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Book
online resource (xxi, 417 pages) : illustrations
  • Part I. Introducing the Domain and Levels of Service
  • 1. Character of domain and organization of book
  • 2. Economy 1: immanent mismatch between demand and supply of health care workforce
  • 3. Level 0: searching-finding-trusting-acting-risking one's life?
  • 4. Level 1: enhancing the provider- client relation through IT
  • 5. Level 2: services without in-person contact between provider and client
  • 6. Level 3: patient power on the web: the multifaceted role of personal health wisdom
  • 7. Distinctive features of services conveyed through mobile apps
  • Part II. Building Safety Nets Around the Active Client
  • 8. Dimensions of patient risks and requirements for patient safety
  • 9. Services for all stages of the metabolic syndrome and its consequences
  • 10. Basic services reach out towards under-served populations
  • 11. Smart homes: empowering the patient till the end
  • 12. Partial solutions for patient safety
  • Part III. Additional Methodology
  • 13. Privacy and data protection: mission impossible?
  • 14. The patient-centered electronic health record and patient portals
  • 15. Scrutinized proof of effectiveness or cost effectiveness regarding patient reported outcomes
  • 16. Economy 2: economic subsistence of services when research funding ends
  • 17. Towards future consumer health informatics adapted health care legislation
  • Trademarks
  • Nomenclature
  • General index
  • Index of services.
  • Part I. Introducing the Domain and Levels of Service
  • 1. Character of domain and organization of book
  • 2. Economy 1: immanent mismatch between demand and supply of health care workforce
  • 3. Level 0: searching-finding-trusting-acting-risking one's life?
  • 4. Level 1: enhancing the provider- client relation through IT
  • 5. Level 2: services without in-person contact between provider and client
  • 6. Level 3: patient power on the web: the multifaceted role of personal health wisdom
  • 7. Distinctive features of services conveyed through mobile apps
  • Part II. Building Safety Nets Around the Active Client
  • 8. Dimensions of patient risks and requirements for patient safety
  • 9. Services for all stages of the metabolic syndrome and its consequences
  • 10. Basic services reach out towards under-served populations
  • 11. Smart homes: empowering the patient till the end
  • 12. Partial solutions for patient safety
  • Part III. Additional Methodology
  • 13. Privacy and data protection: mission impossible?
  • 14. The patient-centered electronic health record and patient portals
  • 15. Scrutinized proof of effectiveness or cost effectiveness regarding patient reported outcomes
  • 16. Economy 2: economic subsistence of services when research funding ends
  • 17. Towards future consumer health informatics adapted health care legislation
  • Trademarks
  • Nomenclature
  • General index
  • Index of services.
Medical Library (Lane)
Status of items at Medical Library (Lane)
Medical Library (Lane) Status
Check Lane Library catalog for status
SPRINGER Unknown
Book
online resource (xi, 257 pages) : illustrations (some color)
  • Method for assaying the lipid kinase phosphatidylinositol-5-phosphate 4-kinase α in quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) bioluminescent format / Mindy I. Davis, Atsuo T. Sasaki, and Anton Simeonov
  • Assaying ceramide synthase activity in vitro and in living cells using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry / Xin Ying Lim, Russell Pickford, and Anthony S. Don
  • Fluorescent assays for ceramide synthase activity / Timothy A. Couttas and Anthony S. Don
  • Identification of the interactome of a palmitoylated membrane protein, phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase type II alpha / Avanti Gokhale ... [et al.]
  • Measurement of long-chain fatty Acyl-CoA synthetase activity / Joachim Füllekrug and Margarete Poppelreuther
  • Qualitative and quantitative in vitro analysis of phosphatidylinositol phosphatase substrate specificity / Laura Ren Huey Ip and Christina Anja Gewinner
  • Luciferase reporter assays to assess liver X receptor transcriptional activity / Matthew C. Gage, Benoit Pourcet, and Inés Pineda-Torra
  • Metabolically biotinylated reporters for electron microscopic imaging of cytoplasmic membrane microdomains / Kimberly J. Krager and John G. Koland
  • Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analysis of the diffusional mobility of plasma membrane proteins : HER3 mobility in breast cancer cell membranes / Mitul Sarkar and John G. Koland
  • Isolation and analysis of detergent-resistant membrane fractions / Massimo Aureli ... [et al.]
  • Detection of isolated mitochondria-associated ER membranes using the sigma-1 receptor / Abasha Lewis, Shang-Yi Tsai, and Tsung-Ping Su
  • Using surface plasmon resonance to quantitatively assess lipid-protein interactions / Kathryn Del Vecchio and Robert V. Stahelin
  • Analyzing protein-phosphoinositide interactions with liposome flotation assays / Ricarda A. Busse ... [et al.]
  • High-throughput fluorometric assay for membrane-protein interaction / Wonhwa Cho, Hyunjin Kim, and Yusi Hu
  • Guidelines for the use of protein domains in acidic phospholipid imaging / Matthieu Pierre Platre and Yvon Jaillais
  • Analysis of sphingolipid synthesis and transport by metabolic labeling of cultured cells with [3H]serine / Neale D. Ridgway
  • Determination and characterization of tetraspanin-associated phosphoinositide-4 kinases in primary and neoplastic liver cells / Krista Rombouts and Vinicio Carloni
  • Analysis of the phosphoinositide composition of subcellular membrane fractions / Deborah A. Sarkes and Lucia E. Rameh
  • Single-molecule imaging of signal transduction via GPI- anchored receptors / Kenichi G. N. Suzuki
  • Measuring phosphatidylinositol generation on biological membranes / Mark Waugh
  • Assay for CDP-diacylglycerol generation by CDS in membrane fractions / Mark Waugh.
  • Method for assaying the lipid kinase phosphatidylinositol-5-phosphate 4-kinase α in quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) bioluminescent format / Mindy I. Davis, Atsuo T. Sasaki, and Anton Simeonov
  • Assaying ceramide synthase activity in vitro and in living cells using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry / Xin Ying Lim, Russell Pickford, and Anthony S. Don
  • Fluorescent assays for ceramide synthase activity / Timothy A. Couttas and Anthony S. Don
  • Identification of the interactome of a palmitoylated membrane protein, phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase type II alpha / Avanti Gokhale ... [et al.]
