Book
285 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 24 cm
Art historian Darby English is celebrated for working against the grain and plumbing gaps in historical narratives. In this book, he explores the year 1971, when two exhibitions opened that brought modernist painting and sculpture into the burning heart of black cultural politics: Contemporary Black Artists in America, shown at the Whitney Museum of American Art, and The DeLuxe Show, an integrated abstract art exhibition presented in a renovated movie theater in a Houston ghetto.1971 takes an insightful look at many black artists' desire to gain freedom from overt racial representation, as well as their and their advocates' efforts to further that aim through public exhibitions. Amid calls to define a "black aesthetic" or otherwise settle the race question, these experiments with modernist art favored cultural interaction and instability. Contemporary Black Artists in America highlighted abstraction as a stance against normative approaches, while The DeLuxe Show positioned abstraction in a center of urban blight. The power and social importance of these experiments, English argues, came partly from color's special status as a racial metaphor and partly from investigations of color that were underway in formalist American art and criticism. From Frank Bowling to Virginia Jaramillo, Sam Gilliam to Peter Bradley, black modernists and their supporters rose above the demand to represent or be represented, compromising nothing in their appeals for racial reconciliation. At a time when many debates about identity sought closure, these exhibitions offered openings; when icons and slogans touted simple solutions, they chose difficulty. But above all, as English demonstrates in this provocative book, these exhibitions and artists responded with optimism rather than cynicism to the surrounding culture's preoccupation with color.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226131054 20170220
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-193-01
Book
165 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 30 cm
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-193-01
Book
xi, 236 p., [8] p. of plates : ill. (some col) ; 23 cm.
What impact do sexual politics and queer identities have on the understanding of blackness as a set of visual, cultural and intellectual concerns? In Queering Post-Black Art, Derek Conrad Murray argues that the rise of female, gay and lesbian artists as legitimate African-American creative voices is essential to the development of black art. He considers iconic works by artists including Glenn Ligon, Kehinde Wiley, Mickalene Thomas and Kalup Linzy, which question whether it is possible for blackness to evade its ideologically over-determined cultural legibility. In their own unique, often satirical way, a new generation of contemporary African American artists represent the ever-evolving sexual and gender politics that have come to define the highly controversial notion of post-black art. First coined in 2001, the term post-black resonated because it articulated the frustrations of young African-American artists around notions of identity and belonging that they perceived to be stifling, reductive and exclusionary. Since then, these artists have begun to conceive an idea of blackness that is beyond marginalization and sexual discrimination.".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781784532864 20160619
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
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Book
294 pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 33 cm
The first publication of the Barnes Foundation's important and extensive African art collection. The Barnes Foundation is renowned for its astonishing collection of Postimpressionist and early Modern art assembled by Albert C. Barnes, a Philadelphia pharmaceutical entrepreneur. Less known is the pioneering collection of African sculpture that Barnes acquired between 1922 and 1924, mainly from Paul Guillaume, the Paris-based dealer. The Barnes Foundation was one of the first permanent installations in the United States to present objects from Africa as fine art. Indeed, the African collection is central to understanding Barnes's socially progressive vision for his foundation. This comprehensive volume showcases all 123 objects, including reliquary figures, masks, and utensils, most of which originated in France's African colonies-Mali, Cote d'Ivoire, Gabon, and the Congo-as well as in Sierra Leone, Republic of Benin, and Nigeria. Christa Clarke considers the significance of the collection and Barnes's role in the Harlem Renaissance and in fostering broader appreciation of African art in the twentieth century. In-depth catalogue entries by noted scholars in the field complete the volume.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780847845217 20160618
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
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Book
xiii, 182 pages : chiefly illustrations (chiefly color) ; 29 cm
  • Horace Pippin : the way I see him / Kerry James Marshall
  • All the details I need : Horace Pippin's sources / Jacqueline Francis
  • "Distinctly American" : Albert C. Barnes and hOrace Pippin / Judith F. Dolkart
  • Witness : history, memory, and authenticity in the art of Horace Pippin / Anne Monahan
  • Winning the peace over Mr. Prejudice : Horace Pippin, the social gospel, and the Double V / Edward Puchner
  • The man on the bench : meditating on Horace Pippin's late work / Audrey Lewis.
