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Map
0.144
Collection
[Topographic Map Indexes (Shapefiles)]
This polygon shapefile is an index to 1:50,000 scale maps of Japan, titled '1:50,000 chikeizu -- Gomanbun no ichi chikeizu -- 1:50,000地形圖 -- 五万分一地形圖.' This map series was originally produced by the Japanese Land Survey Department of the General Staff Headquarters in 1888. Stanford University Libraries holds a large collection of Japanese military and imperial maps, referred to as gaihōzu, or "maps of outer lands." These maps were produced starting in the early Meiji (1868-1912) era and the end of World War II by the Land Survey Department of the General Staff Headquarters, the former Japanese Army. The Library is in the process of scanning and making available all of the maps in the collection. To create this index, footprints were generated using the fishnet tool, and metadata were supplied for the digitized paper maps by Stanford University Libraries. After the footprints were created, the shapefile was trimmed and labeled according to the sources.Relief is shown by contours and spot heights with an index to adjoining sheets in margin, however, various issues exist with some of the sheets. Earlier, unnumbered sheets filed by IMW system used on recent sheets. Cultural features and vegetation shown by symbols.
This layer provides an index map that can be used to locate individual scanned map sheets.
Map
31.029
Collection
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Maps and GIS Data
This polygon shapefile contains Comprehensive Housing Affordability Strategy (CHAS) data at the county level. The CHAS is derived from the American Community Survey (ACS) data, which has a smaller sample size than the Decennial Census (which was the basis of the 2000 CHAS). As a result, the Census Bureau cannot produce data using only one year of survey responses, except in very populous areas. For areas with population 65,000 or greater, ACS estimates are available each year using only the most recent year’s survey responses (known as "1-year data"). For areas with population 20,000 or greater, ACS estimates are available each year based on averages of the previous three years of survey responses ("3-year data"). For areas with population less than 20,000—including all census tracts, and many places, counties, and minor civil divisions—the only ACS estimates available are based on averages of the previous five years of survey responses ("5-year data"). The primary purpose of the CHAS data is to demonstrate the number of households in need of housing assistance. This is estimated by the number of households that have certain housing problems and have income low enough to qualify for HUDs programs (primarily 30, 50, and 80 percent of median income). It is also important to consider the prevalence of housing problems among different types of households, such as the elderly, disabled, minorities, and different household types. The CHAS data provide counts of the numbers of households that fit these HUD-specified characteristics in HUD-specified geographic areas. In addition to estimating low-income housing needs, the CHAS data contribute to a more comprehensive market analysis by documenting issues like lead paint risks, affordability mismatch, and the interaction of affordability with variables like age of homes, number of bedrooms, and type of building. Dataset uses custom HAMFI figures calculated by HUD PDR staff based on 2008-2012 ACS income data.
This layer is intended for researchers, students, policy makers, and the general public for reference and mapping purposes, and may be used for basic applications such as viewing, querying, and map output production. This layer will provide a basemap for layers related to socio-political analysis, statistical enumeration and analysis, or to support graphical overlays and analysis with other spatial data. More advanced user applications may focus on demographics, urban and rural land use planning, socio-economic analysis and related areas (including defining boundaries, managing assets and facilities, integrating attribute databases with geographic features, spatial analysis, and presentation output.)
