years / Cheryl R. Ragar
  • Some observations on Aaron Douglas as tastemaker in the renaissance movement / David C. Driskell
  • Creating a "usable past" and a "future perfect society" : Aaron Douglas's murals for the 1936 Texas Centennial Exposition / Renée Ater
  • The fisk murals revealed: memories of Africa, hope for the future / Amy Helene Kirschke
  • Plates
  • Chronology / Stephanie Fox Knappe.
In paintings, murals, and book illustrations, Aaron Douglas (1899-1979) produced the most powerful visual legacy of the Harlem Renaissance, prompting the philosopher and writer Alain Locke to dub him the 'father of Black American art'. Working from a politicized concept of personal identity and a Utopian vision of the future, the artist made a lasting impact on American art history and on the nation's cultural heritage. Douglas' role, as well as that of the Harlem Renaissance in general, in the evolution of American modernism deserves close scholarly attention, which it finally receives in this beautifully illustrated book. Douglas combined angular Cubist rhythms and seductive Art Deco dynamism with traditional African and African American imagery. The result was a radically new Utopian visual vocabulary that evoked both current realities and hopes for a better future. Presenting more than ninety illustrations of Douglas' works and the commentary of leading critics and historians, this book focuses on the artist's career from the 1920s through the 1940s in relation to American modernism. Its authors argue that Douglas' bold work opened doors for African American artists in Harlem and beyond, and that it invited a dialogue with modernism that put African American life, labour, and freedom, along with African traditions and motifs, at its centre. New information emerges from these pages, reflecting the rich interchange between the visual arts, music, dance, literature, and politics that shaped Douglas' work and also defined the Harlem Renaissance.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780300121803 20160528
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-193-01

10. Charles Alston [2007]

Book
x, 118 p. : ill. (chiefly col.) ; 29 cm.
  • Introduction
  • Enduring roots
  • Living the Renaissance
  • Modern life and modern art
  • A man for all seasons
  • An enduring narrative
  • Charles Alston chronology.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-193-01
Book
216 p. : ill. (chiefly col.) ; 30 cm.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-193-01
Book
117 p. : col. ill., ports. ; 28 cm.
An object maker, musician, poet, and performer, Willie Cole is an artist with remarkably diverse art-making skills and a formidable imagination. Best known for his assemblage, mixed media sculptural works, and prints, Cole liberates and aggrandizes everyday artifacts, including irons, ironing boards, hairdryers, high-heeled shoes, lawn jockeys, bicycle parts, and other discarded domestic appliances and hardware and transforms them into powerful and iconic art works. The time-textured objects that he works with are seen by most as banal and expendable, but in Cole's hands they are given new vitality and metaphorical meaning. Frequently, he takes his found American consumer objects and Africanizes or ritualizes them, creating potent global artistic hybrids. His works also track his distinctive, Newark, New Jersey-based heritage, movingly melding the social, political, and cultural perspectives of urban African American experience. Although wit and humor are often evident in his methods, Cole's readaptions of African tribal art motifs and forms are based more in respectful appreciation than appropriation and careful study rather than simple imitation. His works address a range of serious topics including race relations, capitalist materialism, religious belief systems, and human pathos. Surveying the wide range of Cole's methods, media, and themes from the late 1980s to the present, this catalog includes thirty stunning color illustrations of his most significant sculptures, paintings, works on paper, and prints. An extensive interview with Cole by Dr. Leslie King-Hammond, dean of the Maryland Institute of Art, as well as a commentary by Dr. Lowery Stokes Sims, president of the Studio Museum in Harlem, about Cole's pivotal residency there place this unique artist's work in the context of African American and contemporary art. The catalog also includes biographical information in the form of two chronologies, one of which is a personal resume by the artist, as well as exhibition histories, bibliographies, and a listing of public collections of his work.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813538631 20160528
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-193-01
Book
xviii, 225 p., [24] p. of plates : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Photography on the color line-- Envisioning race-- The art of scientific propaganda-- "Families of undoubted respectability"-- Spectacles of whiteness: The photography of lynching-- The archivist in the archive.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780822333319 20160528