Horace Pippin's response to the question of what made him a great painter: "I paint it the way I see it." This exciting new publication will look closely at Pippin (1888-1946) as an artist who was embraced by the art world, yet remained independent, creating and upholding a unique aesthetic sensibility while also candidly, if subtly, expressing his opinions on a wide range of social issues. A self-taught master of form, colour and composition, Pippin vividly depicted a range of subject matter, from scenes of war, history and religion, to sporting scenes, floral still lifes and intimate family moments. Accompanying a major exhibition at the Brandywine River Museum of Art, the book will be the first examination of the artist's work in twenty years and is an opportunity to re-examine Pippin with fresh eyes. His development as a self-aware, self-taught artist will be explored in-depth, looking at the rich pictorial language and multi-layered narratives of his paintings. Fully illustrated with over 60 works from around the United States, the book will introduce a new generation of scholarly voices, speaking to such issues as influence, racial and religious politics, and narrative truths in history.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781857599411 20160618
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
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Book
191 pages : ill. (chiefly color) ; 32 cm
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
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Book
286 pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 29 cm
This beautifully illustrated catalogue accompanies the first major museum retrospective of the painter Norman Lewis (1909-1979). Lewis was the sole African American artist of his generation who became committed to issues of abstraction at the start of his career and continued to explore them over its entire trajectory. His art derived inspiration from music (jazz and classical) and nature (seasonal change, plant forms, the sea). Also central to his work were the dramatic confrontations of the civil rights movement, in which he was an active participant among the New York art scene. Bridging the Harlem Renaissance, Abstract Expressionism, and beyond, Lewis is a crucial figure in American abstraction whose reinsertion into the discourse further opens the field for recognition of the contributions of artists of color. Bringing much-needed attention to Lewis' output and significance in the history of American art, Procession is a milestone in Lewis scholarship and a vital resource for future study of the artist and abstraction in his period. Published in association with Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520288003 20160619
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-193-01
Book
xi, 171 pages : illustrations (chiefly color), maps, portraits ; 28 cm
Featuring more than 140 colour illustrations, the catalogue Archibald Motley: Jazz Age Modernist accompanies the first full-scale survey of the work of Archibald Motley, on view at the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University from January 30, 2014, through May 11, 2014. Archibald John Motley, Jr., was an American painter, master colourist, and radical interpreter of urban culture. Among twentieth-century American artists, Motley is surely one of the most important and, paradoxically, also one of the most enigmatic. Born in New Orleans in 1891, Motley spent the first half of the twentieth century living and working in a predominately white neighbourhood on Chicago's South Side, just blocks away from the city's burgeoning black community. During his formative years, Chicago's African American population increased dramatically, and he was both a witness to and a visual chronicler of that expansion. In 1929 he won a Guggenheim Fellowship, which funded a critical year of study in France, where he painted Blues and other memorable pictures of Paris. In the 1950s, Motley made several lengthy visits to Mexico, where his nephew, the well-known novelist Willard F. Motley, lived. While there, Motley created vivid depictions of Mexican life and landscapes. He died in Chicago in 1981.Motley's brilliant yet idiosyncratic paintings - simultaneously expressionist and social realist - have captured worldwide attention with their rainbow-hued, syncopated compositions. The exhibition includes the artist's depictions of African American life in early-twentieth-century Chicago, as well as his portraits and archetypes, portrayals of African American life in Jazz Age Paris, and renderings of 1950s Mexico. The catalogue includes an essay by Richard J. Powell, organizer and curator of Archibald Motley: Jazz Age Modernist, as well as contributions from other scholars examining the life, work, and legacy of one of twentieth-century America's most significant artists. After debuting at the Nasher Museum of Art, the exhibition will travel to other museums across the country: the Amon Carter Museum of American Art, in Fort Worth, Texas; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Chicago Cultural Centre; and the Newark Museum. Contributors. Elizabeth Alexander, Davarian L. Baldwin, David C. Driskell, Oliver Meslay, Amy M. Mooney, Richard J. Powell Publication of the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780938989370 20160613
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xx, 666 pages ; 27 cm
  • Section I: Theory/Criticism
  • Politics and Culture
  • Gender
  • Aesthetics/Poetics
  • Section II: Statements of Purpose: Groups and Journals
  • Section III: Poetry
  • Consciousness
  • Malcolm
  • Coltrane and Jazz
  • Africa
  • Women
  • Heritage
  • Songs
  • Section IV: Drama
  • Section V: Fiction/Narrative
  • Afterwords.