Map
170.946
Collection
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Maps and GIS Data
This polygon shapefile contains Comprehensive Housing Affordability Strategy (CHAS) data at the place level. The CHAS is derived from the American Community Survey (ACS) data, which has a smaller sample size than the Decennial Census (which was the basis of the 2000 CHAS). As a result, the Census Bureau cannot produce data using only one year of survey responses, except in very populous areas. For areas with population 65,000 or greater, ACS estimates are available each year using only the most recent year’s survey responses (known as "1-year data"). For areas with population 20,000 or greater, ACS estimates are available each year based on averages of the previous three years of survey responses ("3-year data"). For areas with population less than 20,000—including all census tracts, and many places, counties, and minor civil divisions—the only ACS estimates available are based on averages of the previous five years of survey responses ("5-year data"). The primary purpose of the CHAS data is to demonstrate the number of households in need of housing assistance. This is estimated by the number of households that have certain housing problems and have income low enough to qualify for HUDs programs (primarily 30, 50, and 80 percent of median income). It is also important to consider the prevalence of housing problems among different types of households, such as the elderly, disabled, minorities, and different household types. The CHAS data provide counts of the numbers of households that fit these HUD-specified characteristics in HUD-specified geographic areas. In addition to estimating low-income housing needs, the CHAS data contribute to a more comprehensive market analysis by documenting issues like lead paint risks, affordability mismatch, and the interaction of affordability with variables like age of homes, number of bedrooms, and type of building. Dataset uses custom HAMFI figures calculated by HUD PDR staff based on 2008-2012 ACS income data.
This layer is intended for researchers, students, policy makers, and the general public for reference and mapping purposes, and may be used for basic applications such as viewing, querying, and map output production. This layer will provide a basemap for layers related to socio-political analysis, statistical enumeration and analysis, or to support graphical overlays and analysis with other spatial data. More advanced user applications may focus on demographics, urban and rural land use planning, socio-economic analysis and related areas (including defining boundaries, managing assets and facilities, integrating attribute databases with geographic features, spatial analysis, and presentation output.)
Map
11.865
Collection
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Maps and GIS Data
This polygon shapefile contains Comprehensive Housing Affordability Strategy (CHAS) data at the state level. The CHAS is derived from the American Community Survey (ACS) data, which has a smaller sample size than the Decennial Census (which was the basis of the 2000 CHAS). As a result, the Census Bureau cannot produce data using only one year of survey responses, except in very populous areas. For areas with population 65,000 or greater, ACS estimates are available each year using only the most recent year’s survey responses (known as "1-year data"). For areas with population 20,000 or greater, ACS estimates are available each year based on averages of the previous three years of survey responses ("3-year data"). For areas with population less than 20,000—including all census tracts, and many places, counties, and minor civil divisions—the only ACS estimates available are based on averages of the previous five years of survey responses ("5-year data"). The primary purpose of the CHAS data is to demonstrate the number of households in need of housing assistance. This is estimated by the number of households that have certain housing problems and have income low enough to qualify for HUDs programs (primarily 30, 50, and 80 percent of median income). It is also important to consider the prevalence of housing problems among different types of households, such as the elderly, disabled, minorities, and different household types. The CHAS data provide counts of the numbers of households that fit these HUD-specified characteristics in HUD-specified geographic areas. In addition to estimating low-income housing needs, the CHAS data contribute to a more comprehensive market analysis by documenting issues like lead paint risks, affordability mismatch, and the interaction of affordability with variables like age of homes, number of bedrooms, and type of building. Dataset uses custom HAMFI figures calculated by HUD PDR staff based on 2008-2012 ACS income data.
This layer is intended for researchers, students, policy makers, and the general public for reference and mapping purposes, and may be used for basic applications such as viewing, querying, and map output production. This layer will provide a basemap for layers related to socio-political analysis, statistical enumeration and analysis, or to support graphical overlays and analysis with other spatial data. More advanced user applications may focus on demographics, urban and rural land use planning, socio-economic analysis and related areas (including defining boundaries, managing assets and facilities, integrating attribute databases with geographic features, spatial analysis, and presentation output.)
