1. Warehouses: Kenya, 2011 [2012] Online

Map
0.003
Collection
Kenya GIS Data
This point shapefile contains the locations of warehouses in Kenya for 2011. Data were acquired from the National Cereals and Produce Board (NCPB) in Kenya.
This layer is intended for researchers, students, and policy makers for reference and mapping purposes, and may be used for basic applications such as viewing, querying, and map output production, or to provide a basemap to support graphical overlays and analysis with other spatial data.

2. Warehouses: Kenya, 2012 [2012] Online

Map
0.002
Collection
Kenya GIS Data
This point shapefile contains the locations of warehouses in Kenya for 2012. Data were acquired from the World Food Programme.
This layer is intended for researchers, students, and policy makers for reference and mapping purposes, and may be used for basic applications such as viewing, querying, and map output production, or to provide a basemap to support graphical overlays and analysis with other spatial data.
Map
0.579
Collection
Kenya GIS Data
This polygon shapefile portrays annual projected water balance by subdrainage area in Kenya for 2000 and 2010. The data was taken from the Kenya National Water Master Plan (1992) and joined by sub-basin. Land areas with negative water balances (where water supply is outstripped by demand) will require investment in water resource infrastructure to cover their needs.
This data was used in Map 3.7 in Nature's Benefits in Kenya: An Atlas of Ecosystems and Human Well-Being.
Map
6.982
Collection
Kenya GIS Data
This polygon shapefile represents the average number of crops grown in croplands of central and western Kenya, 1997. This map combines detailed crop information from 5,747 aerial photos for a growing season in 1997, each providing a sample point of detailed crop information. These samples are averaged to spatial units (polygons) of crop - lands from Kenya’s most recent land cover map (FAO 2000). These averages represent conservative estimates. The raw data indicate that in some sample points farmers grow up to eight different crop species simultaneously.
This data was used in Map 5.5 in Nature's Benefits in Kenya: An Atlas of Ecosystems and Human Well-Being.
Map
0.37
Collection
Kenya GIS Data
This polygon shapefile represents the average water consumption of livestock and wildlife by sub-basin in Kenya for 1994-96. The greatest water demand from livestock occurs in the surveyed subdrainages of the Lake Victoria drainage area near Tanzania. Wildlife demand for water is also high in this area, mostly because of the number of animals within and close to a large protected area (Masai Mara). The subdrainages north of Mount Kenya (Ewaso Ngiro North drainage) also have significant water demand because of the high number of wildlife species.
This data was used in Map 3.13 in Nature's Benefits in Kenya: An Atlas of Ecosystems and Human Well-Being.
Map
0.003
Collection
Kenya GIS Data
This point shapefile depicts the capacity, or number of beds, for major tourist hotels on the eastern coast of Kenya. These data were caluclated by the International Livestock Research Institute based on data sources from the United National Environmental Programme and the Republic of Kenya.
This data was used in Map 6.4 and Map 6.5 in Nature's Benefits in Kenya: An Atlas of Ecosystems and Human Well-Being.
Map
0.016
Collection
Kenya GIS Data
This polygon shapefile portrays the spatial distribution of buffalo numbers observed in Kenya from 1994 to 1996. Wildlife counts came from a rangeland census using low altitude flights. Animals are aggregated to squares of 5 kilometers by 5 kilometers.
This data was used in Map 6.2 in Nature's Benefits in Kenya: An Atlas of Ecosystems and Human Well-Being.
Map
1.233
Collection
Kenya GIS Data
This polygon shapefile shows changes in wildlife density in Kenya's rangelands between 1977-78 and 1994-96. Many places in Kenya experienced gains in wildlife density between the 1970s and the 1990s, with sites of most rapid recovery concentrated in southwest Narok District, near the Masai Mara Game Reserve; in Kajiado District, near Amboseli National Park; in Laikipia District, northwest of Mount Kenya National Park; and in selected areas near the coast in Lamu District. Sites with sharp declines in wildlife density are found throughout large parts of central Narok District, south of Nairobi in Kajiado District, northern Laikipia District, locations along the Samburu-Laikipia border, and in Isiolo and Garissa Districts near the Wajir border. Note: To estimate changes in wildlife densities, species numbers are aggregated (using TLUs) to squares of 10 km by 10 km and then averaged by square kilometer for each reference period. The wildlife counts include 21 different large grazing animals that can be observed during low-altitude flights.
This data was used in Map 5.12 in Nature's Benefits in Kenya: An Atlas of Ecosystems and Human Well-Being.

