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Book
xiii, 322 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
  • Migrants' Routes, Ties, and Role in Empire, 1850s-1920s
  • Spirits of a Mobile World : Worship, Protection, and Threat at Home and Abroad, 1900s-1930s
  • Alien Everywhere : Immigrant Exclusion and Populist Bargains, 1920s-1930s
  • The Transnational Black Press and Questions of the Collective, 1920s-1930s
  • The Weekly Regge : Cosmopolitan Music and Race-Conscious Moves in a "World a Jazz," 1910s-1930s
  • The Politics of Return and Fractures of Rule in the British Caribbean, 1930-1940.
In the generations after emancipation, hundreds of thousands of African-descended working-class men and women left their homes in the British Caribbean to seek opportunity abroad: in the goldfields of Venezuela and the cane fields of Cuba, the canal construction in Panama, and the bustling city streets of Brooklyn. But in the 1920s and 1930s, racist nativism and a brutal cascade of antiblack immigration laws swept the hemisphere. Facing borders and barriers as never before, Afro-Caribbean migrants rethought allegiances of race, class, and empire. In "Radical Moves, " Lara Putnam takes readers from tin-roof tropical dancehalls to the elegant black-owned ballrooms of Jazz Age Harlem to trace the roots of the black-internationalist and anticolonial movements that would remake the twentieth century. From Trinidad to 136th Street, these were years of great dreams and righteous demands. Praying or "jazzing, " writing letters to the editor or letters home, Caribbean men and women tried on new ideas about the collective. The popular culture of black internationalism they created--from Marcus Garvey's UNIA to "regge" dances, Rastafarianism, and Joe Louis's worldwide fandom--still echoes in the present.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780807872857 20160615
Green Library
AFRICAAM-273C-01, CSRE-273-01, HISTORY-273C-01, HISTORY-373C-01
Book
xxxi, 319 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
  • List of Illustrations ix Foreword xi Maps xxiii Chapter One: From the Burro to the Subway 1 Chapter Two: Progreso Cannot Be Stopped 15 Chapter Three: Beautiful Barrios for the Humble Folk 44 Chapter Four: Yankee, Go Home ... and Take Me with You! 68 Chapter Five: Hispanic, Whatever That's Supposed to Mean 97 Chapter Six: To Have an Identity Here 132 Chapter Seven: Not How They Paint It 163 Chapter Eight: Strange Costumbres 200 Conclusion 243 Appendix: Population Change in the Dominican Republic 249 Notes 251 Selected Bibliography 297 Index 307.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691123387 20160528
In the second half of the twentieth century Dominicans became New York City's largest, and poorest, new immigrant group. They toiled in garment factories and small groceries, and as taxi drivers, janitors, hospital workers, and nannies. By 1990, one of every ten Dominicans lived in New York. "A Tale of Two Cities" tells the fascinating story of this emblematic migration from Latin America to the United States. Jesse Hoffnung-Garskof chronicles not only how New York itself was forever transformed by Dominican settlement but also how Dominicans' lives in New York profoundly affected life in the Dominican Republic. "A Tale of Two Cities" is unique in offering a simultaneous, richly detailed social and cultural history of two cities bound intimately by migration. It explores how the history of burgeoning shantytowns in Santo Domingo - the capital of a rural country that had endured a century of intense U.S. intervention and was in the throes of a fitful modernization - evolved in an uneven dialogue with the culture and politics of New York's Dominican ethnic enclaves, and vice versa. In doing so it offers a new window on the lopsided history of U.S.-Latin American relations. What emerges is a unique fusion of Caribbean, Latin American, and U.S. history that very much reflects the complex global world we live in today.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691123387 20160528
Green Library
AFRICAAM-273C-01, CSRE-273-01, HISTORY-273C-01, HISTORY-373C-01
Book
339 p. ; 22 cm.
Green Library
AFRICAAM-273C-01, CSRE-273-01, HISTORY-273C-01, HISTORY-373C-01
Book
xv, 341 p. : ill.
Puerto Ricans maintain a vibrant identity that bridges two very different places - the island of Puerto Rico and the U.S. mainland. Whether they live on the island, in the States, or divide time between the two, most imagine Puerto Rico as a separate nation and view themselves primarily as Puerto Rican. At the same time, Puerto Ricans have been U.S. citizens since 1917, and Puerto Rico has been a U.S. commonwealth since 1952. Jorge Duany uses previously untapped primary sources to bring new insights to questions of Puerto Rican identity, nationalism, and migration. Drawing a distinction between political and cultural nationalism, Duany argues that the Puerto Rican "nation" must be understood as a new kind of translocal entity with deep cultural continuities. He documents a strong sharing of culture between island and mainland, with diasporic communities tightly linked to island life by a steady circular migration. Duany explores the Puerto Rican sense of nationhood by looking at cultural representations produced by Puerto Ricans and considering how others - American anthropologists, photographers, and museum curators, for example - have represented the nation. His sources of information include ethnographic fieldwork, archival research, interviews, surveys, censuses, newspaper articles, personal documents, and literary texts.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780807827048 20160528
eReserve
AFRICAAM-273C-01, CSRE-273-01, HISTORY-273C-01, HISTORY-373C-01
Book
290 p.
Close to one million Cubans have fled to the United States since the 1959 revolution that brought Castro to power. This migration is one of the most fascinating and unusual in American history, involving a population of largely first-generation immigrants who have adapted economically and politically to American life while maintaining a distinct cultural identity. Maria Cristina Garcia - a Cuban refugee herself, who was raised in the Cuban community of Miami and experienced firsthand many of the developments she describes - has written the most comprehensive and revealing account of the postrevolutionary Cuban migration to date. As exiles, Cubans have tried to define what it means to be Cuban in a country other than Cuba. They have created hundreds of organisations to define and assert their "cubanidad". Miami has become the centre of Cuban creativity in the United States, home to some of Cuba's most important artists, writers, and intellectuals. Despite their original intentions, the emigres have become as American as they are Cuban. They have integrated into South Florida's labour market and created a vibrant business community that re-vitalised the local economy and has drawn other immigrants to the area. They have learned to work within the U.S. political system, and they now demonstrate political clout both in Miami and in Washington D.C. Garcia deftly navigates the waters of this negotiation between cultures. Focusing on the community in south Florida, where over half of the emigres make their homes, she investigates the cultural, economic, and political evolution of this hybrid society. Her exploration of the complicated realm of Cuban American identity sets a new standard in social and cultural history.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520201316 20160528
Green Library
AFRICAAM-273C-01, CSRE-273-01, HISTORY-273C-01, HISTORY-373C-01
Book
viii, 242 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
Green Library
AFRICAAM-273C-01, CSRE-273-01, HISTORY-273C-01, HISTORY-373C-01
Book
324 p. ; 21 cm.
Green Library
AFRICAAM-273C-01, CSRE-273-01, HISTORY-273C-01, HISTORY-373C-01