Book
xv, 169 p. : col. ill., col. map
  • Emerging Africa
  • Emerging Africa's renaissance
  • Emerging democracies
  • Stronger economic management
  • The end of the debt crisis and changing relationships with donors
  • The technology revolution
  • The "cheetah" revolution
  • Challenges and opportunities on the road ahead.
Emerging Africa describes the too-often-overlooked positive changes that have taken place in much of Africa since the mid-1990s. In 17 countries, five fundamental and sustained breakthroughs are making old assumptions increasingly untenable: * The rise of democracy brought on by the end of the Cold War and apartheid * Stronger economic management * The end of the debt crisis and a more constructive relationship with the international community * The introduction of new technologies, especially mobile phones and the Internet * The emergence of a new generation of leaders. With these significant changes, the countries of emerging Africa seem poised to lead the continent out of the conflict, stagnation, and dictatorships of the past. The countries discussed in the book are Botswana, Burkina Faso, Cape Verde, Ethiopia, Ghana, Lesotho, Mali Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zambia.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781933286518 20160604
Green Library
AFRICAST-109-01, AFRICAST-209-01
Book
ix, 246 p. ; 23 cm.
Green Library
AFRICAAM-111-01, AFRICAST-109-01, AFRICAST-209-01
Book
xx, 188 p. ; 24 cm.
There is no doubt: we want to help. The well-documented horrors of extreme poverty around the world have created a moral imperative that people have responded to in their millions. Yet the poverty persists. At a time of unprecedented global prosperity, children are starving to death. Are we not being generous enough? Or is the problem somehow insoluble, an inevitable outcome of historical circumstance? In this provocative and compelling book, Dambisa Moyo argues that the most important challenge we face today is to destroy the myth that Aid actually works. In the modern globalized economy, simply handing out more money, however well intentioned, will not help the poorest nations achieve sustainable long-term growth. "Dead Aid" analyses the history of economic development over the last fifty years and shows how Aid crowds out financial and social capital and feeds corruption; the countries that have 'caught up' did so despite rather than because of Aid. There is, however, an alternative. Extreme poverty is not inevitable. Dambisa Moyo shows how, with improved access to capital and markets and with the right policies, even the poorest nations can prosper. If we really do want to help, we have to do more than just appease our consciences, hoping for the best, expecting the worst. We need first to understand the problem.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781846140068 20160528
Green Library
AFRICAST-109-01, AFRICAST-209-01
Book
xxxvii, 458 p. : ill., ports. ; 25 cm. + 1 CD-ROM (4 3/4 in.)
  • Women in the pre-colonial and pre-Union periods: Chiefly women and women's leadership in pre-colonial southern Africa-- 'Like three tongues in one mouth' - tracing the elusive lives of slave women in (slavocratic) South Africa-- not a Nongqawuse story - an anti-heroine in historical perspective-- Women and gender in the South African War, 1899-1902. Women in early- to mid-twentieth century South Africa: 'Let them build more gaols'-- testimonies and transitions - women negotiating the rural and urban in the mid-20th century-- generations of struggle: trade unions and the roots of feminism, 1930-1960-- feminisms, motherisms, patriarchies and women's voices in the 1950s. War - armed and mass struggles as gendered experiences: Women in the ANC-led underground-- 'Another mother for peace' - women and peace building in South Africa, 1983-2003-- 'We were not afraid' - the role of women in the 1980's township uprising in the Eastern Cape-- women, labour and resistance - case studies from the Port Elizabeth/Uitenhage area, 1972-1994-- the 1990s - new identities, new victories, new struggles-- naked women's protest, July 1990 - 'We won't fuck for houses'-- loving in a time of hopelessness' - on township women's subjectivities in a time of HIV/AIDS-- invisible lives, inaudible voices? The social conditions of migrant women in Johannesburg-- ambiguity is my middle name - a research diary.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780796921741 20160528
In bringing alive the link between past and present, we find ways of imagining our future...In this fascinating collection, full of different textures, narratives and nuances, sixteen authors have begun to tackle the task of writing South Africa's history from an overtly feminist perspective, giving readers an opportunity to understand and reflect on debates about real women's power in completely new and fresh ways. Taking readers on an eclectic journey through the major themes of South African history from pre-colonial and pre-Union periods, through the terrors and struggles of the apartheid era to the present time, the authors have chosen not to be polite, but to interrogate issues, take them apart, turn things upside down. Readers are treated to a complete revision of the stories of Sarah Bartman and Xhosa prophetess Nongquawse; given a unique insight into the lives of slave women; the role of women in the early frontier wars; women's political struggles in the twentieth century; and on into the present with essays that deal with women's agency and current forms of protest and self representation. An exciting combination of seasoned and new voices, the book is intelligent, subtle, magisterial and unforgettable. Read it!.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780796921741 20160528
Green Library
AFRICAST-109-01, AFRICAST-209-01
Book
ca. 600 p. ; 20 cm
  • Leaf 1. Introduction
  • Leaf 2. Bibliographical references.
