GV865 .R6 A3 2013 - GV865 .R65 K46 2014
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Book
xxx, 156 p. ; 24 cm.
An anthology of Jackie Robinson's columns in the New York Post and the New York Amsterdam News newspapers.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Book
xxii, 264 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
This anthology discusses Jackie Robinson's early years, his life and baseball glory as a Brooklyn Dodger, his relationship with the fans, and his peers and successors. The contributors to this work include, Paul Robeson Jr, Carl Erskine, Roger Rosenblatt, Jules Tygiel and Lester Rodney.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Book
xviii, 359 p., [8] p. of plates : ill. ; 25 cm.
  • Faith in democracy : 1946-1956
  • From faith to frustration : 1957
  • Against patience : 1958
  • Profiles in question : 1959
  • Selling Nixon : 1960
  • Wrong about Kennedy? : 1961
  • From the Hall of Fame to hallowed ashes : 1962
  • Back our brothers, except Adam and Malcolm : 1963
  • The campaign against bigotry : 1964
  • A Rockefeller Republican : 1965-1966
  • Sharp attacks, surprising defenses : 1967
  • The politics of Black Pride : 1968
  • Moving forward in our struggle : 1969-1972.
Never-before-published letters offer a rich portrait of the baseball star as a fearless advocate for racial justice at the highest levels of American politics Jackie Robinson's courage on the baseball diamond is one of the great stories of the struggle for civil rights in America, and his Hall of Fame career speaks for itself. But we no longer hear Robinson speak for himself; his death at age fifty-three in 1972 robbed America of his voice far too soon. In "First Class Citizenship, " Jackie Robinson comes alive on the page for the first time in decades. The scholar Michael G. Long has unearthed a remarkable trove of Robinson's correspondence with--and personal replies from--such towering figures as Dwight Eisenhower, Richard Nixon, John F. Kennedy, Lyndon Johnson, Martin Luther King, Malcolm X, Hubert Humphrey, Nelson Rockefeller, and Barry Goldwater. These extraordinary conversations reveal the scope and depth of Robinson's effort during the 1950s and 1960s to rid America of racism. Writing eloquently and with evident passion, Robinson charted his own course, offering his support to Democrats and to Republicans, questioning the tactics of the civil rights movement, and challenging the nation's leaders when he felt they were guilty of hypocrisy--or worse. Through his words as well as his actions, Jackie Robinson truly personified the "first class citizenship" that he considered the birthright of all Americans, whatever their race.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Book
260 p., [32] p. of plates : ill., ports. ; 24 cm.
Green Library
Book
48 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
Traces the life of the talented and determined athlete who broke the color barrier in major league baseball in 1947 by joining the Brooklyn Dodgers.
Green Library
Book
22 p.
Souvenir program for special evening at NY Mets' Shea Stadium celebrating the 50th anniversary of Jackie Robinson's breaking the color barrier in American major league baseball. Includes articles on Robinson's career and impact, congratulatory letters from Bill Clinton, Bud Selig, and the NY Mets management . 6x8.5 inches, wraps, color illus. throughout, stapled. [Descriptive information provided by dealer]
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
x, 234 pages : illustrations, map ; 24 cm
  • Brooklyn's bums
  • Rickey's choice
  • Jackie and Campy
  • Breaking the color line
  • Teammates
  • Striking back
  • Collision course
  • Breakup.
As star players for the 1955 World Champion Brooklyn Dodgers, and prior to that as the first black players to be candidates to break professional baseball's colour barrier, Jackie Robinson and Roy Campanella would seem to be natural allies. But the two men were divided by a rivalry going far beyond the personality differences and petty jealousies of competitive teammates. Behind the bitterness were deep and differing beliefs about the fight for civil rights. Robinson, the more aggressive and intense of the two, thought Jim Crow should be attacked head-on; Campanella, more passive and easygoing, believed that ability, not militancy, was the key to racial equality. Drawing on interviews with former players such as Monte Irvin, Hank Aaron, Carl Erskine and Don Zimmer, Jackie and Campy offers a closer look at these two players and their place in a historical movement torn between active defiance and passive resistance. William C. Kashatus deepens our understanding of these two baseball icons and civil rights pioneers and provides a clearer picture of their time and our own.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Book
224 p. : ports. ; 20 cm.
Green Library
Book
x, 512 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
Green Library
Book
240 p. : ill. ; 29 cm.
Green Library
Book
240 p. : ill. ; 29 cm
In the spring of 1947, Jackie Robinson played his first game with the Brooklyn Dodgers, breaking down baseball's decades-old colour line and changing the face of the game forever. Now, in this intimate portrait, Robinson's widow, Rachel, tells her husband's story--and that of her life with him--from her unique perspective matched with 301 black-and-white photographs. Along with a new cover, the book will be re-released at a perfect time given the public's renewed interest in Robinson after the release of 42, a biographical movie about the player. All will be moved by the story of a remarkable man seen through the eyes of an equally remarkable woman.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Book
236, [8] p. of plates : ill. ; 24 cm.
Book
339 p. illus. 24 cm.
www.aspresolver.com Black Thought and Culture
Book
339 p. illus. 24 cm.
Special Collections
Book
110 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
Traces the life of the athelete who broke the color barrier in major league baseball when he joined the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1947.
Green Library
Book
vii, 168 pages ; 21 cm.
  • Hero
  • Steaming home
  • Brooklyn, 1947
  • Barred in Boston
  • Mr. Rickey's little list
  • "Oh, What a pair, those two!"
  • Minor leaguer
  • The season
  • Epilogue
  • Acknowledgments, notes, and thanks.
The NPR Weekend Edition broadcaster recounts the 1947 integration of major league baseball, capturing the drama of Jackie Robinson's first year in baseball.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xii, 392 p., [12] p. of plates : ill. ; 24 cm.
Green Library, SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xii, 392 p., [12] p. of plates : ill. ; 24 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-588-01
Book
xii, 413 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
Green Library
Book
xii, 415 pages, 12 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 21 cm
  • Early innings. The crucible of white hot competition ; Twilight ere the noon ; The conspiracy of silence ; Oh, they were are pair! ; It won't work out!
  • Runs, hits, and errors. If they come here, they can't play ; Il a gagné ses épaulettes ; They don't want me? ; The most costly trial ever given a player ; A lone Negro in the game
  • Extra innings. Remember, all out boys can't be a Robinson ; A Paul Bunyan in Technicolor ; The only thing I wanted to do was hit the major leagues ; The unwritten law of the South ; With all deliberate speed ; They've just got to forget they're Black ; Baseball has done it.
In this gripping account of one of the most important steps in the history of American desegregation, Jules Tygiel tells the story of Jackie Robinson's crossing of baseball's color line. Examining the social and historical context of Robinson's introduction into white organized baseball, both on and off the field, Tygiel also tells the often neglected stories of other African-American players-such as Satchel Paige, Roy Campanella, Willie Mays, and Hank Aaron-who helped transform our national pastime into an integrated game. Drawing on dozens of interviews with players and front office executives, contemporary newspaper accounts, and personal papers, Tygiel provides the most telling and insightful account of Jackie Robinson's influence on American baseball and society. The anniversary issue features a new foreword by the author.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Book
xii, 164 pages : illustrations ; 21 cm.
Green Library
Book
341 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)