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Book
231 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 21 cm
This is the first English translation of an important document in the history of the black presence in Germany and Europe: the autobiography of Theodor Michael. Theodor Michael is among the few surviving members of the first generation of 'Afro-Germans': Born in Germany in 1925 to a Cameroonian father and a German mother, he grew up in Berlin in the last days of the Weimar Republic. As a child and teenager he worked in circuses and films and experienced the tightening knot of racial discrimination under the Nazis in the years before the Second World War. He survived the war as a forced labourer, founding a family and making a career as a journalist and actor in post-war West Germany. Since the 1980s he has become an important spokesman for the black German consciousness movement, acting as a human link between the first black German community of the inter-war period, the pan-Africanism of the 1950s and 1960s, and new generations of Germans of African descent. Theodor Michael's life story is a classic account of coming to consciousness of a man who understands himself as both black and German; accordingly, it illuminates key aspects of modern German social history as well as of the post-war history of the African diaspora. The text has been translated by Eve Rosenhaft, Professor of German Historical Studies at the University of Liverpool and an internationally acknowledged expert in Black German studies. It is accompanied by a translator's preface, explanatory notes, a chronology of historical events and a guide to further reading, so that the book will be accessible and useful both for general readers and for undergraduate students.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781781383117 20170530
Green Library
AFRICAAM-165G-01, CSRE-165I-01, GERMAN-165-01
Book
96 pages ; 21 cm.
Green Library
AFRICAAM-165G-01, CSRE-165I-01, GERMAN-165-01
Book
253 pages : illustrations ; 21 cm
Green Library
AFRICAAM-165G-01, CSRE-165I-01, GERMAN-165-01
Book
93 pages ; 21 cm.
Green Library
AFRICAAM-165G-01, CSRE-165I-01, GERMAN-165-01
Book
95 pages : illustrations ; 21 cm.
  • Portraits. Nouria
  • Saba
  • Pasquale
  • Christelle
  • Anna
  • Akiiki
  • Nali
  • Sonia
  • Gonza
  • Bona
  • Maisha
  • Clementine. Essay. But some of us are brave : the legacy of black female activists in Germany / Sharon Dodua Otoo.
Green Library
AFRICAAM-165G-01, CSRE-165I-01, GERMAN-165-01
Book
x, 260 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
  • List of Figures Acknowledgments Introduction Mischa Honeck, Martin Klimke, and Anne Kuhlmann PART I: SAINTS AND SLAVES, MOORS AND HESSIANS Chapter 1. The Calenberg Altarpiece: Black African Christians in Renaissance Germany Paul Kaplan Chapter 2. The Black Diaspora in Europe in the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Centuries, with Special Reference to German-Speaking Areas Kate Lowe Chapter 3. Ambiguous Duty: Black Servants at German Ancien Regime Courts Anne Kuhlmann Chapter 4. Real and Imagined Africans in German Court divertissements Rashid-S. Pegah Chapter 5. From American Slaves to Hessian Subjects: Silenced Black Narratives of the American Revolution Maria Diedrich PART II: FROM ENLIGHTENMENT TO EMPIRE Chapter 6. The German Reception of African American Writers in the Long Nineteenth Century Heike Paul Chapter 7. "On the Brain of the Negro": Race, Abolitionism, and Friedrich Tiedemann's Scientific Discourse on the African Diaspora Jeannette Eileen Jones Chapter 8. Liberating Sojourns? African American Travelers in Mid-Nineteenth-Century Germany Mischa Honeck Chapter 9. Global Proletarians, Uncle Toms and Native Savages: The Antinomies of Black Identity in Nineteenth-Century Germany Bradley Naranch Chapter 10. We Shall Make Farmers of Them Yet: Tuskegee's Uplift Ideology in German Togoland Kendahl Radcliffe Chapter 11. Education and Migration: Cameroonian School Children and Apprentices in the German Metropole, 1884-1914 Robert Aitken Afterword: Africans in Europe: New Perspectives Dirk Hoerder Select Bibliography Notes on Contributors Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780857459534 20160612
The rich history of encounters prior to World War I between people from German-speaking parts of Europe and people of African descent has gone largely unnoticed in the historical literature - not least because Germany became a nation and engaged in colonization much later than other European nations. This volume presents intersections of Black and German history over eight centuries while mapping continuities and ruptures in Germans' perceptions of Blacks. Juxtaposing these intersections demonstrates that negative German perceptions of Blackness proceeded from nineteenth-century racial theories, and that earlier constructions of "race" were far more differentiated. The contributors present a wide range of Black - German encounters, from representations of Black saints in religious medieval art to Black Hessians fighting in the American Revolutionary War, from Cameroonian children being educated in Germany to African American agriculturalists in Germany's protectorate, Togoland. Each chapter probes individual and collective responses to these intercultural points of contact.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780857459534 20160612
Green Library
AFRICAAM-165G-01, CSRE-165I-01, GERMAN-165-01
Video
1 videodisc (approximately 79 min.) : sound, color ; 4 3/4 in.