One direct response (a mirror response in a sense) to Mbeki's call on artists and thinkers to take up his utopian vision (termed "African Renaissance"), was offered by Andre Venter who published I Ching for the 'African Renaissance' in 2006. Before its publication a proof of concept work for the artists' book was exhibited at the Aardklop cultural festival and later at the University of Johannesburg. The exhibition curated by David Paton was entitled "Navigating the Bookscape". The work's position takes "renaissance" to mean: a radical change in "systems of thinking". Venter's comment through the "I Ching for the 'African Renaissance'" was complex (both aimed at material and symbolic practices), but it illustrated (in an empirical sense) how unlikely it was that radical change could occur in our "systems of thinking" in South Africa at the time of its publication. Venter showed — through this "limit-experience" — that to allow chance to play a role in the transformation of "govern-mentality" in South Africa was near impossible. The work posits chance as the only escape from a "system of thinking" which limits our ability to imagine alternatives to how we have come to think of ourselves as Africans. He did so by presenting President Mbeki's office with a leather bound, hand made copy of the artists' book — "I Ching for the 'African Renaissance' - and waits for a response. The soft cover (first edition) is out of print, but a digital version is available through the Internet Archive. An uncommon attribute of the publication is that it makes no claim to an Author. This strategy led both Wits University and the University of Johannesburg libraries to use derivatives of the publisher's name, as the author name, in order to classify the book.
Green Library
AFRICAST-109-01, AFRICAST-209-01
Book
xxvi, 483 p. ; 22 cm.
Green Library
AFRICAST-109-01, AFRICAST-209-01
Book
248 p.
  • 1. Introduction - Thandika Mkandawire-- -- Intellectuals, Pan-Africanism and nationalism - Culture and African intellectuals - Africa and Its Diaspora - Autonomous Intellectual Spaces. 2. African Intellectuals and Nationalism - Thandika Mkandawire-- - The Protagonists - Non-Organic intellectuals - Deafening Silence or Silent Struggle? - The Age of Delusion - The Decade of Extremes: Renaissance or Resignation? - The New Agenda?. 3. Pan-Africanism and the Intellectuals: Rise, Decline and Revival - Ali A. Mazrui-- - Pan-Africanism and the Intelligentsia - Erosion of Solidarity, Decline of Intellectualism - Towards a New Intellectual Revival - Pan-Africanism: Sub-Saharan and Trans-Saharan - Who Are the Afrabians? - Globalising the Dual Diaspora - Between African Americans and American Africans. 4. Intellectuals, Nationationalism and Panafricanism: A Testimony - Joseph Ki-Zerbo-- Nationalism - Pan-africanism - The role of intellectuals in generating the binomial driving force of the African renaissance. 5. Gender Studies for Africa's Transformation - Amina Mama-- - The Growth of Gender and Women's Studies in Africa - Gender Politics and Developmentalism - Shifting University Landscapes - Gender Politics in African Universities - Feminist Studies in Africa - Strengthening Gender Studies for Africa's Transformation - Challenges. 6. The character and formation of intellectuals within the ANC-led South African liberation movement - Raymond Suttner-- - Who are intellectuals in the context of the ANC-led South African liberation struggle? - ANC intellectuals - from a variety of sources - The Liberation movement as 'collective intellectual' - The ANC-led National Liberation Movement as creator of intellectuals - Intellectual role and processes of intellectual formation - Party/National liberation movement as 'collective intellectual' - The ANC acting as 'collective intellectual' through its strategy and tactics document of 1969 - Consensus and contestation in producing an intellectual product - New conjuncture after 1990 and again after 1994. 7. Europhone or African Memory: The Challenge of the Pan-Africanist Intellectual in the Era of Globalization - Ngugi wa Thiong'o. 8. The Language Question and National Development in Africa - Beban Sammy Chumbow-- - The Politics of Development and Underdevelopment - Development - Education, Language and National Development - The Use of African Languages in Education - The Language Factor in the Development of Science and Technology - African Languages and Inter-African Co-operation - Prospects and Perspectives. 9. Historians, Nationalism, and Pan-Africanism: Myths and Realities - Hannington Ochwada-- - African Historians and the Past at Independence - Critique of Nationalist Historiography: Which way Forward?. 10. The Academic Diaspora and Knowledge Production in and on Africa: What Role for CODESRIA? - Paul Tiyambe Zeleza-- - Defining and Debating African Diasporas - Contextualising the Academic Diasporas - Historicising Diasporic Academic Production and Linkages - Tendencies of the Contemporary Academic Diaspora - Conclusion: What Role for CODESRIA?
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781842776209 20160528
African intellectuals today face uniquely difficult circumstances - intolerant regimes, economies in sharp decline, societies wracked by violent conflict, and official languages that are not mother tongues. Compared with Asia or Latin America, Africa has experienced much higher rates of emigration of its intelligentsia to North America and Europe, and frequent displacement within the continent. This rare overview of their history, fate and future roles explores the relationship of African intellectuals to nationalism and the Pan African project; the indigenous language question; women intellectuals; and the role of the hugely growing African academic diaspora. It assesses the interface between African intellectuals and society, state and politics in the context of the restoration of multi-party politics, changing economic policies, and renewed Pan African awareness.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781842776209 20160528
Green Library
AFRICAST-109-01, AFRICAST-209-01
Book
19 p. ; 21 cm.