This volume brings together a broad range of key writings from the Black Arts Movement of the 1960s and 1970s, among the most significant cultural movements in American history. The aesthetic counterpart of the Black Power movement, it burst onto the scene in the form of artists' circles, writers' workshops, drama groups, dance troupes, new publishing ventures, bookstores, and cultural centres and had a presence in practically every community and college campus with an appreciable African American population. Black Arts activists extended its reach even further through magazines such as Ebony and Jet, on television shows such as Soul! and Like It Is, and on radio programmes. Many of the movement's leading artists, including Amiri Baraka, Ed Bullins, Nikki Giovanni, Woodie King, Haki Madhubuti, Sonia Sanchez, Askia Toure, and Val Gray Ward remain artistically productive today. Its influence can also be seen in the work of later artists, from the writers Toni Morrison, John Edgar Wideman, and August Wilson to actors Avery Brooks, Danny Glover, and Samuel L. Jackson, to hip hop artists Mos Def, Talib Kweli, and Chuck D. S.O.S --Calling All Black People includes works of fiction, poetry, and drama in addition to critical writings on issues of politics, aesthetics, and gender. It covers topics ranging from the legacy of Malcolm X and the impact of John Coltrane's jazz to the tenets of the Black Panther Party and the music of Motown. The editors have provided a substantial introduction outlining the nature, history, and legacy of the Black Arts Movement as well as the principles by which the anthology was assembled.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781625340306 20160619
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
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Book
xvi, 256 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 29 cm
  • Introduction. The blackness of things
  • Fred Wilson and the rhetoric of redress
  • Lorna Simpson's figurative transitions
  • Glenn Ligon and the matter of fugitivity
  • Renée Green's diasporic imagination
  • Epilogue. Alternate routes.
At the close of the twentieth century, black artists began to figure prominently in the mainstream American art world for the first time. Thanks to the social advances of the civil rights movement and the rise of multiculturalism, African American artists in the late 1980s and early '90s enjoyed unprecedented access to established institutions of publicity and display. Yet in this moment of ostensible freedom, black cultural practitioners found themselves turning to the history of slavery. "Bound to Appear" focuses on four of these artists - Renee Green, Glenn Ligon, Lorna Simpson, and Fred Wilson - who have dominated and shaped the field of American art over the past two decades through large-scale installations that radically departed from prior conventions for representing the enslaved. Huey Copeland shows that their projects draw on strategies associated with minimalism, conceptualism, and institutional critique to position the slave as a vexed figure - both subject and object, property and person. They also engage the visual logic of race in modernity and the challenges negotiated by black subjects in the present. As such, Copeland argues, their work reframes strategies of representation and rethinks how blackness might be imagined and felt long after the end of the "peculiar institution." The first book to examine in depth these artists' engagements with slavery, "Bound to Appear" will leave an indelible mark on modern and contemporary art.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226115702 20160612
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
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Book
