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Book
xxxix, 369 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
A groundbreaking contribution to the history of the ""long Civil Rights movement, "" Hammer and Hoe tells the story of how, during the 1930s and 40s, Communists took on Alabama's repressive, racist police state to fight for economic justice, civil and political rights, and racial equality. The Alabama Communist Party was made up of working people without a Euro-American radical political tradition: devoutly religious, semi-literate black laborers, sharecroppers, and a handful of whites, including unemployed industrial workers, housewives, youth, and renegade liberals. In this book, Robin D. G. Kelley reveals how the experiences and identities of these people from Alabama's farms, factories, mines, kitchens, and city streets shaped the Party's tactics and unique political culture. The result was a remarkably resilient movement forged in a racist world that had little tolerance for radicals. After discussing the book's origins and impact in a new preface written for this twenty-fifth-anniversary edition, Kelley reflects on what a militantly antiracist, radical movement in the heart of Dixie might teach contemporary social movements confronting rampant inequality, police violence, mass incarceration, and neoliberalism.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781469625485 20160618
Green Library
AMSTUD-268C-01, CSRE-268C-01, HISTORY-268C-01, HISTORY-368C-01
Book
ix, 503 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Lyndon Johnson's War on Poverty has long been portrayed as the most potent symbol of all that is wrong with big government. Conservatives deride the War on Poverty for corruption and the creation of "poverty pimps, " and even liberals carefully distance themselves from it. Examining the long War on Poverty from the 1960s onward, this book makes a controversial argument that the programs were in many ways a success, reducing poverty rates and weaving a social safety net that has proven as enduring as programs that came out of the New Deal.The War on Poverty also transformed American politics from the grass roots up, mobilizing poor people across the nation. Blacks in crumbling cities, rural whites in Appalachia, Cherokees in Oklahoma, Puerto Ricans in the Bronx, migrant Mexican farmworkers, and Chinese immigrants from New York to California built social programs based on Johnson's vision of a greater, more just society. Contributors to this volume chronicle these vibrant and largely unknown histories while not shying away from the flaws and failings of the movement--including inadequate funding, co-optation by local political elites, and blindness to the reality that mothers and their children made up most of the poor.In the twenty-first century, when one in seven Americans receives food stamps and community health centers are the largest primary care system in the nation, the War on Poverty is as relevant as ever. This book helps us to understand the turbulent era out of which it emerged and why it remains so controversial to this day.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780820339498 20160606
Green Library
AMSTUD-268C-01, CSRE-268C-01, HISTORY-268C-01, HISTORY-368C-01
Book
xiii, 210 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction : the face of welfare reform
  • Political culture and the public identity of the "welfare queen"
  • The news media : constructing the politics of disgust?
  • Public discourse in congress : haunted by ghosts of "welfare queens" past
  • Contending with the politics of disgust : public identity through welfare recipients' eyes
  • The dual threat : the impact of public identity and the politics of disgust on Democratic deliberation
  • Epilogue : public identity and the politics of disgust in the new millennium.