Through a rich interpretation of the remarkable photographs, W. E. B. Du Bois compiled for the American Negro Exhibit at the 1900 Paris Exposition, Shawn Michelle Smith reveals the visual dimension of the color line that Du Bois famously called 'the problem of the twentieth century'. Du Bois' prize-winning exhibit consisted of three albums containing 363 black-and-white photographs, mostly of middle-class African Americans from Atlanta and other parts of Georgia. Smith provides an extensive analysis of the images, the antiracist message Du Bois conveyed by collecting and displaying them, and their connection to his critical thought.She contends that Du Bois was an early visual theorist of race and racism, and she demonstrates how such an understanding makes important concepts he developed - including double consciousness, the color line, the veil, and second-sight - available to visual culture and African American studies scholars in powerful new ways. Smith reads Du Bois' photographs in relation to other turn-of-the-century images such as scientific typologies, criminal mugshots, racist caricatures, and lynching photographs. By juxtaposing these images with reproductions from Du Bois' exhibition archive, Smith shows how Du Bois deliberately challenged racist representations of African Americans. Emphasizing the importance of comparing multiple visual archives. "Photography on the Color Line" reinvigorates understandings of the stakes of representation and the fundamental connections between race and visual culture in the United States.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780822333319 20160528
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-193-01
Book
202 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
  • Contents-- List of Illustrations-- Introduction - Ethiopia Awakening-- What a Carving Re-members-- Harlem Nostalgia-- The Double-Headed Axe-- (Re) visioning Africa-- When Memory Fails-- Crossroads to Amnesia-- Conclusion - Spring and Renewal-- Notes-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780295981505 20160528
"The Shattered Gourd" uses the lens of visual art to examine connections between the United States and the Yoruba region of western Nigeria. In Yoruba legend, the sacred Calabash of Being contained the Water of Life; when the gourd was shattered, its fragments were scattered over the ground, death invaded the world, and imperfection crept into human affairs. In more modern times, the shattered gourd has symbolized the warfare and enslavement that culminated in the black diasporas. The 're-membering' of the gourd is represented by the survival of people of African origin all over the Americas, and, in this volume, by their rediscovery of African art forms on the diaspora soil of the United States.Twentieth-century African American artists employing Yoruba images in their work have gone from protest art to the exploration and celebration of the self and the community. But because the social, economic, and political context of African art forms differs markedly from that of American culture, critical contradictions between form and meaning often appear in African American works that use African forms.In this book - the first to treat Yoruba forms while transcending the conventional emphasis on them as folk art, focusing instead on the high art tradition - Moyo Okediji uses nearly four dozen works to illustrate a broad thematic treatment combined with a detailed approach to individual African and African American artists. Incorporating works by such artists as Meta Warrick Fuller, Hale Woodruff, Aaron Douglas, Elizabeth Catlett, Ademola Olugebefola, Paul Keene, Jeff Donaldson, Howardena Pindell, Muneer Bahauddeen, Michelle Turner, Michael Harris, Winnie Owens-Hart, and John Biggers, the author invites the reader to envision what he describes as 'the immense possibilities of the future, as the twenty-first century embraces the twentieth in a primal dance of the diasporas', a future that heralds the advent of the global as a distinct movement in art, beyond postmodernism.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780295981505 20160528
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-193-01
Book
232 p. : ill. (chiefly col.) ; 27 cm.
Tempera was a primary medium for artistic expression in Europe in the 14th and 15th centuries. Milk and Eggs examines the American re-emergence of tempera painting in the mid-20th century. It experienced a renaissance in the work of a large number of mostly unconnected American artists, including Thomas Hart Benton, Paul Cadmus, Jacob Lawrence, and Andrew Wyeth among others. Milk and Eggs focuses on four centers where tempera painting was revived - Yale University School of Art, the Art Students League of New York, the studio of N. C. Wyeth in Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania, and the Kansas City Art Institute - and the historical, cultural, and philosophical factors that drove the revival, including the Great Depression and the Works Progress Administration. It also examines the medium in great detail, its materials and preparation, and arrives at a definition of tempera. Moreover, the results of extensive analysis of certain works of art is included.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780295981901 20160528
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-193-01
Book
285 p. : ill. (chiefly col.) ; 31 cm.