  • Measurement of long-chain fatty Acyl-CoA synthetase activity / Joachim Füllekrug and Margarete Poppelreuther
  • Qualitative and quantitative in vitro analysis of phosphatidylinositol phosphatase substrate specificity / Laura Ren Huey Ip and Christina Anja Gewinner
  • Luciferase reporter assays to assess liver X receptor transcriptional activity / Matthew C. Gage, Benoit Pourcet, and Inés Pineda-Torra
  • Metabolically biotinylated reporters for electron microscopic imaging of cytoplasmic membrane microdomains / Kimberly J. Krager and John G. Koland
  • Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analysis of the diffusional mobility of plasma membrane proteins : HER3 mobility in breast cancer cell membranes / Mitul Sarkar and John G. Koland
  • Isolation and analysis of detergent-resistant membrane fractions / Massimo Aureli ... [et al.]
  • Detection of isolated mitochondria-associated ER membranes using the sigma-1 receptor / Abasha Lewis, Shang-Yi Tsai, and Tsung-Ping Su
  • Using surface plasmon resonance to quantitatively assess lipid-protein interactions / Kathryn Del Vecchio and Robert V. Stahelin
  • Analyzing protein-phosphoinositide interactions with liposome flotation assays / Ricarda A. Busse ... [et al.]
  • High-throughput fluorometric assay for membrane-protein interaction / Wonhwa Cho, Hyunjin Kim, and Yusi Hu
  • Guidelines for the use of protein domains in acidic phospholipid imaging / Matthieu Pierre Platre and Yvon Jaillais
  • Analysis of sphingolipid synthesis and transport by metabolic labeling of cultured cells with [3H]serine / Neale D. Ridgway
  • Determination and characterization of tetraspanin-associated phosphoinositide-4 kinases in primary and neoplastic liver cells / Krista Rombouts and Vinicio Carloni
  • Analysis of the phosphoinositide composition of subcellular membrane fractions / Deborah A. Sarkes and Lucia E. Rameh
  • Single-molecule imaging of signal transduction via GPI- anchored receptors / Kenichi G. N. Suzuki
  • Measuring phosphatidylinositol generation on biological membranes / Mark Waugh
  • Assay for CDP-diacylglycerol generation by CDS in membrane fractions / Mark Waugh.
Medical Library (Lane)
Status of items at Medical Library (Lane)
Medical Library (Lane) Status
Check Lane Library catalog for status
SPRINGER PROTOCOLS Unknown
Book
online resource (xi, 365 pages) : illustrations (some color)
  • Using GenBank / Eric W. Sayers and Ilene Karsch-Mizrachi
  • UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot, the manually annotated section of the UniProt knowledgebase : how to use the entry view / Emmanuel Boutet ... [et al.]
  • KEGG bioinformatics resource for plant genomics and metabolomics / Minoru Kanehisa
  • Plant pathway databases / Pankaj Jaiswal and Björn Usadel
  • Plant ontology : a tool for plant genomics / Laurel Cooper and Pankaj Jaiswal
  • Ensembl plants : integrating tools for visualizing, mining, and analyzing plant genomics data / Dan Bolser ... [et al.]
  • Gramene : a resource for comparative analysis of plants genomes and pathways / Marcela Karey Tello-Ruiz ... [et al.]
  • PGSB/MIPS plant genome information resources and concepts for the analysis of complex grass genomes / Manuel Spannagl ... [et al.]
  • MaizeGDB : the maize genetics and genomics database / Lisa Harper ... [et al.]
  • WheatGenome.info : a resource for wheat genomics resource / Kaitao Lai
  • User guidelines for the brassica database : BRAD / Xiaobo Wang, Feng Cheng, and Xiaowu Wang
  • TAG sequence identification of genomic regions using TAGdb / Pradeep Ruperao
  • Short read alignment using SOAP2 / Bhavna Hurgobin
  • Tablet : visualizing next-generation sequence assemblies and mappings / Iain Milne ... [et al.]
  • Analysis of genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) data / Sateesh Kagale ... [et al.]
  • Skim-based genotyping by sequencing using a double haploid population to call SNPs, infer gene conversions, and improve genome assemblies / Philipp Emanuel Bayer
  • Finding and characterizing repeats in plant genomes / Jacques Nicolas, Pierre Peterlongo, and Sébastien Tempel
  • Analysis of RNA-Seq data using TopHat and cufflinks / Sreya Ghosh and Chon-Kit Kenneth Chan.
  • Using GenBank / Eric W. Sayers and Ilene Karsch-Mizrachi
  • UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot, the manually annotated section of the UniProt knowledgebase : how to use the entry view / Emmanuel Boutet ... [et al.]
  • KEGG bioinformatics resource for plant genomics and metabolomics / Minoru Kanehisa
  • Plant pathway databases / Pankaj Jaiswal and Björn Usadel
  • Plant ontology : a tool for plant genomics / Laurel Cooper and Pankaj Jaiswal
  • Ensembl plants : integrating tools for visualizing, mining, and analyzing plant genomics data / Dan Bolser ... [et al.]
  • Gramene : a resource for comparative analysis of plants genomes and pathways / Marcela Karey Tello-Ruiz ... [et al.]
  • PGSB/MIPS plant genome information resources and concepts for the analysis of complex grass genomes / Manuel Spannagl ... [et al.]
  • MaizeGDB : the maize genetics and genomics database / Lisa Harper ... [et al.]
  • WheatGenome.info : a resource for wheat genomics resource / Kaitao Lai
  • User guidelines for the brassica database : BRAD / Xiaobo Wang, Feng Cheng, and Xiaowu Wang
  • TAG sequence identification of genomic regions using TAGdb / Pradeep Ruperao
  • Short read alignment using SOAP2 / Bhavna Hurgobin
  • Tablet : visualizing next-generation sequence assemblies and mappings / Iain Milne ... [et al.]
  • Analysis of genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) data / Sateesh Kagale ... [et al.]
  • Skim-based genotyping by sequencing using a double haploid population to call SNPs, infer gene conversions, and improve genome assemblies / Philipp Emanuel Bayer
  • Finding and characterizing repeats in plant genomes / Jacques Nicolas, Pierre Peterlongo, and Sébastien Tempel
  • Analysis of RNA-Seq data using TopHat and cufflinks / Sreya Ghosh and Chon-Kit Kenneth Chan.
Medical Library (Lane)
Status of items at Medical Library (Lane)
Medical Library (Lane) Status
Check Lane Library catalog for status
SPRINGER PROTOCOLS Unknown
Book
online resource (xi, 395 pages) : illustrations (some color)
  • Time-lapse fluorescence microscopy of budding yeast cells / Arun Kumar and Manuel Mendoza
  • Real-time visualization and quantification of contractile ring proteins in single living cells / Reshma Davidson ... [et al.]