9. Dams: Mombasa, Kenya, 1992 [2007] Online

Collection
Kenya GIS Data
This point shapefile shows the locations of dams serving Mombasa, Kenya. Data were compiled by WRI from 1:50,000 topographic maps and other sources.
This data was used in Map 3.10 in Nature's Benefits in Kenya: An Atlas of Ecosystems and Human Well-Being.

10. Dams: Nairobi, Kenya, 2003 [2007] Online

Collection
Kenya GIS Data
This point shapefile shows the locations of dams serving Nairobi, Kenya. Data were compiled by WRI from 1:50,000 topographic maps and other sources.
This data was used in Map 3.9 in Nature's Benefits in Kenya: An Atlas of Ecosystems and Human Well-Being.
Map
0.018
Collection
Kenya GIS Data
This polygon shapefile portrays the spatial distribution of elephant numbers observed in Kenya from 1994 to 1996. Wildlife counts came from a rangeland census using low altitude flights. Animals are aggregated to squares of 5 kilometers by 5 kilometers..
This data was used in Map 6.2 in Nature's Benefits in Kenya: An Atlas of Ecosystems and Human Well-Being.
Map
8.98
Collection
Kenya GIS Data
This polygon shapefile depicts the share of cropland that is dedicated to food crops, irrespective of the overall intensity of cultivation. By using only two categories (food and nonfood) and grouping the data into four broad data ranges, the map is relatively robust to the seasonal changes in specific crop choices caused by differences in rainfall, prices, demand, and labor availability. Spatial patterns of food cropping do not necessarily mirror those of cropland intensity. Areas where more than 75 percent of farmers’ cropland is dedicated to food crop are concentrated in high-potential Districts such as Trans Nzoia, Uasin Gishu, Lugari, upper Nandi, and Nakuru (maize and other cereals); Narok (wheat); and lower Kirinyaga (rice). High food-crop shares also occur in more marginal cropping areas such as the Districts bordering Lake Victoria and large parts of Machakos and Makueni Districts (but here low-yielding maize is the major contributor). The lowest shares of food crops (25 percent) cover the tea-growing areas along the Aberdare Range; Mount Kenya; and parts of eastern Bomet, Buret, Kericho, and Nyamira Districts. Areas with a food share of 25-50 percent include the coffee-growing zones of the Aberdare Range and Mount Kenya in Central Province. In the west, for example, in Siaya, Kakamega, and Migori Districts, low shares of food crops are typically paired with sugarcane or tobacco crops. Areas with low shares of food crops in Kitui District may be temporary, reflecting large shares of fallow cropland during the 1997 season of the aerial surveys.
This data was used in Map 4.4 in Nature's Benefits in Kenya: An Atlas of Ecosystems and Human Well-Being.
Map
0.092
Collection
Kenya GIS Data
This polygon shapefile portrays the spatial distribution of giraffe numbers observed in Kenya from 1994 to 1996. Wildlife counts came from a rangeland census using low altitude flights. Animals are aggregated to squares of 5 kilometers by 5 kilometers.
This data was used in Map 6.2 in Nature's Benefits in Kenya: An Atlas of Ecosystems and Human Well-Being.
Map
0.002
Collection
Kenya GIS Data
This polygon shapefile depicts Important Bird Areas (IBAs) and their status in Kenya, 2003-2004. The data depicts each IBA by a point in the center of its associated area. IBAs range from 1 hectare to more than 1 million hectares in size. This layer identifies 60 IBAs in Kenya covering some 5.7 million hectares (10 percent of the country’s land area). These areas play a critical role in ensuring the survival of local and migratory bird species. Of these 60 sites, only 35 are located inside parks, sanctuaries, reserves, or other protected areas. Thus, the survival of local and migratory species relies heavily on coexistence with people in landscapes that have been significantly altered by human activities. A recent assessment of the conservation status of Kenya’s IBAs indicated that many are in decline—a finding that bodes ill for Kenya’s rich bird diversity. Indeed, some 27 bird species in Kenya have been listed as “critically endangered, endangered, or vulnerable.”