xiv, 327 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Preface to the 20th-Anniversary Edition by Greil Marcus -- Introduction -- Part I -- 1. Blackface and Blackness: The Minstrel Show in American Culture -- 2. Love and Theft: "Racial" Production and the Social Unconscious of Blackface -- 3. White Kids and No Kids At All: Working Class Culture and Languages of Race -- 4. The Blackening of America: Popular Culture and National Cultures -- Part II -- 5. "The Seeming Counterfeit": Early Blackface Acts, the Body, and Social Contradiction -- 6. "Genuine Negro Fun": Racial Pleasure and Class Formation in the 1840's -- 7. California Gold and European Revolution: Stephen Foster and the American 1848 -- 8. Uncle Tomitudes: Racial Melodrama and Modes of Production -- Afterword to the 20th-Anniversary Edition by the Author -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195320558 20160612
For over two centuries, America has celebrated the very black culture it attempts to control and repress, and nowhere is this phenomenon more apparent than in the strange practice of blackface performance. Born of extreme racial and class conflicts, the blackface minstrel show sometimes usefully intensified them. Based on the appropriation of black dialect, music, and dance, minstrelsy at once applauded and lampooned black culture, ironically contributing to a "blackening of America." Drawing on recent research in cultural studies and social history, Eric Lott examines the role of the blackface minstrel show in the political struggles of the years leading up to the Civil War. Reading minstrel music, lyrics, jokes, burlesque skits, and illustrations in tandem with working-class racial ideologies and the sex/gender system, Love and Theft argues that blackface minstrelsy both embodied and disrupted the racial tendencies of its largely white, male, working-class audiences. Underwritten by envy as well as repulsion, sympathetic identification as well as fear-a dialectic of "love and theft"-the minstrel show continually transgressed the color line even as it enabled the formation of a self-consciously white working class. Lott exposes minstrelsy as a signifier for multiple breaches: the rift between high and low cultures, the commodification of the dispossessed by the empowered, the attraction mixed with guilt of whites caught in the act of cultural thievery.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195320558 20160612
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Book
155 pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 27 x 32 cm
In 1938 Hale Woodruff (1900-1980) accepted a commission to paint a series of murals for Talladega College, one of the nation's first colleges established for blacks after the Civil War. Installed in the institution's newly constructed library, the six murals portray noteworthy events in the rise of blacks in America from slavery to freedom. Today they stand out as provocative and relevant symbols of the centuries-long struggle for civil and human rights. Essays consider the development of the murals, their presence and significance at Talladega College, and Woodruff's impact on American mural painting in the years surrounding the Talladega project. An illustrated essay details all phases of the murals' conservation. Illustrated works span Woodruff's career and include oil studies; support materials such as prints, drawings, and photographs; and mural cycles he made in Mexico while studying with Diego Rivera. Stephanie Mayer Heydt is the Margaret and Terry Stent Curator of American Art at the High Museum of Art, Atlanta. Other contributors include Renee Ater, David C. Driskell, Larry Shutts, and Juliette Smith.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781932543469 20160609
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
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Book
xi, 515 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