  • Fluorescence recovery after photo-bleaching (FRAP) and fluorescence loss in photo-bleaching (FLIP) experiments to study protein dynamics during budding yeast cell division / Alessio Bolognesi ... [et al.]
  • High-speed super-resolution imaging of live fission yeast cells / Caroline Laplante ... [et al.]
  • Monitoring chitin deposition during septum assembly in budding yeast / Irene Arcones and Cesar Roncero
  • Imaging septum formation by fluorescence microscopy / Juan Carlos Ribas and Juan Carlos G. Cortés
  • Visualization of cytokinesis events in budding yeast by transmission electron microscopy / Franz Meitinger and Gislene Pereira
  • Visualization of fission yeast cells by transmission electron microscopy / Matthias Sipiczki
  • Characterization of septin ultrastructure in budding yeast using electron tomography / Aurélie Bertin and Eva Nogales
  • Isolation of cytokinetic actomyosin rings from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe / Junqi Huang ... [et al.]
  • Measurements of myosin-II motor activity during cytokinesis in fission yeast / Qing Tang, Luther W. Pollard, and Matthew Lord
  • In vitro biochemical characterization of cytokinesis actin-binding proteins / Dennis Zimmermann ... [et al.]
  • Characterization of cytokinetic F-BARs and other membrane-binding proteins / Nathan A. McDonald and Kathleen L. Gould
  • Analysis of three-dimensional structures of exocyst components / Johannes Lesigang and Gang Dong
  • Analysis of Rho-GTPase activity during budding yeast cytokinesis / Masayuki Onishi and John R. Pringle
  • Detection of phosphorylation status of cytokinetic components / Franz Meitinger, Saravanan Palani, and Gislene Pereira
  • Studying protein-protein interactions in budding yeast using co-immunoprecipitation / Magdalena Foltman and Alberto Sanchez-Diaz
  • Conditional budding yeast mutants with temperature-sensitive and auxin-inducible degrons for screening of suppressor genes / Asli Devrekanli and Masato T. Kanemaki
  • Synchronization of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae / Magdalena Foltman, Iago Molist, and Alberto Sanchez-Diaz
  • Fission yeast cell cycle synchronization methods / Marta Tormos-Pérez, Livia Pérez-Hidalgo, and Sergio Moreno
  • Review of fluorescent proteins for use in yeast / Maja Bialecka-Fornal, Tatyana Makushok, and Susanne M. Rafelski
  • Visualization and image analysis of yeast cells / Steve Bagley
  • Toolbox for protein structure prediction / Daniel Barry Roche and Liam James McGuffin
  • From structure to function : a comprehensive compendium of tools to unveil protein domains and understand their role in cytokinesis / Sergio A. Rincon and Anne Paoletti.
  • Time-lapse fluorescence microscopy of budding yeast cells / Arun Kumar and Manuel Mendoza
  • Real-time visualization and quantification of contractile ring proteins in single living cells / Reshma Davidson ... [et al.]
  • Fluorescence recovery after photo-bleaching (FRAP) and fluorescence loss in photo-bleaching (FLIP) experiments to study protein dynamics during budding yeast cell division / Alessio Bolognesi ... [et al.]
  • High-speed super-resolution imaging of live fission yeast cells / Caroline Laplante ... [et al.]
  • Monitoring chitin deposition during septum assembly in budding yeast / Irene Arcones and Cesar Roncero
  • Imaging septum formation by fluorescence microscopy / Juan Carlos Ribas and Juan Carlos G. Cortés
  • Visualization of cytokinesis events in budding yeast by transmission electron microscopy / Franz Meitinger and Gislene Pereira
  • Visualization of fission yeast cells by transmission electron microscopy / Matthias Sipiczki
  • Characterization of septin ultrastructure in budding yeast using electron tomography / Aurélie Bertin and Eva Nogales
  • Isolation of cytokinetic actomyosin rings from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe / Junqi Huang ... [et al.]
  • Measurements of myosin-II motor activity during cytokinesis in fission yeast / Qing Tang, Luther W. Pollard, and Matthew Lord
  • In vitro biochemical characterization of cytokinesis actin-binding proteins / Dennis Zimmermann ... [et al.]
  • Characterization of cytokinetic F-BARs and other membrane-binding proteins / Nathan A. McDonald and Kathleen L. Gould
  • Analysis of three-dimensional structures of exocyst components / Johannes Lesigang and Gang Dong
  • Analysis of Rho-GTPase activity during budding yeast cytokinesis / Masayuki Onishi and John R. Pringle
  • Detection of phosphorylation status of cytokinetic components / Franz Meitinger, Saravanan Palani, and Gislene Pereira
  • Studying protein-protein interactions in budding yeast using co-immunoprecipitation / Magdalena Foltman and Alberto Sanchez-Diaz
  • Conditional budding yeast mutants with temperature-sensitive and auxin-inducible degrons for screening of suppressor genes / Asli Devrekanli and Masato T. Kanemaki
  • Synchronization of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae / Magdalena Foltman, Iago Molist, and Alberto Sanchez-Diaz
  • Fission yeast cell cycle synchronization methods / Marta Tormos-Pérez, Livia Pérez-Hidalgo, and Sergio Moreno
  • Review of fluorescent proteins for use in yeast / Maja Bialecka-Fornal, Tatyana Makushok, and Susanne M. Rafelski
  • Visualization and image analysis of yeast cells / Steve Bagley
  • Toolbox for protein structure prediction / Daniel Barry Roche and Liam James McGuffin
  • From structure to function : a comprehensive compendium of tools to unveil protein domains and understand their role in cytokinesis / Sergio A. Rincon and Anne Paoletti.
Medical Library (Lane)
Status of items at Medical Library (Lane)
Medical Library (Lane) Status
Check Lane Library catalog for status
SPRINGER PROTOCOLS Unknown
Book
1 online resource (4 p. ) : digital, PDF file.
Abstract Not Provided
Abstract Not Provided
Video
1 online resource (streaming video file)
Animals must have food and the ability to reproduce in order to survive. These processes occur in the environment in which they have evolved and to which they have adapted. The process of adaptation takes millions of years and those species that are successful have developed both physical and behavioral tools that allow them to survive harmoniously with their environment and its inhabitants. In this program we observe a variety of land animals and the survival tools they have developed, such as camouflage, communication skills, associations, shells and armors, attack and timely flight.