Map
215.311
Collection
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Maps and GIS Data
This polygon shapefile contains Comprehensive Housing Affordability Strategy (CHAS) data at the geographic summary level 080 (State - County - County Subdivision - Place/Remainder - Tract). The CHAS is derived from the American Community Survey (ACS) data, which has a smaller sample size than the Decennial Census (which was the basis of the 2000 CHAS). As a result, the Census Bureau cannot produce data using only one year of survey responses, except in very populous areas. For areas with population 65,000 or greater, ACS estimates are available each year using only the most recent year’s survey responses (known as "1-year data"). For areas with population 20,000 or greater, ACS estimates are available each year based on averages of the previous three years of survey responses ("3-year data"). For areas with population less than 20,000—including all census tracts, and many places, counties, and minor civil divisions—the only ACS estimates available are based on averages of the previous five years of survey responses ("5-year data"). The primary purpose of the CHAS data is to demonstrate the number of households in need of housing assistance. This is estimated by the number of households that have certain housing problems and have income low enough to qualify for HUDs programs (primarily 30, 50, and 80 percent of median income). It is also important to consider the prevalence of housing problems among different types of households, such as the elderly, disabled, minorities, and different household types. The CHAS data provide counts of the numbers of households that fit these HUD-specified characteristics in HUD-specified geographic areas. In addition to estimating low-income housing needs, the CHAS data contribute to a more comprehensive market analysis by documenting issues like lead paint risks, affordability mismatch, and the interaction of affordability with variables like age of homes, number of bedrooms, and type of building.
This layer is intended for researchers, students, policy makers, and the general public for reference and mapping purposes, and may be used for basic applications such as viewing, querying, and map output production. This layer will provide a basemap for layers related to socio-political analysis, statistical enumeration and analysis, or to support graphical overlays and analysis with other spatial data. More advanced user applications may focus on demographics, urban and rural land use planning, socio-economic analysis and related areas (including defining boundaries, managing assets and facilities, integrating attribute databases with geographic features, spatial analysis, and presentation output.)
Map
11.865
Collection
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Maps and GIS Data
This polygon shapefile contains 5-year American Community Survey (ACS) estimates of demographic variables at the state level. The TIGER/Line Files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census Bureau's Master Address File / Topologically Integrated Geographic Encoding and Referencing (MAF/TIGER) Database (MTDB). The MTDB represents a seamless national file with no overlaps or gaps between parts, however, each TIGER/Line File is designed to stand alone as an independent data set, or they can be combined to cover the entire nation. Census tracts are small, relatively permanent statistical subdivisions of a county or equivalent entity, and were defined by local participants as part of the 2010 Census Participant Statistical Areas Program. The Census Bureau delineated the census tracts in situations where no local participant existed or where all the potential participants declined to participate. The primary purpose of census tracts is to provide a stable set of geographic units for the presentation of census data and comparison back to previous decennial censuses. Census tracts generally have a population size between 1,200 and 8,000 people, with an optimum size of 4,000 people. When first delineated, census tracts were designed to be homogeneous with respect to population characteristics, economic status, and living conditions. The spatial size of census tracts varies widely depending on the density of settlement. Physical changes in street patterns caused by highway construction, new development, and so forth, may require boundary revisions. In addition, census tracts occasionally are split due to population growth, or combined as a result of substantial population decline. Census tract boundaries generally follow visible and identifiable features. They may follow legal boundaries such as minor civil division (MCD) or incorporated place boundaries in some States and situations to allow for census tract-to-governmental unit relationships where the governmental boundaries tend to remain unchanged between censuses. State and county boundaries always are census tract boundaries in the standard census geographic hierarchy. In a few rare instances, a census tract may consist of noncontiguous areas. These noncontiguous areas may occur where the census tracts are coextensive with all or parts of legal entities that are themselves noncontiguous. For the 2010 Census, the census tract code range of 9400 through 9499 was enforced for census tracts that include a majority American Indian population according to Census 2000 data and/or their area was primarily covered by federally recognized American Indian reservations and/or off-reservation trust lands; the code range 9800 through 9899 was enforced for those census tracts that contained little or no population and represented a relatively large special land use area such as a National Park, military installation, or a business/industrial park; and the code range 9900 through 9998 was enforced for those census tracts that contained only water area, no land area.The American Community Survey (ACS) 5 Year 2007-2011 demographic information is a subset of information available for download. Downloaded tables include: B01001 - Sex By Age, B03002 - Hispanic Or Latino Origin By Race, B11001 - Household Type (Including Living Alone), B11005 - Households By Presence Of People Under 18 Years By Household Type, B11006 - Households By Presence Of People 60 Years And Over By Household Type, B16005 - Nativity By Language Spoken At Home By Ability To Speak English For The Population 5 Years And Over, B25010 - Average Household Size Of Occupied Housing Units By Tenure and B15001 - Sex by Educational Attainment for the Population 18 Years and Over. Data is current as of: 2/10/2016
This layer is intended for researchers, students, policy makers, and the general public for reference and mapping purposes, and may be used for basic applications such as viewing, querying, and map output production. This layer will provide a basemap for layers related to socio-political analysis, statistical enumeration and analysis, or to support graphical overlays and analysis with other spatial data. More advanced user applications may focus on demographics, urban and rural land use planning, socio-economic analysis and related areas (including defining boundaries, managing assets and facilities, integrating attribute databases with geographic features, spatial analysis, and presentation output.)
