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Book
viii, 177 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction Chapter 1: Urban Parks in Iran Chapter 2: How Physical and Morphological Dimensions Affect Female Body in the Public Space Women-only vs. Gender Mixed Parks in Iran Chapter 3: Functional Dimensions of the Parks for Women Chapter 4: Women in Public Parks: Social Dimensions Chapter 5: How Women Perceive the Women-only Parks? "Safe Havens or Forbidden Zone Chapter 6: Public Urban Space, Female Body and Segregation: A Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781472473370 20161219
Public spaces are the renditions of the power symmetry within the social setting it resides in, and is both controlling and confining of power. In an ideologically-laden context, urban design encompasses values and meanings and is utilized as a means to construct the identity and perpetuate visible and invisible boundaries. Hence, gendered spatial dichotomy based on a biological division of sexes is often employed systematically to evade the transgression of women into the public spaces. The production of modern urban space in the Middle East is formed in the interplay between modernity, tradition and religion. Examining women in public spaces and patterns of interaction with gender -segregated and -mixed space, this book argues that gendered spaces are far from a static physical spatial division and produce a complex and dynamic dichotomy of men/public and women/private. Taking the example of Iran, normative and ideologically-laden gender segregated public spaces have been used as a tool for the Islamization of everyday life. The most recent government effort includes women-only parks, purportedly designed and administered through women's contributions, as well as to accommodate their needs and provide space for social interaction and activities. Combining research approaches from urban planning and social sciences, this book analyses both technical and social aspects of women-only parks. Addressing the relationships between ideology, urban planning and gender, the book interprets power relations and how they are used to define and plan public and semi-public urban spaces. Lack of communication across disciplinary boundaries as result of complexities of urban life has been one of the major hindrances in studying urban spaces in the Middle East. Addressing the concern, the cross-disciplinary approach employed in this volume is an amalgamation of methods informed by urban planning and social sciences, which includes an in-depth analysis of the morphological, perceptual, social, visual, functional, and temporal dimensions of the public space, the women-only parks in Iran. Based on critical ethnography, this volume uses a phenomenological approach to understating women in gendered spaces. Interaction of women in women-only parks in Iran, a gendered space which is growing in popularity across the Muslim world is discussed thoroughly and compared vis-a-vis gender-neutral public spaces. The book targets scholars and students within a wide range of academic disciplines including urban studies, urban planning, gender studies, political science, Middle Eastern studies, cultural studies, urban anthropology, urban sociology, Iranian studies and Islamic studies.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781472473370 20161219
Green Library
ANTHRO-108B-01, FEMGEN-108B-01, URBANST-108B-01
Book
222 p.
  • Introduction : masculinity in urban Egypt
  • Uncertain trajectories : the joys and sorrows of boyhood
  • Plans and stands : the challenge of being single at forty
  • Women and the making of proper men
  • Gendered violence : local and national articulations
  • Sickness, death, and a good ending
  • Conclusion : masculine trajectories and national paths.
Watching the revolution of January 2011, the world saw Egyptians, men and women, come together to fight for freedom and social justice. These events gave renewed urgency to the fraught topic of gender in the Middle East. The role of women in public life, the meaning of manhood, and the future of gender inequalities are hotly debated by religious figures, government officials, activists, scholars, and ordinary citizens throughout Egypt. Live and Die Like a Man presents a unique twist on traditional understandings of gender and gender roles, shifting the attention to men and exploring how they are collectively "produced" as gendered subjects. It traces how masculinity is continuously maintained and reaffirmed by both men and women under changing socio-economic and political conditions. Over a period of nearly twenty years, Farha Ghannam lived and conducted research in al-Zawiya, a low-income neighborhood not far from Tahrir Square in northern Cairo. Detailing her daily encounters and ongoing interviews, she develops life stories that reveal the everyday practices and struggles of the neighborhood over the years. We meet Hiba and her husband as they celebrate the birth of their first son and begin to teach him how to become a man; Samer, a forty-year-old man trying to find a suitable wife; Abu Hosni, who struggled with different illnesses; and other local men and women who share their reactions to the uprising and the changing situation in Egypt. Against this backdrop of individual experiences, Ghannam develops the concept of masculine trajectories to account for the various paths men can take to embody social norms. In showing how men work to realize a "male ideal, " she counters the prevalent dehumanizing stereotypes of Middle Eastern men all too frequently reproduced in media reports, and opens new spaces for rethinking patriarchal structures and their constraining effects on both men and women.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804783293 20160612
Green Library
ANTHRO-108B-01, FEMGEN-108B-01, URBANST-108B-01
Book
xiii, 195 p. : ill., map ; 24 cm.