"Over the Line: The Art and Life of Jacob Lawrence" includes essays by eight distinguished art historians examining the ways in which Jacob Lawrence's art speaks so powerfully to different audiences. It is the first multi-author, in-depth probe of the artist's entire career: the nature of his work, his education, the critical climate in which he worked, and his use of materials and techniques. It reproduces, in full colour, more than 200 works, most of which have not been published in colour, or at all, in other books on the artist. An extensive chronology, collating events in his life with his public reception - including selected exhibitions, publications, honours, and awards - is illustrated with family photographs. Jacob Lawrence (1917-2000) spent his childhood in New York City, attending classes at the Harlem Community Art Center and the American Artists School, and later working for the Federal Art Project. While still in his twenties Lawrence exhibited his paintings at major museums across the country, including the Phillips Collection, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Museum of Modern Art in New York, where he became the first African American artist represented in the permanent collection. He lived, painted, and taught in New York City until 1971, when he moved to Seattle to join the faculty of the University of Washington. He was the recipient of numerous awards including the National Medal of Arts. The paperback edition of "Over the Line" is published in conjunction with a major exhibition opening at the Phillips Collection, Washington, DC, and travelling to the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Detroit Institute of Arts, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. Peter T. Nesbett was the director and Michelle DuBois the associate director of the Jacob Lawrence Catalogue Raisonne Project. The contributors to "Over the Line" include Patricia Hills, Paul J. Karlstrom, Leslie King-Hammond, Lizzetta LaFalle-Collins, Richard J. Powell, Lowery Stokes Sims, Elizabeth Steele, and Elizabeth Hutton Turner.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780295979656 20160528
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-193-01
Book
xviii, 348 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 32 cm.
The first comprehensive history of black American photographers. 600 images that give glimpses of black life from slavery to the great migrations are included. The book is a refutation of the caricature of mainstream photographers who have emphasised despair over hope. Featuring the work of James Presley Ball, C.M. Battey, James VanDerZee, Morgan and Marvin Smith, Gordon Parks, Moneta Sleet, Jr, and Carrie Mae Weems, among hundreds of others.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780393048803 20160528
Green Library, Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-193-01
Book
240 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-193-01
Book
ix, 167 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 28 cm.
'My process is designed to give us 'colored folk' and women a taste of the American dream straight up. Since the facts don't do that too often, I decided to make it up...That is the real power and joy of being an artist. We can make it come true. Or look true' - Faith Ringgold, in a 1992 interview. This catalog is the first book-length publication devoted to the exquisite story quilts of contemporary artist Faith Ringgold. Combining painted images, handwritten texts, and quilting techniques, Ringgold weaves together modernist painting; feminist critique; postmodernist strategies of appropriation, parody, and montage; and, personal memoir in a remarkable synthesis that takes on European modernism, African American folk art, and the 'black aesthetic' of the 1960's and 1970's. The catalog accompanies an exhibition of "The French Collection" and "The American Collection", a series of story quilts Ringgold has produced since 1990.Catalog essays include an examination of Ringgold's stylistic development through the 1960's and 1970's, an exploration of the social and political aspects of the story quilts, and a recollection by the artist's daughter, writer Michele Wallace. Ringgold has adapted the tradition of the American slave quilt to create a world in which African Americans and women dominate, where history is not only questioned but also reinvented. The titles of the quilts in Ringgold's "French Collection" and "American Collection" suggest her subject range and daring: "Jo Baker's Birthday Party"; "Dinner at Gertrude Stein's"; "A Portrait of Aunt Jemima"; and, "Tubman, Douglass, and Truth: Wanted Dead or Alive" are examples.Faith Ringgold's broad audience of admirers (her books for children have won Caldecott and "New York Times" book illustration honors) will welcome "Dancing at the Louvre". Finally there is a book that displays her artistic achievements and provides a full discussion of her importance within contemporary art.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520214293 20160528
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-193-01
Book
95 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 27 cm.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-193-01