Map
11.865
Collection
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Maps and GIS Data
5-year American Community Survey estimates of housing variables (see below) at the state level released in 2012. The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census Bureau's Master Address File / Topologically Integrated Geographic Encoding and Referencing (MAF/TIGER) Database (MTDB). The MTDB represents a seamless national file with no overlaps or gaps between parts, however, each TIGER/Line File is designed to stand alone as an independent data set, or they can be combined to cover the entire nation. States and equivalent entities are the primary governmental divisions of the United States. In addition to the fifty States, the Census Bureau treats the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and each of the Island Areas (American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, and the U.S. Virgin Islands) as the statistical equivalents of States for the purpose of data presentation.The American Community Survey (ACS) 5 Year 2008-2012 housing information is a subset of information available for download. Downloaded tables include: B25002 - Occupancy Status, B25009 - Tenure By Household Size, B25021 - Median Number Of Rooms By Tenure, B25024 - Units In Structure, B25032 - Tenure by Units In Structure, B25036 - Tenure By Year Structure Built, B25037 - Median Year Structure Built By Tenure, B25041 - Bedrooms, B25042 - Tenure By Bedrooms, B25056 - Contract Rent, B25058 - Median Contract Rent, B25068 - Bedrooms By Gross Rent, B25077 - Median Value, B25097 - Mortgage Status By Median Value (Dollars) and B25123 - Tenure By Selected Physical And Financial Conditions. Data is current as of: 2/10/2016
This layer is intended for researchers, students, policy makers, and the general public for reference and mapping purposes, and may be used for basic applications such as viewing, querying, and map output production. This layer will provide a basemap for layers related to socio-political analysis, statistical enumeration and analysis, or to support graphical overlays and analysis with other spatial data. More advanced user applications may focus on demographics, urban and rural land use planning, socio-economic analysis and related areas (including defining boundaries, managing assets and facilities, integrating attribute databases with geographic features, spatial analysis, and presentation output.)