This book offers a look at the new face of Cairo after economic liberalization. At the start of the twenty-first century, Cairo's cityscape has acquired a spectacular global touch. Its luxurious five-star hotels, high-rise office buildings, immaculately clean malls, and swanky coffee shops serving cafe latte and caesar salad, along with the budding gated communities in the city's desert expanses, exemplify three decades of economic liberalization. In the surrounding social landscape, the gradual abrogation of the Nasser-era structures that provided many with low-cost goods and services is dearly felt. This new study examines Cairo's experience of economic liberalization in an era of globalization. It asks what happened to a postcolonial middle class that was once the carrier of national aspirations and dreams. It explores how young middle-class professionals navigate Cairo's increasingly divided landscape and discusses the rise of a young upper-middle class presence in the work, leisure, and public spaces of the city.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789774162497 20160528
Green Library
ANTHRO-108B-01, FEMGEN-108B-01, URBANST-108B-01
Book
xiii, 279 p. ; 24 cm.
What happens when the market tries to help the poor? In many parts of the world today, neo-liberal development programs are offering ordinary people the tools of free enterprise as the means to well-being and empowerment. Schemes to transform the poor into small-scale entrepreneurs promise them the benefits of the market and access to the rewards of globalization. "Markets of Dispossession" is a theoretically sophisticated and sobering account of the consequences of these initiatives. Julia Elyachar studied the efforts of bankers, social scientists, NGO members, development workers, and state officials to turn the craftsmen and unemployed youth of Cairo into the vanguard of a new market society based on micro-enterprise.She considers these efforts in relation to the alternative notions of economic success held by craftsmen in Cairo, in which short-term financial profit was not highly valued. Through her careful ethnography of workshop life, Elyachar explains how the traditional market practices of craftsmen were among the most vibrant modes of market life in Egypt. Long condemned as backward, these existing market practices were seized on by social scientists and development institutions as the raw materials for experiments in "free market" expansion. Elyachar argues that the new economic value accorded to the cultural resources and social networks of the poor fueled a broader process of their economic, social, and cultural dispossession. Julia Elyachar is a Research Fellow at the Institute of Anthropological and Spatial Studies in the Scientific Research Centre of the Slovene Academy of Sciences and Arts in Ljubljana, Slovenia.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780822335832 20160528
Green Library
ANTHRO-108B-01, FEMGEN-108B-01, URBANST-108B-01
Book
xvii, 325 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
  • List of Figures Transcription and Transliteration Acknowledgments: Possession by Three Spirits Introduction: The Dialogic Enterprise of Women in Changing Social Contexts PART ONE. WOMEN IN THE MARKET 1. In the Place of the Market 2. Shtara: Competence in Cleverness 3. Words of Possession, Possession of Words: the Majduba 4. Words About Herbs: Feminine Performance of Oratory in the Marketplace 5. Reporting the New, Revoicing the Past' Marketplace Oratory and the Carnivalesque PART TWO. GENDER ON THE MARKET 6. Women on the Market: The Subversive Bride 7. Catering to the Sexual Market: Female Performers Defining the Social Body 8. Property in the (Other) Person: Mothers-in-Law, Working Women, and Maids 9. Terms of Talking Back: Women's Discourse on Magic 10. Conclusion: Hybridization and the Marketplace Appendix 1: Discourse of the Majduba Appendix 2: Discourse of the 'Ashshaba Glossary Bibliography Subject Index Author Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812214260 20160528
Selected by Choice magazine as an Outstanding Academic Book for 1996 Gender on the Market is a study of Moroccan women's expressive culture and the ways in which it both determines and responds to current transformations in gender roles. Beginning with women's emergence into what has been defined as the most paradigmatic of Moroccan male institutions-the marketplace-the book elucidates how gender and commodity relations are experienced and interpreted in women's aesthetic practices. Deborah Kapchan compellingly demonstrates that Moroccan women challenge some of the most basic cultural assumptions of their society-especially ones concerning power and authority.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812214260 20160528
Green Library
ANTHRO-108B-01, FEMGEN-108B-01, URBANST-108B-01
Book
333 p., [8] p. of plates : ill. ; 21 cm.
Green Library
ANTHRO-108B-01, FEMGEN-108B-01, URBANST-108B-01
Book
xxvii, 242 p. ; 22 cm.
Green Library
ANTHRO-108B-01, FEMGEN-108B-01, URBANST-108B-01