"Audre Lorde - the Berlin Years 1984 to 1992 documents Audre Lorde's influence on the German political and cultural scene during a decade of profound social change, a decade that brought about the fall of the Berlin Wall and the re-unification of East and West Germany. This chronicles an untold chapter of Lorde's life: her empowerment of Afro-German women, as she challenged white women to acknowledge the significance of their white privilege and to deal with difference in constructive ways."--Http://www.audrelorde-theberlinyears.com/berlin.html.
Media & Microtext Center
AFRICAAM-165G-01, CSRE-165I-01, GERMAN-165-01
Video
1 videodisc (80 min.) : sound, color with black and white sequences ; 4 3/4 in. Sound: digital; optical. Dolby Digital. Video: NTSC. Digital: video file; DVD video; region 1.
  • Special features : Interview with director Dagmar Schultz
  • trailer
  • music clip "Audre Lorde"
  • Audre reading her poems
  • Audre in Berlin
  • Audre on her work
  • deleted scenes.
Audre Lorde's incisive, often-angry, but always brilliant writings and speeches defined and inspired the US-American feminist, lesbian, African-American, and Women-of-Color movements of the 1970s and 1980s. Audre Lorde, the Berlin Years 1984 to 1992, documents an untold chapter of Lorde's life: her influence on the German political and cultural scene during a decade of profound social change. The film explores the importance of Lorde's legacy, as she encouraged Afro-Germans -- who, at that time, had no name or space for themselves -- to make themselves visible within a culture that until then had kept them isolated and silent. It chronicles Lorde's empowerment of Afro-German women to write and to publish, as she challenged white women to acknowledge the significance of their white privilege and to deal with difference in constructive ways. Previously unreleased archive material as well as present-day interviews explore the lasting influence of Lorde's ideas on Germany and the impact of her work and personality. For the first time, Dagmar Schultz's personal archival video- and audio-recordings reveal a significant part of the private Audre Lorde as well as her agenda -- to rouse Afro-Germans to recognize each other. 2012 marks the 20-year anniversary of Audre Lorde's passing.
Media & Microtext Center
AFRICAAM-165G-01, CSRE-165I-01, GERMAN-165-01
Video
1 videodisc (approximately 28 min.) : sound, color ; 4 3/4 in. Sound: digital; optical. Digital: video file; DVD video.
A profile of the life and work of Afro-German poet May Ayim, including interview footage and performances at a festival in Johannesburg, South Africa in 1995. Born in Ghana in 1960, Ayim grew up and studied in Germany to become author, poet and a prominent activist in the Black German movement.
Media & Microtext Center
AFRICAAM-165G-01, CSRE-165I-01, GERMAN-165-01
Book
179 p. ; 21 cm.
Green Library
AFRICAAM-165G-01, CSRE-165I-01, GERMAN-165-01
Book
158 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.
Placed in an orphanage at the age of 7 because she was an "occupational child" - her father being an African American serviceman serving in Germany who had no part in her upbringing - the author recounts her life and her journey from Berlin to Chicago to discover a family she had never known.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780826412942 20160527
Green Library
AFRICAAM-165G-01, CSRE-165I-01, GERMAN-165-01

12. Dreckfresser [2000]

Video
1 videodisc (73 min.) : sound, color ; 4 3/4 in. Sound: digital; optical; Dolby digital surround. Video: NTSC. Digital: video file; DVD video; region ALL.
Sam Meffire, son of a German mother and black Cameroon father, was a policeman in Saxony. A national advertising campaign used him as a symbol of a multicultural, integrated East Germany. Life became ever more complicated for the young man. He left the police force, started a private security firm, and turned to crime.
Media & Microtext Center
AFRICAAM-165G-01, CSRE-165I-01, GERMAN-165-01
Book
239 p.
Green Library
AFRICAAM-165G-01, CSRE-165I-01, GERMAN-165-01