Map
11.865
Collection
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Maps and GIS Data
5-year American Community Survey estimates of socioeconomic variables (see below) at the state level released in 2012. The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census Bureau's Master Address File / Topologically Integrated Geographic Encoding and Referencing (MAF/TIGER) Database (MTDB). The MTDB represents a seamless national file with no overlaps or gaps between parts, however, each TIGER/Line File is designed to stand alone as an independent data set, or they can be combined to cover the entire nation. States and equivalent entities are the primary governmental divisions of the United States. In addition to the fifty States, the Census Bureau treats the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and each of the Island Areas (American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, and the U.S. Virgin Islands) as the statistical equivalents of States for the purpose of data presentation.The American Community Survey (ACS) 5 Year 2008-2012 socioeconomic information is a subset of information available for download. Downloaded tables include: B08013 - Aggregate Travel Time To Work Of Workers By Sex, B08303 - Travel Time To Work, B17019 - Poverty Status In The Past 12 Months Of Families By Household Type By Tenure, B17021 - Poverty Status Of Individuals In The Past 12 Months By Living Arrangement, B19001 - Household Income In The Past 12 Months, B19013 - Median Household Income In The Past 12 Months, B19025 - Aggregate Household Income In The Past 12 Months, B19113 - Median Family Income In The Past 12 Months, B19202 - Median Nonfamily Household Income In The Past 12 Months, B23001 - Sex By Age By Employment Status For The Population 16 Years And Over, B25014 - Tenure By Occupants Per Room, B25026 - Total Population in Occupied Housing Units by Tenure by year Householder Moved into Unit, B25106 - Tenure By Housing Costs As A Percentage Of Household Income In The Past 12 Months, C24010 - Sex By Occupation For The Civilian Employed Population 16 Years And Over, B20004 - Median Earnings In the Past 12 Months (In 2009 Inflation-Adjusted Dollars) by Sex by Educational Attainment for the Population 25 Years and Over, B23006 - Educational Attainment by Employment Status for the Population 25 to 64 Years and B24021 - Occupation By Median Earnings In The Past 12 Months (In 2012 Inflation-Adjusted Dollars) For The Full-Time, Year-Round Civilian Employed Population 16 Years And Over. Data is current as of: 2/10/2016
This layer is intended for researchers, students, policy makers, and the general public for reference and mapping purposes, and may be used for basic applications such as viewing, querying, and map output production. This layer will provide a basemap for layers related to socio-political analysis, statistical enumeration and analysis, or to support graphical overlays and analysis with other spatial data. More advanced user applications may focus on demographics, urban and rural land use planning, socio-economic analysis and related areas (including defining boundaries, managing assets and facilities, integrating attribute databases with geographic features, spatial analysis, and presentation output.)
Map
10.323
Collection
[Groundwater Information Center, California: GIS Maps and Data]
This polygon shapefile contains the boundaries of 517 groundwater basins and subbasins as defined by the California Department of Water Resources as last modified by the Basin Boundary Emergency Regulation adopted on October 21, 2015. Groundwater basins are represented as polygon features and designated on the basis of geological and hydrological conditions - usually the occurrence of alluvial or unconsolidated deposits. When practical, large basins are also subdivided by political boundaries, as in the Central Valley. Basins are named and numbered per the convention of the Department of Water Resources. The associated data are considered DWR enterprise GIS data, which meet all appropriate requirements of the DWR GIS Spatial Data Standards.
Bulletin 118 defines the recognized groundwater basins and subbasins throughout the State of California. The Bulletin 118 document provides information on these basins/subbasins and the nature and extent of groundwater occurrence and management within the State. The Bulletin 118 dataset makes the geographic locations and extent of the 517 basins/subbasins publically available, for use in external mapping/GIS applications.
Map
4.857
Collection
[Groundwater Information Center, California: GIS Maps and Data]
This polygon shapefile depicts areas identified basin prioritization areas within California. At the time of the study (June 2014), Final Basin Prioritization findings indicate that 127 of California's 515 groundwater basins and subbasins are High and Medium priority. These basins account for 96% of California's annual groundwater pumping and supply 88% of the population which resides over groundwater basins. The remaining 388 basins are Low and Very Low priority and comprise 75% of the groundwater basins in the State. There are 515 alluvial groundwater basins and subbasins in California as defined in DWR's Bulletin 118. These basins contribute close to 40 percent of the California's annual water supply in an average year and as much as 45 percent in dry years. During extensive dry or drought years, groundwater can provide close to 60 percent of the water supply. Statewide, approximately 30 million people, or 80 percent of Californians, live in areas overlying alluvial groundwater basins. Some communities are 100 percent reliant on groundwater. The California Department of Water Resources (DWR) implemented the California Statewide Groundwater Elevation Monitoring (CASGEM) Program in response to legislation enacted in California's 2009 Comprehensive Water package. As part of the CASGEM Program and pursuant to the California Water Code (CWC §10933), DWR is required to prioritize California groundwater basins, so as to help identify, evaluate, and determine the need for additional groundwater level monitoring.
