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Book
xii, 263 pages : map ; 24 cm
  • Prologue. A journey to magnificent nature ... or why nature needs to be understood in translation
  • Introduction
  • Narratives of freedom
  • Populist cosmopolitanism
  • The co-modification of self
  • Gender in nature neverland
  • The interpretation of nature
  • The allure of ecology
  • Epilogue. Found in translation.
"Nature in Translation" is an ethnographic exploration in the cultural politics of the translation of knowledge about nature. Shiho Satsuka follows the Japanese tour guides who lead hikes, nature walks, and sightseeing bus tours for Japanese tourists in Canada's Banff National Park and illustrates how they aspired to become local "nature interpreters" by learning the ecological knowledge authorized by the National Park. The guides assumed the universal appeal of Canada s magnificent nature, but their struggle in translating nature reveals that our understanding of nature including scientific knowledge is always shaped by the specific socio-cultural concerns of the particular historical context. These include the changing meanings of work in a neoliberal economy, as well as culturally-specific dreams of finding freedom and self-actualization in Canada's vast nature. Drawing on nearly two years of fieldwork in Banff and a decade of conversations with the guides, Satsuka argues that knowing nature is an unending process of cultural translation, full of tensions, contradictions, and frictions. Ultimately, the translation of nature concerns what counts as human, what kind of society is envisioned, and who is included and excluded in the society as a legitimate subject.".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780822358800 20160618
Green Library
ANTHRO-110B-01, ANTHRO-210B-01
Book
xvi, 141 pages : illustrations, maps ; 23 cm
  • The day of Shelly's death
  • Notes on poetry and ethnography
  • Grief and a headhunter's ragelist of poems
  • October 11, 1981
  • Kakidugen, early September, 1981
  • Baguio, late August to early October, 1981
  • Kiangan, October 8-10, 1981
  • Mungayang, October 10, 1981
  • Mungayang, October 11, 1981
  • Lagawe, October 11, 1981
  • Night, October 11, 1981
  • The road, October 12, 1981
  • Baguio, October 12, 1981.
This deeply moving collection of poetry by Renato Rosaldo focuses on the shock of his wife Michelle (Shelly) Rosaldo's sudden death on October 11, 1981. Just the day before, Shelly and her family had arrived in the northern Philippines village of Mungayang, where she and her husband Renato, both accomplished anthropologists, planned to conduct fieldwork. On the eleventh of October, Shelly died after losing her footing and falling some sixty feet from a cliff into a swollen river. Renato Rosaldo explored the relationship between bereavement and rage in his canonical essay, "Grief and a Headhunter's Rage, " which first appeared in 1984 and is reprinted here. In the poems at the heart of this book, he returns to the trauma of Shelly's death through the medium of free verse, maintaining a tight focus on October 11, 1981. He explores not only his own experience of Shelly's death but also the imagined perspectives of many others whose lives intersected with that tragic event and its immediate aftermath, from Shelly herself to the cliff from which she fell, from the two young boys who lost their mother to the strangers who carried and cared for them, from a tricycle taxi driver, to a soldier, to priests and nuns. Photographs taken years earlier, when Renato and Shelly were conducting research across the river valley from Mungayang, add a stark beauty. In a new essay, "Notes on Poetry and Ethnography, " Rosaldo explains how and why he came to write the harrowing yet beautiful poems in The Day of Shelly's Death. More than anything else though, the essay is a manifesto in support of what he calls antropoesia, verse with an ethnographic sensibility. The essay clarifies how this book of rare humanity and insight challenges the limits of ethnography as it is usually practiced.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780822356493 20160612
Green Library
ANTHRO-110B-01, ANTHRO-210B-01
Book
224 p. : ill. ; 20 cm.
  • Business
  • Shelter
  • Food
  • Clothing
  • Work
  • Picking season
  • Education
  • Leisure
  • Health
  • Appendix 1. On Negroes
  • Appendix 2. Landowners.
On assignment for "Fortune" magazine in 1936, Agee and Evans set out to explore the plight of sharecroppers during the Great Depression. Published for the first time, Agee's original dispatch (accompanied by 25 of Evans' historic photographs) is an unsparing record of three families at a desperate time.