Animals must have food and the ability to reproduce in order to survive. These processes occur in the environment in which they have evolved and to which they have adapted. The process of adaptation takes millions of years and those species that are successful have developed both physical and behavioral tools that allow them to survive harmoniously with their environment and its inhabitants. In this program we observe a variety of land animals and the survival tools they have developed, such as camouflage, communication skills, associations, shells and armors, attack and timely flight.
Video
1 online resource (streaming video file)
Sea animals, like land animals, must have food and the ability to reproduce in order to survive, and in this program we observe how a number of sea animals have adapted to aquatic environments, allowing them to survive harmoniously with their environment and its inhabitants; also like land animals we learn about the importance of sea species to the overall balance of life on our planet.
Sea animals, like land animals, must have food and the ability to reproduce in order to survive, and in this program we observe how a number of sea animals have adapted to aquatic environments, allowing them to survive harmoniously with their environment and its inhabitants; also like land animals we learn about the importance of sea species to the overall balance of life on our planet.
Video
1 online resource (streaming video file)
Specifically designed for a high school/introductory college science course, this series explores key topics on human biology and the body and helps instructors to teach challenging concepts. The films are a great asset for teachers and teachers in training to use to integrate video into their lesson plans to capture the attention of students and enhance learning. The programs utilize digital videography and detailed animations to explain complicated concepts about the way the human body functions, and are accompanied by teacher's materials. The videos in the series include: Skin, Skeletal, and Muscular Systems, Exploring the Digestive and Excretory Systems, Investigating Circulation, Respiration, The Amazing Nervous System, Senses, Investigating the Immune System, Reproduction and Development, Essential Nutrition, and Maintaining a Healthy Body.
Specifically designed for a high school/introductory college science course, this series explores key topics on human biology and the body and helps instructors to teach challenging concepts. The films are a great asset for teachers and teachers in training to use to integrate video into their lesson plans to capture the attention of students and enhance learning. The programs utilize digital videography and detailed animations to explain complicated concepts about the way the human body functions, and are accompanied by teacher's materials. The videos in the series include: Skin, Skeletal, and Muscular Systems, Exploring the Digestive and Excretory Systems, Investigating Circulation, Respiration, The Amazing Nervous System, Senses, Investigating the Immune System, Reproduction and Development, Essential Nutrition, and Maintaining a Healthy Body.
Video
1 online resource (streaming video file)
Merit of Honor -Wildlife and Environment Competition Award-winning cinematographer Greg Hensley offers incredible footage of wildlife in their natural settings, underscoring not only the importance of their own survival, but also how important the preservation of nature and wildlife is to us all. American bald eagles inspire us to explore; we learn of orcas or killer whales; see wolves that have been reintroduced into Yellowstone National Park, where we too see bison, elk, great horned owls and prairie chickens; and in Alaska we learn about glaciers in Glacier National Park, as well as wildlife such as mountain goats, bears, eagles and salmon.
Merit of Honor -Wildlife and Environment Competition Award-winning cinematographer Greg Hensley offers incredible footage of wildlife in their natural settings, underscoring not only the importance of their own survival, but also how important the preservation of nature and wildlife is to us all. American bald eagles inspire us to explore; we learn of orcas or killer whales; see wolves that have been reintroduced into Yellowstone National Park, where we too see bison, elk, great horned owls and prairie chickens; and in Alaska we learn about glaciers in Glacier National Park, as well as wildlife such as mountain goats, bears, eagles and salmon.
Book
xv, p. : ill.
  • 1. Algorithmic systems biology. 1.1. Converging sciences. 1.2. The approach. 1.3. Structure of the book. 1.4. Summary. 1.5. Further reading
  • 2. Setting the context. 2.1. The structure of the cell. 2.2. DNA, RNA and genes. 2.3. Proteins. 2.4. Metabolites. 2.5. Cellular processes. 2.6. Experimental methods. 2.7. Summary. 2.8. Further reading
  • 3. Systems and models. 3.1. Systems. 3.2. Model. 3.3. Summary. 3.4. Further reading
  • 4. Static modeling technologies. 4.1. Preliminary assessment. 4.2. Linear regression. 4.3. Dimensionality reduction methods. 4.4. Clustering. 4.5. Gene set analysis. 4.6. Analysis of biological networks. 4.7. Summary. 4.8. Further reading
  • 5. Dynamic modeling technologies. 5.1. Equation-based approaches. 5.2. Rewriting systems. 5.3. Network-based approaches. 5.4. Automata-based approaches. 5.5. Relationship between continuous and stochastic models. 5.6. Diagrammatic modeling. 5.7. Summary. 5.8. Further reading
  • 6. Language-based modeling. 6.1. Process calculi. 6.2. Third generation: from calculi to modeling languages. 6.3. Self-assembly. 6.4. An evolutionary framework. 6.6. Summary. 6.7. Further reading
  • 7. Dynamic modeling process. 7.1. Setting the objectives and the acceptance criteria. 7.2. Building the knowledge base. 7.3. From the knowledge base to a model schema. 7.4. From the model schema to a concrete model. 7.5. Model calibration, evaluation and refinement. 7.6. Summary. 7.7. Further reading
  • 8. Simulation. 8.1. Model execution. 8.2. Random number generation. 8.3. Stochastic simulation algorithms. 8.4. Summary. 8.5. Further reading
  • 9. Perspectives and conclusions.
Modeling is fast becoming fundamental to understanding the processes that define biological systems.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • 1. Algorithmic systems biology. 1.1. Converging sciences. 1.2. The approach. 1.3. Structure of the book. 1.4. Summary. 1.5. Further reading
  • 2. Setting the context. 2.1. The structure of the cell. 2.2. DNA, RNA and genes. 2.3. Proteins. 2.4. Metabolites. 2.5. Cellular processes. 2.6. Experimental methods. 2.7. Summary. 2.8. Further reading
  • 3. Systems and models. 3.1. Systems. 3.2. Model. 3.3. Summary. 3.4. Further reading
  • 4. Static modeling technologies. 4.1. Preliminary assessment. 4.2. Linear regression. 4.3. Dimensionality reduction methods. 4.4. Clustering. 4.5. Gene set analysis. 4.6. Analysis of biological networks. 4.7. Summary. 4.8. Further reading
  • 5. Dynamic modeling technologies. 5.1. Equation-based approaches. 5.2. Rewriting systems. 5.3. Network-based approaches. 5.4. Automata-based approaches. 5.5. Relationship between continuous and stochastic models. 5.6. Diagrammatic modeling. 5.7. Summary. 5.8. Further reading
  • 6. Language-based modeling. 6.1. Process calculi. 6.2. Third generation: from calculi to modeling languages. 6.3. Self-assembly. 6.4. An evolutionary framework. 6.6. Summary. 6.7. Further reading
  • 7. Dynamic modeling process. 7.1. Setting the objectives and the acceptance criteria. 7.2. Building the knowledge base. 7.3. From the knowledge base to a model schema. 7.4. From the model schema to a concrete model. 7.5. Model calibration, evaluation and refinement. 7.6. Summary. 7.7. Further reading
  • 8. Simulation. 8.1. Model execution. 8.2. Random number generation. 8.3. Stochastic simulation algorithms. 8.4. Summary. 8.5. Further reading
  • 9. Perspectives and conclusions.