This data was used in Map 5.3 in Nature's Benefits in Kenya: An Atlas of Ecosystems and Human Well-Being.
Collection
Kenya GIS Data
This polygon shapefile shows the locations of large hydropower dams in Kenya. Dams were located based on existing data from the Geological Survey of Kenya (1971) and KenGen (2006). Hydropower dams, although contributing significantly to economic development and human well-being, can have negative impacts on populations and ecosystems as well. Dams can affect downstream water supply, displace people, ruin aesthetic and sometimes spiritual landmarks such as waterfalls, and increase threats to fish and other species that depend on rivers for their habitat.
This data was used in Map 3.11 in Nature's Benefits in Kenya: An Atlas of Ecosystems and Human Well-Being.
Map
2.989
Collection
Kenya GIS Data
This polygon shapefile portrays livestock density in Kenya's rangelands for 1994-96. Most of Kenya’s rangelands contain livestock. Higher livestock numbers can be found in the wetter part of the rangelands and closer to permanent water sources. Livestock densities in large parts of the northeastern rangelands reflect pastoral production systems where herders move livestock periodically to follow the seasonal supply of water and feed. In a number of locations in Narok, Kajiado, and Laikipia Districts, high wildlife and livestock densities coincide.
This data was used in Map 1.5 and Map 4.7 in Nature's Benefits in Kenya: An Atlas of Ecosystems and Human Well-Being.
Map
4.173
Collection
Kenya GIS Data
This polygon shapefile shows the percentage of woodlots in sampled cropland in central and western Kenya, 1997. Areas with higher percentages of woodlots cluster more extensively in the foothills of the Aberdare Range and Mount Kenya, and in most communities of Central Kisii, Nyamira, and Buret Districts. A relatively large area of the upper parts of Maragua and Muranga Districts is covered by cropland where woodlots cover more than 12 percent of the land. Close proximity to densely settled rural and urban areas, as well as other centers of high wood demand (for example, tea production) are among the factors behind these spatial patterns. The share of woodlots is much lower in the western parts of the country. Farmers also do not plant woodlots in the more marginal cropping areas with lower rainfall, such as Makueni, Kitui, Mbeere, or Tharaka Districts. Note that these farmers may still plant trees for other purposes and that woodlots are only one of many sources for firewood (other sources include vegetation used to demarcate boundaries, or vegetation on cropland).
This data was used in Map 7.3 in Nature's Benefits in Kenya: An Atlas of Ecosystems and Human Well-Being.
Map
0.001
Collection
Kenya GIS Data
This point shapefile contains locations of proposed small micro-hydropower sites in Kenya.
This data was used in Map 3.11 in Nature's Benefits in Kenya: An Atlas of Ecosystems and Human Well-Being.
Map
0.003
Collection
Kenya GIS Data
This point shapefile cotains locations of tourist accomodations (including campsites, tented camps, hotels and lodges) in Kenya.
This data was used in Map 6.6 in Nature's Benefits in Kenya: An Atlas of Ecosystems and Human Well-Being.
Map
0.029
Collection
Kenya GIS Data
This polygon shapefile portrays the spatial distribution of wildebeest numbers observed in Kenya from 1994 to 1996. Wildlife counts came from a rangeland census using low altitude flights. Animals are aggregated to squares of 5 kilometers by 5 kilometers.
This data was used in Map 6.2 in Nature's Benefits in Kenya: An Atlas of Ecosystems and Human Well-Being.