The CASGEM Groundwater Basin Prioritization (Basin Prioritization) is a statewide ranking of groundwater basin importance that incorporates groundwater reliance and focuses on basins producing greater than 90% of California's annual groundwater. Although the results are a statewide assessment; it is important to recognize the statewide findings are not intended to diminish the local importance of groundwater including in the smaller size or lower-use groundwater basins. This layer is intended to be used as a compliment to data, reports, and other information provided by the California Groundwater Information Center.

11. CDBG Activity, 1998-2015 [2016] Online

Map
7.731
Collection
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Maps and GIS Data
The Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) is a federal block grant distributed via formula to states and local governments. States and local governments use these grant funds to carry out housing, economic development, public services, and public improvement activities that serve low- and moderate-income people. The locations of CDBG activities are derived from addresses provided by HUD grantees from 1996 to present in HUDs Integrated Disbursement and Information System (IDIS). Until recently, these addresses were not validated on point of entry. The prevalence of missing or incorrect address data means that HUD cannot guarantee the accuracy of these locations. However, due to recent improvements to IDIS, HUD expects the quality of activity locations to improve over time. Data Current As Of: 9/25/2016
This layer is intended for researchers, students, policy makers, and the general public for reference and mapping purposes, and may be used for basic applications such as viewing, querying, and map output production. This layer will provide a basemap for layers related to socio-political analysis, statistical enumeration and analysis, or to support graphical overlays and analysis with other spatial data. More advanced user applications may focus on demographics, urban and rural land use planning, socio-economic analysis and related areas (including defining boundaries, managing assets and facilities, integrating attribute databases with geographic features, spatial analysis, and presentation output.)
Map
610.28
Collection
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Maps and GIS Data
The Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) is a federal block grant distributed via formula to states and local governments. States and local governments use these grant funds to carry out housing, economic development, public services, and public improvement activities that serve low- and moderate-income people. The locations of CDBG activities are derived from addresses provided by HUD grantees from 1996 to present in HUDs Integrated Disbursement and Information System (IDIS). Until recently, these addresses were not validated on point of entry. The prevalence of missing or incorrect address data means that HUD cannot guarantee the accuracy of these locations. However, due to recent improvements to IDIS, HUD expects the quality of activity locations to improve over time. All CDBG activities in the categories of acquisition, economic development, housing, public improvements, public services, and other summarized by Census tract. All tracts are included, except for those that have a Total Activity Count = 0 or the Total Activity Count is NULL. Data Current As Of: 05/11/2016
This layer is intended for researchers, students, policy makers, and the general public for reference and mapping purposes, and may be used for basic applications such as viewing, querying, and map output production. This layer will provide a basemap for layers related to socio-political analysis, statistical enumeration and analysis, or to support graphical overlays and analysis with other spatial data. More advanced user applications may focus on demographics, urban and rural land use planning, socio-economic analysis and related areas (including defining boundaries, managing assets and facilities, integrating attribute databases with geographic features, spatial analysis, and presentation output.)

13. CDBG Grantee Areas, 2016 [2016] Online

Map
30.654
Collection
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Maps and GIS Data
This polygon shapefile represents the boundaries of Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Entitlement Communities and State Administered CDBG grantees. The CDBG program is a flexible program that provides communities with resources to address a wide range of unique community development needs. Beginning in 1974, the CDBG program is one of the longest continuously run programs at HUD. The CDBG program provides annual grants on a formula basis to of local and state governments. The annual CDBG appropriation is allocated between States and local jurisdictions called "non-entitlement" and "entitlement" communities respectively. Entitlement communities are comprised of the principal cities of Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs); metropolitan cities with populations of at least 50,000; and qualified urban counties with a population of 200,000 or more (excluding the populations of entitlement cities). States distribute CDBG funds to non-entitlement localities not qualified as entitlement communities. HUD determines the amount of each grant by using a formula comprised of several measures of community need, including the extent of poverty, population, housing overcrowding, age of housing, and population growth lag in relationship to other metropolitan areas. Original Release The HOME Investment Partnership Program (HOME) is authorized under Title II of the Cranston-Gonzalez National Affordable Housing Act. HOME provides formula grants to States and localities that communities use often in partnership with local nonprofit groups to fund a wide range of activities that build, buy, and/or rehabilitate affordable housing for rent or homeownership or provide direct rental assistance to low-income people.