Modeling is fast becoming fundamental to understanding the processes that define biological systems.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
1 online resource.
The extracytoplasmic functioning sigma factor σE is known to play an essential role for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to survive and proliferate in macrophages and mice. However, its regulatory network is not well characterized, especially during infection. Here we used microarray to identify genes regulated by σE in Salmonella grown in three conditions: a nutrient-rich condition and two others that mimic early and late intracellular infection. We found that in each condition σE regulated different sets of genes, and notably, several global regulators. When comparing nutrient-rich and infection-like conditions, large changes were observed in the expression of genes involved in Salmonella pathogenesis island (SPI)-1 type-three secretion system (TTSS), SPI-2 TTSS, protein synthesis, and stress responses. In total, the expression of 58% of Salmonella genes was affected by σE in at least one of the three conditions. An important finding is that σE up-regulates SPI-2 genes, which are essential for Salmonella intracellular survival, by up-regulating SPI-2 activator ssrB expression at the early stage of infection and down-regulating SPI-2 repressor hns expression at a later stage. Moreover, σE is capable of countering the silencing of H-NS, releasing the expression of SPI-2 genes. This connection between σE and SPI-2 genes, combined with the global regulatory effect of σE, may account for the lethality of rpoE-deficient Salmonella in murine infection.
The extracytoplasmic functioning sigma factor σE is known to play an essential role for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to survive and proliferate in macrophages and mice. However, its regulatory network is not well characterized, especially during infection. Here we used microarray to identify genes regulated by σE in Salmonella grown in three conditions: a nutrient-rich condition and two others that mimic early and late intracellular infection. We found that in each condition σE regulated different sets of genes, and notably, several global regulators. When comparing nutrient-rich and infection-like conditions, large changes were observed in the expression of genes involved in Salmonella pathogenesis island (SPI)-1 type-three secretion system (TTSS), SPI-2 TTSS, protein synthesis, and stress responses. In total, the expression of 58% of Salmonella genes was affected by σE in at least one of the three conditions. An important finding is that σE up-regulates SPI-2 genes, which are essential for Salmonella intracellular survival, by up-regulating SPI-2 activator ssrB expression at the early stage of infection and down-regulating SPI-2 repressor hns expression at a later stage. Moreover, σE is capable of countering the silencing of H-NS, releasing the expression of SPI-2 genes. This connection between σE and SPI-2 genes, combined with the global regulatory effect of σE, may account for the lethality of rpoE-deficient Salmonella in murine infection.
Video
1 online resource (streaming video file)
Learn what happens when you or others are in a bad mood by exploring some theories about emotion; explore the role of facial expressions in emotional feedback; and change the way you think about tense arguments.
Learn what happens when you or others are in a bad mood by exploring some theories about emotion; explore the role of facial expressions in emotional feedback; and change the way you think about tense arguments.
Book
1 online resource (Article No. 39 ) : digital, PDF file.
In ancient Chinese philosophy, Yin-Yang describes two contrary forces that are interconnected and interdependent. This concept also holds true in microbial cell factories, where Yin represents energy metabolism in the form of ATP, and Yang represents carbon metabolism. Current biotechnology can effectively edit the microbial genome or introduce novel enzymes to redirect carbon fluxes. On the other hand, microbial metabolism loses significant free energy as heat when converting sugar into ATP; while maintenance energy expenditures further aggravate ATP shortage. The limitation of cell “powerhouse” prevents hosts from achieving high carbon yields and rates. Via an <i>Escherichia coli</i> flux balance analysis model, we further demonstrate the penalty of ATP cost on biofuel synthesis. To ensure cell powerhouse being sufficient in microbial cell factories, we propose five principles: 1. Take advantage of native pathways for product synthesis. 2. Pursue biosynthesis relying only on pathways or genetic parts without significant ATP burden. 3. Combine microbial production with chemical conversions (semi-biosynthesis) to reduce biosynthesis steps. 4. Create “minimal cells” or use non-model microbial hosts with higher energy fitness. 5. Develop a photosynthesis chassis that can utilize light energy and cheap carbon feedstocks. Meanwhile, metabolic flux analysis can be used to quantify both carbon and energy metabolisms. The fluxomics results are essential to evaluate the industrial potential of laboratory strains, avoiding false starts and dead ends during metabolic engineering
In ancient Chinese philosophy, Yin-Yang describes two contrary forces that are interconnected and interdependent. This concept also holds true in microbial cell factories, where Yin represents energy metabolism in the form of ATP, and Yang represents carbon metabolism. Current biotechnology can effectively edit the microbial genome or introduce novel enzymes to redirect carbon fluxes. On the other hand, microbial metabolism loses significant free energy as heat when converting sugar into ATP; while maintenance energy expenditures further aggravate ATP shortage. The limitation of cell “powerhouse” prevents hosts from achieving high carbon yields and rates. Via an <i>Escherichia coli</i> flux balance analysis model, we further demonstrate the penalty of ATP cost on biofuel synthesis. To ensure cell powerhouse being sufficient in microbial cell factories, we propose five principles: 1. Take advantage of native pathways for product synthesis. 2. Pursue biosynthesis relying only on pathways or genetic parts without significant ATP burden. 3. Combine microbial production with chemical conversions (semi-biosynthesis) to reduce biosynthesis steps. 4. Create “minimal cells” or use non-model microbial hosts with higher energy fitness. 5. Develop a photosynthesis chassis that can utilize light energy and cheap carbon feedstocks. Meanwhile, metabolic flux analysis can be used to quantify both carbon and energy metabolisms. The fluxomics results are essential to evaluate the industrial potential of laboratory strains, avoiding false starts and dead ends during metabolic engineering
Video
1 online resource (1 streaming video file (40 min.) : color, sound).