  • Contents-- Acknowledgements-- Introduction, "Art in the Family" -- Kellie Jones PART ONE - ON DIASPORA Chapter 1 - Commentary, "Eyeminded" - Amiri Baraka-- Chapter 2 - Amiri Baraka, "Preface to a Twenty Volume Suicide Note-- Chapter 3 - A.K.A. Saartjie: The Hottentot Venus in Context (Some Reflections and a Dialogue)-- Chapter 4 - Tracey Rose: Post-Apartheid Playground-- Chapter 5 - (Un)Seen and Overheard: Pictures by Lorna Simpson-- Chapter 6 - Life's Little Necessities: Installation by Women in the 1990s-- Chapter 7 - Interview with Kcho (Alexis Leyva Machado)-- Chapter 8 - The Structure of Myth and the Potency of Magic PART TWO - IN VISIONING Chapter 9 - Commentary, "Seeing Through" - Hettie Jones-- Chapter 10 - Hettie Jones, "In the Eye of the Beholder" (1970s)-- Chapter 11 - To/From Los Angeles with Betye Saar-- Chapter 12 - Crown Jewels-- Chapter 13 - Dawoud Bey: Portraits in the Theater of Desire-- Chapter 14 - Pat Ward Williams: Photography and Social/Personal History-- Chapter 15 - Interview with Howardena Pindell-- Chapter 16 - Eye-Minded: Martin Puryear-- Chapter 17 - Large As Life: Contemporary Photography-- Chapter 18 - An Interview with David Hammons PART THREE - MAKING MULTICULTURALISM Chapter 19 - Commentary - Lisa Jones-- Chapter 20 - Lisa Jones, "How I Invented Multiculturalism" (1991)-- Chapter 21 - Lost in Translation: Jean-Michel in the (Re)Mix-- Chapter 22 - In the Thick of It: David Hammons and Hair Culture in the 1970s-- Chapter 23 - Domestic Prayer-- Chapter 24 - Critical Curators: Interview with Kellie Jones-- Chapter 25 - Poets of a New Style of Speak: Cuban Artists of this Generation-- Chapter 26 - In Their Own Image-- Chapter 27 - Tim Rollins and KOS: What's Wrong with this Picture-- Chapter 28 - Blues to the Future PART FOUR - ABSTRACT TRUTHS Chapter 29 - Commentary, "Them There Eyes: On Connections and the Visual" - Guthrie Ramsey-- Chapter 30 - Guthrie Ramsey, "Free Jazz and the Price of Black Musical Abstraction" (2006)-- Chapter 31 - To The Max: Energy and Experimentation-- Chapter 32 - It's Not Enough to Say 'Black is Beautiful': Abstraction at the Whitney 1969-1974-- Chapter 33 - Black West: Thoughts on Art in Los Angeles-- Chapter 34 - Brothers and Sisters-- Chapter 35 - Bill T. Jones-- Chapter 36 - Abstract Expressionism: The Missing Link-- Chapter 37 - Norman Lewis: The Black Paintings.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780822348733 20160605
A daughter of the poets Hettie Jones and Amiri Baraka, Kellie Jones grew up immersed in a world of artists, musicians, and writers in Manhattan's East Village, and absorbed in black nationalist ideas about art, politics, and social justice across the river in Newark. The activist vision of art and culture that she learned in those two communities, and especially from her family, have shaped her life and her work as an art critic and curator. Featuring selections of her writings from the past twenty years, EyeMinded reveals Jones's role in bringing attention to the work of African American, African, Latin American, and women artists who have challenged established art practices. Interviews that she conducted with the painter Howardena Pindell, the public installation and performance artist David Hammons, the Cuban sculptor Kcho (Alexis Leyva Machado), and the British critic Kobena Mercer appear along with pieces on the photographers Dawoud Bey, Lorna Simpson, and Pat Ward Williams; the sculptor Martin Puryear; the assemblage artist Betye Saar, and the painters Jean-Michel Basquiat, Norman Lewis, and Al Loving. Reflecting Jones's curatorial sensibility, this collection is structured as a dialogue between her writings and works by her parents, her sister Lisa Jones, and her husband Guthrie P. Ramsey Jr. EyeMinded offers a glimpse into the family conversation that shaped and sustained Jones, insight into the development of her critical and curatorial vision, and a survey of some of the most important figures in contemporary art.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780822348733 20160605
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
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Book
293 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 29 cm.