Green Library
AFRICAST-109-01, AFRICAST-209-01
Book
xii, 304 p. ; 22 cm.
Green Library
AFRICAST-109-01, AFRICAST-209-01
Book
v. <1 > ; 23 cm.
  • v. 1. The Intellectual Challenges.
Green Library
AFRICAST-109-01, AFRICAST-209-01
Book
328 p. ; 22 cm.
Green Library
AFRICAST-109-01, AFRICAST-209-01

12. On the postcolony [2001]

Book
274 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Achille Mbembe is one of the most brilliant theorists of post colonial studies writing today. In "On the Postcolony" he profoundly renews our understanding of power and subjectivity in Africa. In a series of provocative essays, Mbembe contests diehard Africanist and nativist perspectives as well as some of the key assumptions of post colonial theory. This thought-provoking and groundbreaking collection of essays - his first book to be published in English - develops and extends debates first ignited by his well-known 1992 article 'Provisional Notes on the Postcolony', in which he developed his notion of the 'banality of power' in contemporary Africa. Mbembe reinterprets the meanings of death, utopia, and the divine libido as part of the new theoretical perspectives he offers on the constitution of power. He works with the complex registers of bodily subjectivity - violence, wonder, and laughter - to profoundly contest categories of oppression and resistance, autonomy and subjection, and state and civil society that marked the social theory of the late twentieth century. This provocative book will surely attract attention with its signal contribution to the rich interdisciplinary arena of scholarship on colonial and post colonial discourse, history, anthropology, philosophy, political science, psychoanalysis, and literary criticism.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520204355 20160528
hdl.handle.net ACLS Humanities E-Book
Green Library
AFRICAST-109-01, AFRICAST-209-01

13. Home and exile [2000]

Book
x, 115 p. ; 21 cm.
  • MY HOME UNDER IMPERIAL FIRE-- THE EMPIRE FIGHTS BACK-- TODAY, THE BALANCE OF STORIES.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195135060 20160528
"Home and Exile" is a moving account of an exceptional life. Achebe reveals the inner workings of the human conscience throughout the predicament of Africa and his own intellectual life. It is a story of the triumph of the mind, told in words of one of the twentieth century's most gifted writers. Marked by a passionate commitment to political justice, "Home and Exile" brings to life Africa's first fraught encounters with Europe and the rest of the world while unflinchingly depicting the dark side of contemporary African political life.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195135060 20160528
Green Library
AFRICAST-109-01, AFRICAST-209-01
Book
317 p. ; 22 cm.
Green Library
AFRICAST-109-01, AFRICAST-209-01
Book
xxi, 467 p. ; 23 cm.
Green Library
AFRICAST-109-01, AFRICAST-209-01
Book
xxi, 467 p. ; 23 cm.
Green Library
AFRICAST-109-01, AFRICAST-209-01
Book
iii, 21 p. ; 20 cm.
Green Library
AFRICAST-109-01, AFRICAST-209-01
Book
xxii, 302 p. ; 23 cm.
Green Library
AFRICAST-109-01, AFRICAST-209-01
Book
xii, 353 p. ; 25 cm.
  • Acknowledgments Pt. IThe Structure of Power IIDecentralized Despotism IIIIndirect Rule: The Politics of Decentralized Despotism IVCustomary Law: The Theory of Decentralized Despotism VThe Native Authority and the Free Peasantry Pt. IIThe Anatomy of Resistance VIThe Other Face of Tribalism: Peasant Movements in Equatorial Africa VIIThe Rural in the Urban: Migrant Workers in South Africa VIIIConclusion: Linking the Urban and the Rural Notes Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691027937 20160528
In analysing the obstacles to democratisation in post-independence Africa, Mahmood Mamdani offers a bold, insightful account of colonialism's legacy - a bifurcated power that mediated racial domination through tribally organised local authorities, reproducing racial identity in citizens and ethnic identity in subjects. Many writers have understood colonial rule as either "direct" (French) or "indirect" (British), with a third variant - apartheid - as exceptional. This benign terminology, Mamdani shows, masks the fact that these were actually variants of a despotism. While direct rule denied rights to subjects on racial grounds, indirect rule incorporated them into a "customary" mode of rule, with state-appointed Native Authorities defining custom. By tapping authoritarian possibilities in culture, and by giving culture an authoritarian bent, indirect rule (decentralised despotism) set the pace for Africa; the French followed suit by changing from direct to indirect administration, while apartheid emerged relatively later. Apartheid, Mamdani shows, was actually the generic form of the colonial state in Africa. Through case studies of rural (Uganda) and urban (South Africa) resistance movements, we learn how these institutional features fragment resistance and how states tend to play off reform in one sector against repression in the other. Reforming a power that institutionally enforces tension between town and country, and between ethnicites, is the key challenge for anyone interested in democratic reform in Africa.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691011073 20160528
Green Library
AFRICAST-109-01, AFRICAST-209-01
Book
xv, 255 p. : ill., maps ; 22 cm.
Green Library
AFRICAST-109-01, AFRICAST-209-01