  • Contents: Patterns of genetic variation in Europe and the Neolithic
  • Ancient DNA and anatomically modern humans (Challenges & Potential)
  • The Neolithic transition in Europe (Scandinavia, Iberia and Eastern Europe).
  • Contents: Patterns of genetic variation in Europe and the Neolithic
  • Ancient DNA and anatomically modern humans (Challenges & Potential)
  • The Neolithic transition in Europe (Scandinavia, Iberia and Eastern Europe).
Video
1 online resource (streaming video file)
Visiting two great wilderness areas of the United States, Yellowstone National Park in Montana and the Rocky Mountains in Colorado, award-winning cinematographer Greg Hensley captures the fascinating behavior of animals in the natural world securing their defense, food, territory and mating rights. By observing their battles, we discover these confrontations are more of sport than a war, which strengthen the animals, their social ties and their species, an actual life lesson for humans. Across a backdrop of incredible natural beauty, the animals featured include grizzly bears, bighorn sheep, bison, osprey, and great blue herons.
Visiting two great wilderness areas of the United States, Yellowstone National Park in Montana and the Rocky Mountains in Colorado, award-winning cinematographer Greg Hensley captures the fascinating behavior of animals in the natural world securing their defense, food, territory and mating rights. By observing their battles, we discover these confrontations are more of sport than a war, which strengthen the animals, their social ties and their species, an actual life lesson for humans. Across a backdrop of incredible natural beauty, the animals featured include grizzly bears, bighorn sheep, bison, osprey, and great blue herons.
Video
1 online resource (streaming video file)
Interview with Jane Goodall, a primatologist, ethologist, anthropologist, and environmental advocate whose studies with chimpanzees in Tanzania have changed not only our understanding of chimpanzees but also our understanding of the nature of human beings. In 1977, she established the Jane Goodall Institute (JGI), which supports the Gombe research, and she is a global leader in the effort to protect chimpanzees and their habitats, and the environment more generally. With nineteen offices around the world, the JGI is widely recognized for innovative, community-centred conservation and development programs in Africa. Its global youth program, Roots and Shoots, was started in a meeting between Goodall and 16 local teenagers in Dar es Salaam. The organization now has more than 10,000 groups in 120 countries. Today she devotes virtually all of her time to advocacy on behalf of chimpanzees and the environment, travelling nearly 300 days a year.
Interview with Jane Goodall, a primatologist, ethologist, anthropologist, and environmental advocate whose studies with chimpanzees in Tanzania have changed not only our understanding of chimpanzees but also our understanding of the nature of human beings. In 1977, she established the Jane Goodall Institute (JGI), which supports the Gombe research, and she is a global leader in the effort to protect chimpanzees and their habitats, and the environment more generally. With nineteen offices around the world, the JGI is widely recognized for innovative, community-centred conservation and development programs in Africa. Its global youth program, Roots and Shoots, was started in a meeting between Goodall and 16 local teenagers in Dar es Salaam. The organization now has more than 10,000 groups in 120 countries. Today she devotes virtually all of her time to advocacy on behalf of chimpanzees and the environment, travelling nearly 300 days a year.
Book
53 p. ; 21 x 30 cm.
Climate support will be an important element in reaching a post-2020 climate agreement at COP 21 in December 2015. To further increase and mobilise the levels of climate support post-2020, a number of proposals have been made in the negotiating text produced in the Geneva session of the Ad-hoc Working Group on the Durban Platform of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in February 2015. This paper explores the advantages and disadvantages of several of these proposals, focusing on those that are clear and specific. The paper assesses proposals on mobilising climate finance using the following criteria: (i) the level of financial flows that they could generate; (ii) how much of this could be mobilised in the UNFCCC context; (iii) the ease of implementation of the proposal; (iv) if and how such increased mobilisation could be monitored; and (v) whether the proposal would fill a specific gap in the context of climate support within the UNFCCC. The paper undertakes a similar assessment for proposals in the Geneva text on enhancing the level of technology development and transfer, as well as capacity building. It discusses whether the proposals could potentially increase technology development and transfer, capacity building and development, as well as whether they are likely to do so in practice, based on current experience and ease of implementation. The proposals vary significantly in the amount of climate support they could mobilise (or enhance, in the case of technology and capacity building), for a range of reasons. These include the particular wording of the proposals, their sensitivity to national implementation, uncertainty in measuring progress towards objectives, and in some cases the limited role the UNFCCC plays as an institution in a given area of climate support.
Climate support will be an important element in reaching a post-2020 climate agreement at COP 21 in December 2015. To further increase and mobilise the levels of climate support post-2020, a number of proposals have been made in the negotiating text produced in the Geneva session of the Ad-hoc Working Group on the Durban Platform of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in February 2015. This paper explores the advantages and disadvantages of several of these proposals, focusing on those that are clear and specific. The paper assesses proposals on mobilising climate finance using the following criteria: (i) the level of financial flows that they could generate; (ii) how much of this could be mobilised in the UNFCCC context; (iii) the ease of implementation of the proposal; (iv) if and how such increased mobilisation could be monitored; and (v) whether the proposal would fill a specific gap in the context of climate support within the UNFCCC. The paper undertakes a similar assessment for proposals in the Geneva text on enhancing the level of technology development and transfer, as well as capacity building. It discusses whether the proposals could potentially increase technology development and transfer, capacity building and development, as well as whether they are likely to do so in practice, based on current experience and ease of implementation. The proposals vary significantly in the amount of climate support they could mobilise (or enhance, in the case of technology and capacity building), for a range of reasons. These include the particular wording of the proposals, their sensitivity to national implementation, uncertainty in measuring progress towards objectives, and in some cases the limited role the UNFCCC plays as an institution in a given area of climate support.
Book
1 online resource. Digital: text file; PDF.