  • Introduction: "You can't always do things the same way" / Ruth Fine and Jacqueline Francis
  • Ralph Ellison's Romare Bearden / Darby English
  • Heroic moments of modernity: Romare Bearden, Carlos Enriquez, and the Poetic Lament / Rocio Aranda-Alvarado
  • Cold War diplomacy and the Civil Rights activism at the First World Festival of Negro Arts / Jody Blake
  • "We used to say stashed": Romare Bearden paints the blues / Robert G. O'Meally
  • Bearden, theater, film, dance / Richard A. Long
  • Bearden in The Crisis: illustrating identity and political action / Amy Helene Kirschke
  • Bearden's hands / Jacqueline Francis
  • Deep waters: rebirth, transcendence, and abstraction in Romare Bearden's Passion of Christ / Kymberly N. Pinder
  • Romare Bearden, an indelible imprint / David C. Driskell
  • Nurtured and necessary: mothers of invention / Ruth Fine
  • The woodshed / Richard J. Powell
  • Romare Bearden: on view / Bridget R. Cooks
  • Cultural legacies and the transformation of the Cubist Collage Aesthetic by Romare Bearden, Jacob Lawrence, and other African-American artists / Patricia Hills
  • The Negro artist's dilemma: Bearden, Picasso, and pop art / Pepe Karmel.
Romare Bearden (1911-1988) was a modernist artist renowned for his experimental and socially conscious works. Bearden is best known for his paintings and collages but also made significant contributions to the fields of printmaking, theatrical design, film, and other visual formats. While acknowledging the artist's place in African-American art history, where he has received his primary recognition, the fourteen essays collected in this volume seek to establish Bearden's role within the broader framework of American modernism in political, social, philosophical, and aesthetic contexts. These essays, written by distinguished scholars, track Bearden's cultural concerns and artistic evolution, from his early political cartoons to his important relationships with preeminent practitioners in the fields of literature, music, theater, and dance. His universal themes are viewed through multiple lenses, distinguishing him as a major figure of culturally and socially engaged modernism in the 20th century.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780300121612 20160605
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
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Book
118 p. : ill. (chiefly col.) ; 26 cm.
An essential figure in modern American art, William H. Johnson (1901-1970) was a virtuoso skilled in various media and techniques, who produced thousands of works over a career that spanned decades, continents, and genres. This volume considers paintings from the collection of Morgan State University in Baltimore, Maryland, that show the pivotal stages in Johnson's career as a modernist painter of post-impressionist and expressionist works reminiscent of Cezanne, Van Gogh, and Soutine, and the vernacular paintings in which he articulates his specific, unforgettable voice as an artist. In this lavishly illustrated book, some of the world's premier scholars of William H. Johnson and African American art history examine the artist and his artistic genius in fresh new ways, including his relationship with one of his earliest patrons, the Harmon Foundation; the critical role played by scholars at the nation's historically black colleges and universities; the context of Johnson's experiences living in Harlem and his deep southern roots; and Johnson as a trailblazer in the genres of still life and landscape painting. Richard J. Powell is the John Spencer Bassett Professor of Art and Art History at Duke University. Other contributors are Aaron Bryant, David C. Driskell, Leslie King-Hammond, and Lowery Stokes Sims.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780295991481 20160606
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
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xv, 207 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 26 cm.
In 1955, shortly after Emmett Till was murdered by white supremacists in Mississippi, his grieving mother distributed to the press a gruesome photograph of his mutilated corpse. Asked why she would do this, she explained that by witnessing with their own eyes the brutality of segregation and racism, Americans would be more likely to support the cause of racial justice. 'Let the world see what I've seen', was her reply. The publication of the photograph inspired a generation of activists to join the civil rights movement. Despite this extraordinary episode, the story of visual culture's role in the modern civil rights movement is rarely included in its history. This is the first comprehensive examination of the ways images mattered in the struggle, and it investigates a broad range of media including photography, television, film, magazines, newspapers, and advertising. These images were ever present and diverse: the startling footage of Southern white aggression and black suffering that appeared night after night on television news programmes; the photographs of black achievers and martyrs in Negro periodicals; the humble snapshot, no less powerful in its ability to edify and motivate. In each case, the war against racism was waged through pictures - millions of points of light, millions of potent weapons that forever changed a nation. Through vivid storytelling and incisive analysis, this powerful book allows us to see and understand the crucial role that visual culture played in forever changing a nation.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780300121315 20160604
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
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x, 354 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 27 cm.
