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Book
volumes : color illustrations ; 26 cm
  • bk. 1. [#1-4]
  • bk. 2. [#5-8]
  • bk. 3. [#9-12]
Written by MacArthur Genius and National Book Award winner Ta-Nehisi Coates (“Between the World and Me”) and illustrated by living legend Brian Stelfreeze, “A Nation Under Our Feet” is a story about dramatic upheaval in Wakanda and the Black Panther's struggle to do right by his people as their ruler. The indomitable will of Wakanda--the famed African nation known for its vast wealth, advanced technology, and warrior traditions--has long been reflected in the will of its monarchs, the Black Panthers. But now the current Black Panther, T'Challa, finds that will tested by a superhuman terrorist group called the People that has sparked a violent uprising among the citizens of Wakanda. T'Challa knows the country must change to survive--the question is, will the Black Panther survive the change? Publisher.
Green Library, Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
AFRICAAM-124F-01, CSRE-124F-01
Book
370 pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 26 cm.
Green Library
AFRICAAM-124F-01, CSRE-124F-01

3. Octavia E. Butler [2016]

Book
xviii, 225 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
I began writing about power because I had so little, Octavia E. Butler once said. Butler's life as an African American woman--an alien in American society and among science fiction writers--informed the powerful works that earned her an ardent readership and acclaim both inside and outside science fiction. Gerry Canavan offers a critical and holistic consideration of Butler's career. Drawing on Butler's personal papers, Canavan tracks the false starts, abandoned drafts, tireless rewrites, and real-life obstacles that fed Butler's frustrations and launched her triumphs. Canavan departs from other studies to approach Butler first and foremost as a science fiction writer working within, responding to, and reacting against the genre's particular canon. The result is an illuminating study of how an essential SF figure shaped themes, unconventional ideas, and an unflagging creative urge into brilliant works of fiction.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780252082160 20170117
Green Library
AFRICAAM-124F-01, CSRE-124F-01
Video
1 videodisc (45 min.) : sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in.
Explores the relationships between Pan-African culture, science fiction, space exploration, and computer technology. Examines science fiction elements in literature and music as metaphors for the Pan-African experience of forced displacement and cultural alienation.
Media & Microtext Center
AFRICAAM-124F-01, CSRE-124F-01
Book
xi, 314 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
In "Blutopia" Graham Lock studies the music and thought of three pioneering twentieth-century musicians: Sun Ra, Duke Ellington, and Anthony Braxton. Providing an alternative to previous analyses of their work, Lock shows how these distinctive artists were each influenced by a common musical and spiritual heritage and participated in self-conscious efforts to create a utopian vision of the future. A century after Ellington's birth, Lock reassesses his use of music as a form of black history and compares the different approaches of Ra, a band leader who focused on the future and cosmology, and Braxton, a contemporary composer whose work creates itw own elaborate mythology.Arguing that the majority of writing on black music and musicians has-even if inadvertently-incorporated racial stereotypes, he explains how each artist reacted to criticism and sought to break free of categorical confines. Drawing on social history, musicology, biography, cultural theory, and, most of all, statements by the musicians themselves, Lock writes of their influential work."Blutopia" will be a welcome contribution to the literature on twentieth-century African American music and creativity. It will interest students of jazz, American music, African American studies, American culture, and cultural studies. ""Blutopia" ...is a discerning account of the battles over utopia in the jazz world ...[Lock's] achievement is to take the musicians seriously as theorists in their own right, then to draw them into the meshes of African-American musical and spiritual traditions...Lock's insights however, also whet the reader's appetite for an appraisal of the music itself ...Future scholars will have to find a language that can develop his blutopian premisses and bring them to a musical conclusion." - "Times Literary Supplement", 27 October 2000.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780822324041 20160528
Green Library
AFRICAAM-124F-01, CSRE-124F-01

6. Dhalgren [1975]

Book
xiii, 801 p. ; 22 cm.
Green Library
AFRICAAM-124F-01, CSRE-124F-01
Book
285 p. ; 22 cm.
Green Library
AFRICAAM-124F-01, CSRE-124F-01