  • Part I. Human Peripheral Nerve.- 1. Ultrastructure of Myelinated and Unmyelinated Axons.- 2. Macrophages, Mastocytes, and Plasma Cells.- 3. Ultrastructure of the Endoneurium.- 4. Ultrastructure of the Perineurium.- 5. Ultrastructure of the Epineurium .- 6. Origin of the Fascicles and Intraneural Plexus.- 7. Macroscopic View of the Cervical Plexus and Brachial Plexus.- 8. Anna Carrera, Francisco Reina.- 9. Macroscopic View of the Lumbar Plexus and Sacral Plexus.- 10. Cross-sectional Microscopic Anatomy of the Sciatic Nerve and its Dissected Branches.- 11. Cross-sectional Microscopic Anatomy of the Sciatic Nerve and Paraneural Sheaths.- 12. Computerized Tomographic Images of Unintentional Intraneural Injection.- 13. Ultrasound View of Unintentional Intraneural Injection.- 14. Histologic Features of Needle-Nerve and Intraneural Injection Injury as Seen on Light Microscopy.- 15. Structure of Nerve Lesions after "In Vitro" Punctures.- 16. Scanning Electron Microscopy View of In Vitro Intraneural Injections.- 17. Injection of Dye Inside the Paraneural Sheath of the Sciatic Nerve in the Popliteal Fossa.- 18. High-Definition and Three-Dimensional Volumetric Ultrasound Imaging of the Sciatic Nerve.- Part II. Component of the Spinal Canal.- 19. Spinal Dural Sac, Nerve Root Cuffs, Rootlets, and Nerve Roots.- 20. Ultrastructure of Spinal Dura Mater.- 21. Ultrastructure of the Spinal Arachnoid Layer.- 22. Three-Dimensional Reconstruction of Spinal Dural Sac.- 23. Three-dimensional Reconstruction of Spinal Epidural Fat.- 24. Ultrastructure of Human Spinal Trabecular Arachnoid.- 25. Ultrastructure of Spinal Pia Mater.- 26. Ultrastructure of Spinal Subdural Compartment: Origin of Spinal Subdural Space.- 27. Unintentional Subdural and Intradural Placement of Epidural Catheters.- 28. Ultrastructure of Human Spinal Nerve Roots.- 29. Three-dimensional Reconstruction of Cauda Equine Nerve Roots.- 30. Spinal Nerve Root Lesions after "In Vitro" Needle Puncture.- 31. Nerve Root Cuff Lesions after "In Vitro" Needle Puncture and Model of "In Vitro" Nerve Stimuli Caused by Epidural Catheters.- 32. Ligamentum Flavum and Related Spinal Ligaments.- 33. The Ligamentum Flavum.- 34. Subarachnoid (Intrathecal) Ligaments.- 35. Displacement of the Nerve Roots of Cauda Equina in Different Positions.- 36. Nerve Root and Types of Needles Used in Transforaminal Injections.- 37. Three-Dimensional Visualization of Spinal Cerebrospinal Fluid and Cauda Equina Nerve Roots, and Estimation of a Related Vulnerability Ratio.- 38. Ultrastructure of Nerve Root Cuffs: Dura-Epineurium Transition Tissue.- 39. Ultrastructure of Nerve Root Cuffs: Arachnoid Layer-Perineurium Transition Tissue at Preganglionic, Ganglionic, and Postganglionic Levels.- 40. Spinal Cord Stimulation.- 41. Ultrastructure of Dural Lesions Produced in Lumbar Punctures.- 42. Injections of Particulate Steroids for Nerve Root Blockade: Ultrastructural Examination of Complicating Factors.- 43. Nerve Root and Types of Needles Used in Transforaminal Injections.- Part III. Materials.- 44. Needles in Regional Anesthesia.- 45. Catheters in Regional Anesthesia.- 46. Epidural Filters and Particles from Surgical Gloves.- Part IV. Research Techniques.- 47. Three-dimensional Reconstruction of Spinal Cerebrospinal Fluid, Roots, and Surrounding Structures.- 48. Cerebrospinal Fluid and Root Volume Quantification from Magnetic Resonance Images.- 49. Scanning Electron Microscopy.- 50. Transmission Electron Microscopy.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This is the first atlas to depict in high-resolution images the fine structure of the spinal canal, the nervous plexuses, and the peripheral nerves in relation to clinical practice. The Atlas of Functional Anatomy for Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine contains more than 1500 images of unsurpassed quality, most of which have never been published, including scanning electron microscopy images of neuronal ultrastructures, macroscopic sectional anatomy, and three-dimensional images reconstructed from patient imaging studies. Each chapter begins with a short introduction on the covered subject but then allows the images to embody the rest of the work; detailed text accompanies figures to guide readers through anatomy, providing evidence-based, clinically relevant information. Beyond clinically relevant anatomy, the book features regional anesthesia equipment (needles, catheters, surgical gloves) and overview of some cutting edge research instruments (e.g. scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy). Of interest to regional anesthesiologists, interventional pain physicians, and surgeons, this compendium is meant to complement texts that do not have this type of graphic material in the subjects of regional anesthesia, interventional pain management, and surgical techniques of the spine or peripheral nerves.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Part I. Human Peripheral Nerve.- 1. Ultrastructure of Myelinated and Unmyelinated Axons.- 2. Macrophages, Mastocytes, and Plasma Cells.- 3. Ultrastructure of the Endoneurium.- 4. Ultrastructure of the Perineurium.- 5. Ultrastructure of the Epineurium .- 6. Origin of the Fascicles and Intraneural Plexus.- 7. Macroscopic View of the Cervical Plexus and Brachial Plexus.- 8. Anna Carrera, Francisco Reina.- 9. Macroscopic View of the Lumbar Plexus and Sacral Plexus.- 10. Cross-sectional Microscopic Anatomy of the Sciatic Nerve and its Dissected Branches.- 11. Cross-sectional Microscopic Anatomy of the Sciatic Nerve and Paraneural Sheaths.- 12. Computerized Tomographic Images of Unintentional Intraneural Injection.- 13. Ultrasound View of Unintentional Intraneural Injection.- 14. Histologic Features of Needle-Nerve and Intraneural Injection Injury as Seen on Light Microscopy.- 15. Structure of Nerve Lesions after "In Vitro" Punctures.- 16. Scanning Electron Microscopy View of In Vitro Intraneural Injections.- 17. Injection of Dye Inside the Paraneural Sheath of the Sciatic Nerve in the Popliteal Fossa.- 18. High-Definition and Three-Dimensional Volumetric Ultrasound Imaging of the Sciatic Nerve.- Part II. Component of the Spinal Canal.- 19. Spinal Dural Sac, Nerve Root Cuffs, Rootlets, and Nerve Roots.- 20. Ultrastructure of Spinal Dura Mater.- 21. Ultrastructure of the Spinal Arachnoid Layer.- 22. Three-Dimensional Reconstruction of Spinal Dural Sac.- 23. Three-dimensional Reconstruction of Spinal Epidural Fat.- 24. Ultrastructure of Human Spinal Trabecular Arachnoid.- 25. Ultrastructure of Spinal Pia Mater.- 26. Ultrastructure of Spinal Subdural Compartment: Origin of Spinal Subdural Space.- 27. Unintentional Subdural and Intradural Placement of Epidural Catheters.- 28. Ultrastructure of Human Spinal Nerve Roots.- 29. Three-dimensional Reconstruction of Cauda Equine Nerve Roots.- 30. Spinal Nerve Root Lesions after "In Vitro" Needle Puncture.