This layer is intended for researchers, students, policy makers, and the general public for reference and mapping purposes, and may be used for basic applications such as viewing, querying, and map output production. This layer will provide a basemap for layers related to socio-political analysis, statistical enumeration and analysis, or to support graphical overlays and analysis with other spatial data. More advanced user applications may focus on demographics, urban and rural land use planning, socio-economic analysis and related areas (including defining boundaries, managing assets and facilities, integrating attribute databases with geographic features, spatial analysis, and presentation output.)

14. Choice Grantees, 2016 [2016] Online

Map
0.062
Collection
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Maps and GIS Data
This polygon shapefile represents the boundaries of Choice grantee recipients as of April 2016. The Seattle Housing Authority was awarded two implementation grants for the Yesler Terrace development. The applicant submitted slightly differing shapes during the 2010-2011 and 2012 application process. This layer shows the shape of the target area as submitted by the applicant for the 2012 round of funding. Choice Neighborhoods grants build upon the successes of public housing transformation under HOPE VI to provide support for the preservation and rehabilitation of public and HUD-assisted housing, within the context of a broader approach to concentrated poverty. In addition to public housing authorities, the initiative will involve local governments, non-profits, and for-profit developers in undertaking comprehensive local planning with residents and the community.
This layer is intended for researchers, students, policy makers, and the general public for reference and mapping purposes, and may be used for basic applications such as viewing, querying, and map output production. This layer will provide a basemap for layers related to socio-political analysis, statistical enumeration and analysis, or to support graphical overlays and analysis with other spatial data. More advanced user applications may focus on demographics, urban and rural land use planning, socio-economic analysis and related areas (including defining boundaries, managing assets and facilities, integrating attribute databases with geographic features, spatial analysis, and presentation output.)
Map
0.045
Collection
[Topographic Map Indexes (Shapefiles)]
This polygon shapefile is an index to 1:50,000 scale maps of Korea, titled 'Chosen 1:50,000 Chikeizu/朝鮮五萬分之一地形圖: 1:50,000 Topo of Korea. This map series was originally produced by the Japanese Land Survey Department of the General Staff Headquarters between 1915 and 1917. Stanford University Libraries holds a large collection of Japanese military and imperial maps, referred to as gaihōzu, or "maps of outer lands." These maps were produced starting in the early Meiji (1868-1912) era and the end of World War II by the Land Survey Department of the General Staff Headquarters, the former Japanese Army. The Library is in the process of scanning and making available all of the maps in the collection. To create this index, footprints were generated using the fishnet tool, and metadata were supplied for the digitized paper maps by Stanford University Libraries. After the footprints were created, the shapefile was trimmed and labeled according to the sources.
This layer provides an index map that can be used to locate individual scanned map sheets.
Map
0.019
Collection
[Topographic Map Indexes (Shapefiles)]
This polygon shapefile is an index to 1:50,000 scale maps of Korea, titled 'Chosen 1:50,000 Chikeizu/Chosen 1:50,000 Chikeizu.’ This map series was originally produced by the Japanese Land Survey Department of the General Staff Headquarters between 1914and 1918. Stanford University Libraries holds a large collection of Japanese military and imperial maps, referred to as gaihōzu, or "maps of outer lands." These maps were produced starting in the early Meiji (1868-1912) era and the end of World War II by the Land Survey Department of the General Staff Headquarters, the former Japanese Army. The Library is in the process of scanning and making available all of the maps in the collection. To create this index, footprints were generated using the fishnet tool, and metadata were supplied for the digitized paper maps by Stanford University Libraries. After the footprints were created, the shapefile was trimmed and labeled according to the sources.