  • Harlem's artistic community in the 1930s
  • Patrons and the making of a professional artist
  • African American storytelling : Toussaint l'Ouverture and Harriet Tubman
  • The great migration in memory, pictures, and text
  • Confrontations with the Jim Crow South in the 1940s
  • Home in Harlem : tenements and streets
  • The double consciousness of masks and masking
  • The paintings of the protest years, 1955-70.
Jacob Lawrence was one of the best-known African American artists of the twentieth century. In "Painting Harlem Modern", Patricia Hills renders a vivid assessment of Lawrence's long and productive career. She argues that his complex, cubist-based paintings developed out of a vital connection with a modern Harlem that was filled with artists, writers, musicians, and social activists. She also uniquely positions Lawrence alongside such important African American writers as Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, and Ralph Ellison. Drawing from a wide range of archival materials and interviews with artists, Hills interprets Lawrence's art as distilled from a life of struggle and perseverance. She brings insightful analysis to his work, beginning with the 1930s street scenes that provided Harlem with its pictorial image, and follows each decade of Lawrence's work, with accounts that include his impressions of Southern Jim Crow segregation and a groundbreaking discussion of Lawrence's symbolic use of masks and masking during the 1950s Cold War era. "Painting Harlem Modern" is an absorbing book that highlights Lawrence's heroic efforts to meet his many challenges while remaining true to his humanist values and artistic vision.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520252417 20160528
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
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xvii, 253 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 28 cm.
  • Foreword / Robert E. Hemenway
  • Directors' Foreword / Saralyn Reece Hardy and Victor D. Simmons
  • Introduction / Kinshasha Holman Conwill
  • Harlem, modernism, and beyond : Aaron Douglas and his role in art/history / Susan Earle
  • The Aaron Douglas effect / Richard J. Powell
  • Aaron Douglas: influences and impacts of the early years / Cheryl R. Ragar
  • Some observations on Aaron Douglas as tastemaker in the renaissance movement / David C. Driskell
  • Creating a "usable past" and a "future perfect society" : Aaron Douglas's murals for the 1936 Texas Centennial Exposition / Renée Ater
  • The fisk murals revealed: memories of Africa, hope for the future / Amy Helene Kirschke
  • Plates
  • Chronology / Stephanie Fox Knappe.
In paintings, murals, and book illustrations, Aaron Douglas (1899-1979) produced the most powerful visual legacy of the Harlem Renaissance, prompting the philosopher and writer Alain Locke to dub him the 'father of Black American art'. Working from a politicized concept of personal identity and a Utopian vision of the future, the artist made a lasting impact on American art history and on the nation's cultural heritage. Douglas' role, as well as that of the Harlem Renaissance in general, in the evolution of American modernism deserves close scholarly attention, which it finally receives in this beautifully illustrated book. Douglas combined angular Cubist rhythms and seductive Art Deco dynamism with traditional African and African American imagery. The result was a radically new Utopian visual vocabulary that evoked both current realities and hopes for a better future. Presenting more than ninety illustrations of Douglas' works and the commentary of leading critics and historians, this book focuses on the artist's career from the 1920s through the 1940s in relation to American modernism. Its authors argue that Douglas' bold work opened doors for African American artists in Harlem and beyond, and that it invited a dialogue with modernism that put African American life, labour, and freedom, along with African traditions and motifs, at its centre. New information emerges from these pages, reflecting the rich interchange between the visual arts, music, dance, literature, and politics that shaped Douglas' work and also defined the Harlem Renaissance.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780300121803 20160528
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
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19. Charles Alston [2007]

Book
x, 118 p. : ill. (chiefly col.) ; 29 cm.
  • Introduction
  • Enduring roots
  • Living the Renaissance
  • Modern life and modern art
  • A man for all seasons
  • An enduring narrative
  • Charles Alston chronology.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-193-01
Book
216 p. : ill. (chiefly col.) ; 30 cm.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
ARTHIST-193-01