- 31. Nerve Root Cuff Lesions after "In Vitro" Needle Puncture and Model of "In Vitro" Nerve Stimuli Caused by Epidural Catheters.- 32. Ligamentum Flavum and Related Spinal Ligaments.- 33. The Ligamentum Flavum.- 34. Subarachnoid (Intrathecal) Ligaments.- 35. Displacement of the Nerve Roots of Cauda Equina in Different Positions.- 36. Nerve Root and Types of Needles Used in Transforaminal Injections.- 37. Three-Dimensional Visualization of Spinal Cerebrospinal Fluid and Cauda Equina Nerve Roots, and Estimation of a Related Vulnerability Ratio.- 38. Ultrastructure of Nerve Root Cuffs: Dura-Epineurium Transition Tissue.- 39. Ultrastructure of Nerve Root Cuffs: Arachnoid Layer-Perineurium Transition Tissue at Preganglionic, Ganglionic, and Postganglionic Levels.- 40. Spinal Cord Stimulation.- 41. Ultrastructure of Dural Lesions Produced in Lumbar Punctures.- 42. Injections of Particulate Steroids for Nerve Root Blockade: Ultrastructural Examination of Complicating Factors.- 43. Nerve Root and Types of Needles Used in Transforaminal Injections.- Part III. Materials.- 44. Needles in Regional Anesthesia.- 45. Catheters in Regional Anesthesia.- 46. Epidural Filters and Particles from Surgical Gloves.- Part IV. Research Techniques.- 47. Three-dimensional Reconstruction of Spinal Cerebrospinal Fluid, Roots, and Surrounding Structures.- 48. Cerebrospinal Fluid and Root Volume Quantification from Magnetic Resonance Images.- 49. Scanning Electron Microscopy.- 50. Transmission Electron Microscopy.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This is the first atlas to depict in high-resolution images the fine structure of the spinal canal, the nervous plexuses, and the peripheral nerves in relation to clinical practice. The Atlas of Functional Anatomy for Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine contains more than 1500 images of unsurpassed quality, most of which have never been published, including scanning electron microscopy images of neuronal ultrastructures, macroscopic sectional anatomy, and three-dimensional images reconstructed from patient imaging studies. Each chapter begins with a short introduction on the covered subject but then allows the images to embody the rest of the work; detailed text accompanies figures to guide readers through anatomy, providing evidence-based, clinically relevant information. Beyond clinically relevant anatomy, the book features regional anesthesia equipment (needles, catheters, surgical gloves) and overview of some cutting edge research instruments (e.g. scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy). Of interest to regional anesthesiologists, interventional pain physicians, and surgeons, this compendium is meant to complement texts that do not have this type of graphic material in the subjects of regional anesthesia, interventional pain management, and surgical techniques of the spine or peripheral nerves.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
1 online resource (12064 ) : digital, PDF file.
Despite the known biochemical production of a range of aromatic compounds by plants and the presence of benzenoids in floral scents, the emissions of only a few benzenoid compounds have been reported from the biosphere to the atmosphere. Here, using evidence from measurements at aircraft, ecosystem, tree, branch and leaf scales, with complementary isotopic labeling experiments, we show that vegetation (leaves, flowers, and phytoplankton) emits a wide variety of benzenoid compounds to the atmosphere at substantial rates. Controlled environment experiments show that plants are able to alter their metabolism to produce and release many benzenoids under stress conditions. The functions of these compounds remain unclear but may be related to chemical communication and protection against stress. We estimate the total global secondary organic aerosol potential from biogenic benzenoids to be similar to that from anthropogenic benzenoids (~10 Tg y<sup>-1</sup>), pointing to the importance of these natural emissions in atmospheric physics and chemistry.
Despite the known biochemical production of a range of aromatic compounds by plants and the presence of benzenoids in floral scents, the emissions of only a few benzenoid compounds have been reported from the biosphere to the atmosphere. Here, using evidence from measurements at aircraft, ecosystem, tree, branch and leaf scales, with complementary isotopic labeling experiments, we show that vegetation (leaves, flowers, and phytoplankton) emits a wide variety of benzenoid compounds to the atmosphere at substantial rates. Controlled environment experiments show that plants are able to alter their metabolism to produce and release many benzenoids under stress conditions. The functions of these compounds remain unclear but may be related to chemical communication and protection against stress. We estimate the total global secondary organic aerosol potential from biogenic benzenoids to be similar to that from anthropogenic benzenoids (~10 Tg y<sup>-1</sup>), pointing to the importance of these natural emissions in atmospheric physics and chemistry.
Video
1 online resource (streaming video file)
Interview with Sir Tim Smit, the highly innovative and successful businessman who restored ruined and discarded landscapes to create two of the most popular, and arguably most imaginative, botanical gardens in the world. His most notable enterprise"”The Eden Project"”took a devastated china clay quarry in rural Cornwall, England and transformed it over a 15 year-period, and costing 144 million pounds sterling, into one of the wonders of the world. The enormous educational theme park is dedicated to exploring the complete dependence of human beings on plants. Its two biomes"”one housing the world's largest indoor rainforest and the other featuring Mediterranean flora such as olives and grapes"”contain thousands of plant species, many of them medicinal. In this Green Interview, Smit discusses The Eden Project, how it operates and how it can be a model "for how people can live with the grain of nature."
Interview with Sir Tim Smit, the highly innovative and successful businessman who restored ruined and discarded landscapes to create two of the most popular, and arguably most imaginative, botanical gardens in the world. His most notable enterprise"”The Eden Project"”took a devastated china clay quarry in rural Cornwall, England and transformed it over a 15 year-period, and costing 144 million pounds sterling, into one of the wonders of the world. The enormous educational theme park is dedicated to exploring the complete dependence of human beings on plants. Its two biomes"”one housing the world's largest indoor rainforest and the other featuring Mediterranean flora such as olives and grapes"”contain thousands of plant species, many of them medicinal. In this Green Interview, Smit discusses The Eden Project, how it operates and how it can be a model "for how people can live with the grain of nature."