Ange-Marie Hancock argues that longstanding beliefs about poor African American mothers were the foundation for the contentious 1996 welfare reform debate that effectively "ended welfare as we know it." By examining the public identity of the so-called welfare queen and its role in hindering democratic deliberation, The Politics of Disgust shows how stereotypes and politically motivated misperceptions about race, class and gender were effectively used to instigate a politics of disgust. The ongoing role of the politics of disgust in welfare policy is revealed here by using content analyses of the news media, the 1996 congressional floor debates, historical evidence and interviews with welfare recipients themselves. Hancock's incisive analysis is both compelling and disturbing, suggesting the great limits of today's democracy in guaranteeing not just fair and equitable policy outcomes, but even a fair chance for marginalized citizens to participate in the process.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780814736586 20160528
Green Library
AMSTUD-268C-01, CSRE-268C-01, HISTORY-268C-01, HISTORY-368C-01
Book
xiii, 306 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Abbreviations-- Introduction-- PART I - BEGINNINGS-- 1. Creating "A Little Heaven for Poor People": Decent Housing and Respectable Communities-- 2. "A Woman Can Understand": Dissidence in 1940s Public Housing-- PART II - SHIFTING LANDSCAPES-- 3. Shifting Landscapes in Postwar Baltimore-- 4. "When Then Came the Change": The Fight Against Disrepute-- PART II - RESPECT, RIGHTS, AND POWER-- 5. "An Awakening Giant": The Search for Poor People's Political Power-- 6. "Sunlight at Early Dawn": Economic Struggles, Public Housing, and Welfare Rights-- Epilogue.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195306514 20160528
In this collective biography, Rhonda Y. Williams takes us behind, and beyond, politically expedient labels to provide an incisive and intimate portrait of poor black women in urban America. Drawing on dozens of interviews, Williams challenges the notion that low-income housing was a resounding failure that doomed three consecutive generations of post-war Americans to entrenched poverty. Instead, she recovers a history of grass-roots activism, of political awakening, and of class mobility, all facilitated by the creation of affordable public housing. The stereotyping of black women, especially mothers, has obscured a complicated and nuanced reality too often warped by the political agendas of both the left and the right, and has prevented an accurate understanding of the successes and failures of government anti-poverty policy.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195306514 20160528
Black women have traditionally represented the canvas on which many debates about poverty and welfare have been drawn. For a quarter century after the publication of the notorious Moynihan report, poor black women were tarred with the same brush: "ghetto moms" or "welfare queens" living off the state, with little ambition or hope of an independent future. At the same time, the history of the civil rights movement has all too often succumbed to an idolatry that stresses the centrality of prominent leaders while overlooking those who fought daily for their survival in an often hostile urban landscape. In this collective biography, Rhonda Y. Williams takes us behind, and beyond, politically expedient labels to provide an incisive and intimate portrait of poor black women in urban America. Drawing on dozens of interviews, Williams challenges the notion that low-income housing was a resounding failure that doomed three consecutive generations of post-war Americans to entrenched poverty. Instead, she recovers a history of grass-roots activism, of political awakening, and of class mobility, all facilitated by the creation of affordable public housing. The stereotyping of black women, especially mothers, has obscured a complicated and nuanced reality too often warped by the political agendas of both the left and the right, and has prevented an accurate understanding of the successes and failures of government anti-poverty policy. At long last giving human form to a community of women who have too often been treated as faceless pawns in policy debates, Rhonda Y. Williams offers an unusually balanced and personal account of the urban war on poverty from the perspective of those who fought, and lived, it daily.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195158908 20160528
Green Library
AMSTUD-268C-01, CSRE-268C-01, HISTORY-268C-01, HISTORY-368C-01
Book
xvii, 391 p. ; 24 cm.
  • The Poorhouse Era * The Origins and Failure of the Poorhouse Poverty * Outdoor Relief * The Theory and Practice of Scientific Charity * The Transformation of the Poorhouse Building The Semi-Welfare State * Saving Children * Reorganizing Cities * Reorganizing the Labor Market * Reorganizing the Nation From The War On Poverty To The War On Welfare * The War on Poverty and the Expansion of Social Welfare * The War on Welfare.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780465032105 20160528
With welfare reform a burning political issue, this special anniversary edition of the classic history of welfare in America has been revised and updated to include the latest bipartisan debates on how to end welfare as we know it. In the Shadow of the Poorhouse examines the origins of social welfare, both public and private, from the days of the colonial poorhouse through the current tragedy of the homeless. The book explains why such a highly criticized system persists. Katz explores the relationship between welfare and municipal reform; the role of welfare capitalism, eugenics, and social insurance in the reorganization of the labor market; the critical connection between poverty and politics in the rise of the New Deal welfare state; and how the War on Poverty of the 60s became the war on welfare of the 80s.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780465032105 20160528
Green Library
AMSTUD-268C-01, CSRE-268C-01, HISTORY-268C-01, HISTORY-368C-01