This layer provides an index map that can be used to locate individual scanned map sheets.
Map
0.05
Collection
[Topographic Map Indexes (Shapefiles)]
This polygon shapefile is an index to 1:50,000 scale maps of North Korea, titled 'Chosen 1:50,000 Chikeizu/朝鮮五萬分之一地形圖: 1:50,000 Topo of Korea.'. This map series was originally produced by the Japanese Land Survey Department of the General Staff Headquarters between 1910 and 1917. Stanford University Libraries holds a large collection of Japanese military and imperial maps, referred to as gaihōzu, or "maps of outer lands." These maps were produced starting in the early Meiji (1868-1912) era and the end of World War II by the Land Survey Department of the General Staff Headquarters, the former Japanese Army. The Library is in the process of scanning and making available all of the maps in the collection. To create this index, footprints were generated using the fishnet tool, and metadata were supplied for the digitized paper maps by Stanford University Libraries. After the footprints were created, the shapefile was trimmed and labeled according to the sources.
This layer provides an index map that can be used to locate individual scanned map sheets.
Map
0.062
Collection
[Topographic Map Indexes (Shapefiles)]
This polygon shapefile is an index to 1:50,000 scale maps of North Korea, titled 'Chosen 1:50,000 Chikeizu.' This map series was originally produced by the Japanese Land Survey Department of the General Staff Headquarters between 1916 and 1918. Stanford University Libraries holds a large collection of Japanese military and imperial maps, referred to as gaihōzu, or "maps of outer lands." These maps were produced starting in the early Meiji (1868-1912) era and the end of World War II by the Land Survey Department of the General Staff Headquarters, the former Japanese Army. The Library is in the process of scanning and making available all of the maps in the collection. To create this index, footprints were generated using the fishnet tool, and metadata were supplied for the digitized paper maps by Stanford University Libraries. After the footprints were created, the shapefile was trimmed and labeled according to the sources.
This layer provides an index map that can be used to locate individual scanned map sheets.
Map
0.009
Collection
[Topographic Map Indexes (Shapefiles)]
This polygon shapefile is an index to 1:200,000 scale maps of Korea, titled 'Chōsen nijūmanbun no ichi zu, 朝鮮二十萬分一圖.' This map series was originally produced by the Japanese Land Survey Department of the General Staff Headquarters in 1921. Stanford University Libraries holds a large collection of Japanese military and imperial maps, referred to as gaihōzu, or "maps of outer lands." These maps were produced starting in the early Meiji (1868-1912) era and the end of World War II by the Land Survey Department of the General Staff Headquarters, the former Japanese Army. The Library is in the process of scanning and making available all of the maps in the collection. To create this index, footprints were generated using the fishnet tool, and metadata were supplied for the digitized paper maps by Stanford University Libraries. After the footprints were created, the shapefile was trimmed and labeled according to the sources.
This layer provides an index map that can be used to locate individual scanned map sheets.

20. Dabao Kinbōzu, Maps Index [2016] Online

Map
0.001
Collection
[Topographic Map Indexes (Shapefiles)]
This polygon shapefile is an index to 1:50000 scale maps of Davao (Philippines), titled 'Dabao Kinbōzu -- ダバオ近傍圖/Dabao Kinbōzu.’ This map series was originally produced by the Japanese Land Survey Department of the General Staff Headquarters in 1944. Stanford University Libraries holds a large collection of Japanese military and imperial maps, referred to as gaihōzu, or "maps of outer lands." These maps were produced starting in the early Meiji (1868-1912) era and the end of World War II by the Land Survey Department of the General Staff Headquarters, the former Japanese Army. The Library is in the process of scanning and making available all of the maps in the collection. To create this index, footprints were generated using the fishnet tool, and metadata were supplied for the digitized paper maps by Stanford University Libraries. After the footprints were created, the shapefile was trimmed and labeled according to the sources.
This layer provides an index map that can be used to locate individual scanned map sheets.