Green Library
ANTHRO-110B-01, ANTHRO-210B-01
Book
xi, 343 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Acknowledgments-- Notes on Orthography and Names Introduction Part I: Edgy Dispositions 1. To Be Emplaced: Fuzhounese Migration and the Geography of Desire-- 2. Stepping Out: Contesting the Moral Career from Peasant to Overseas Chinese Part II: Exits and Entrances 3. Snakeheads and Paper Trails: The Making of Exits-- 4. Bad Subjects: Human Smuggling, Legality, and the Problem of Entrance Part III: Debts and Diversions 5. For Use in Heaven or Hell: The Circulation of the U.S. Dollar among Gods, Ghosts, and Ancestors-- 6. Partings and Returns: Gender, Kinship, and the Mediation of Renqing Conclusion: When Fortune Flows Notes-- Bibliography-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780822348061 20160605
Year after year a woman sits in her bare living quarters with her bags packed. She is waiting for a phone call from her snakehead, or human smuggler. That longed-for call will send her out from her door, away from Fuzhou, China, on a perilous, illicit journey to the United States. Nothing diffuses the promise of an overseas destiny: neither the ever-increasing smuggling fee for successful travel (currently averaging $60,000) or her knowledge of the deadly risks in transit and the exploitative labour conditions abroad. The sense of imminent departure enchants her every move and overshadows the banalities of her present life. In this engrossing ethnographic account of how the Fuzhounese translate their desires for mobility into projects worth pursuing, Julie Y. Chu focuses on Fuzhounese efforts to recast their social horizons beyond the limitations of "peasant life" in China. Transcending utilitarian questions of risks and rewards, she considers the overflow of aspirations in the Fuzhounese pursuit of transnational destinations. Chu attends not just to the migration of bodies, but also to flows of shipping containers, planes, luggage, immigration papers, money, food, prayers, and gods. By analyzing the intersections and disjunctures of these various flows, she shows how mobility operates as a sign embodied through everyday encounters and the transactions of persons and things.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780822348061 20160605
Green Library
ANTHRO-110B-01, ANTHRO-210B-01
Book
359 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
  • Introduction: A Theory of Lumpen Abuse 1. Intimate Apartheid 2. Falling in Love 3. A Community of Addicted Bodies 4. Childhoods 5. Making Money 6. Parenting 7. Male Love 8. Everyday Addicts 9. Treatment Conclusion: Critically Applied Public Anthropology References Notes on the Photographs Acknowledgments.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520230880 20160528
This powerful study immerses the reader in the world of homelessness and drug addiction in the contemporary United States. For over a decade Philippe Bourgois and Jeff Schonberg followed a social network of two dozen heroin injectors and crack smokers on the streets of San Francisco, accompanying them as they scrambled to generate income through burglary, panhandling, recycling, and day labor. "Righteous Dopefiend" interweaves stunning black-and-white photographs with vivid dialogue, detailed field notes, and critical theoretical analysis.Its gripping narrative develops a cast of characters around the themes of violence, race relations, sexuality, family trauma, embodied suffering, social inequality, and power relations. The result is a dispassionate chronicle of survival, loss, caring, and hope rooted in the addicts' determination to hang on for one more day and one more 'fix' through a 'moral economy of sharing' that precariously balances mutual solidarity and interpersonal betrayal.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520230880 20160528
Green Library
ANTHRO-110B-01, ANTHRO-210B-01

6. Ordinary affects [2007]

Book
x, 133 p. ; 24 cm.
"Ordinary Affects" is a singular argument for attention to the affective dimensions of everyday life and the potential that animates the ordinary. Known for her focus on the poetics and politics of language and landscape, the anthropologist Kathleen Stewart ponders how ordinary impacts create the subject as a capacity to affect and be affected. In a series of brief vignettes combining storytelling, close ethnographic detail, and critical analysis, Stewart relates the intensities and banalities of common experiences and strange encounters, half-spied scenes and the lingering resonance of passing events. While most of the instances rendered are from Stewart's own life, she writes in the third person in order to reflect on how intimate experiences of emotion, the body, other people, and time inextricably link us to the outside world. Stewart refrains from positing a overarching system - whether it's called globalization or neoliberalism or capitalism - to describe the ways that economic, political, and social forces shape individual lives. Instead, she begins with the disparate, fragmented, and seemingly inconsequential experiences of everyday life to bring attention to the ordinary as an integral site of cultural politics. Ordinary affect, she insists, is registered in its particularities, yet it connects people and creates common experiences that shape public feeling. Through this anecdotal history - one that poetically ponders the extremes of the ordinary and portrays the dense network of social and personal connections that constitute a life - Stewart asserts the necessity of attending to the fleeting and changeable aspects of existence in order to recognize the complex personal and social dynamics of the political world.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780822341079 20160528
Green Library
ANTHRO-110B-01, ANTHRO-210B-01
Book
xi, 222 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
In February 1999 the tragic New York City police shooting of Amadou Diallo, an unarmed street vendor from Guinea, brought into focus the existence of West African merchants in urban America. In Money Has No Smell, Paul Stoller offers us a more complete portrait of the complex lives of West African immigrants like Diallo, a portrait based on years of research Stoller conducted on the streets of New York City during the 1990s. Blending fascinating ethnographic description with incisive social analysis. Stoller shows how these savvy West African entrepreneurs have built cohesive and effective multinational trading networks, in part through selling a simulated Africa to African Americans. These and other networks set up by the traders, along with their faith as devout Muslims, help them cope with the formidable state regulations and personal challenges they face in America. As Stoller demonstrates, the stories of these West African traders illustrate and illuminate ongoing debates about globalization, the informal economy, and the changing nature of American communities.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226775302 20160528
Green Library
ANTHRO-110B-01, ANTHRO-210B-01
Book
xxxix, 317 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Green Library
ANTHRO-210B-01, ANTHRO-110B-01
Book
394 p. illus. 22 cm.
Green Library
ANTHRO-110B-01, ANTHRO-210B-01
Book
vii, 271 p. : ill., plates, maps ; 23 cm.
Green Library
ANTHRO-110B-01, ANTHRO-210B-01