%{search_type} search results

1,365 catalog results

RSS feed for this result
View results as:
Number of results to display per page
Book
xix, 428 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
Green Library
Book
viii, 247 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Evaluating American elections : are they working well? / Todd Donovan
  • Compulsory voting and the United States / Shane P. Singh
  • Race and the right to vote : the modern barrier of voter ID laws / Hannah Walker, Gabriel Sanchez, Stephen Nuno, and Matt Barreto
  • Provisional votes : an election reform to count more votes / Martha Kropf and Holly Whisman
  • One step forward, two steps back : the curious case of immigrant voting rights / Ron Hayduk
  • Changing how America votes for President / Caroline J. Tolbert and Kellen Gracey
  • Redistricting and representation : searching for "fairness" between the lines / Vladimir Kogan and Eric McGhee
  • Ranked choice voting : a different way of casting and counting votes / David C. Kimball and Joseph Anthony
  • The impact of electoral rules on minority representation / Jason P. Casellas and Kenicia Wright The Fair Representation Act for Congress / Rob Richie and Drew Spencer Penrose
  • What's rules got to do with it? : parties, reform, and selection in the presidential nomination process / Jason S. Byers and Jamie L. Carson
  • Signature requirements and ballot access for non-major party candidates / Barry C. Burden and Jordan Hsu
  • Third parties and the fight for electoral reform / Brian Brox
  • Campaign finance in U.S. Politics : an era without limits / Lonna Rae Atkeson and Wendy L. Hansen
  • When do election rules change? / Todd Donovan.
Democracy requires conversations about how its practice can be improved. This is an enduring theme in American politics, and demands for change in how we conduct elections are highly salient today. The crisis of the 2000 presidential election generated demands for changes in election rules, but the response was muted. After 2000, several states adopted photo ID laws, and other rules that made it more difficult to vote. The 2010 Citizens United decision heralded in deregulation of campaign finance. The Voting Rights Act was weakened by The Court in 2013. More recently, the unprecedented presidential election of 2016 generated accusations from the left and right that America's elections were 'a rigged system' of caucuses, conventions, and campaign finance desperately in need of reforms. Changing How America Votes is an edited volume comprised of 15 short substantive chapters on various specific reform topics that examine how electoral democracy in the United States is working, and how it might be improved. Editor Todd Donovan has written brief introductory and concluding chapters, and very brief introductions to the following three thematic sections that divide the readings accordingly: Voting and Participation: Changing Who Votes; Electoral Rules and Systems: Changing How We Vote; and Changing the Role of Parties and Money. In order to facilitate student learning and assist instructors' ability to use the book, this edited volume reads as a coherent text. The contributors, many of whom are accomplished scholars, or who write frequent blog posts and Op-Ed pieces, were asked to write as accessibly as possible for an undergraduate audience, and address many of the following topics: * Why is this issue important? * What would a proposed reform look like? * What are arguments in favor of the proposal? * Is there evidence it might make a difference, and what difference would it make? * Beyond the evidence, is it the right thing to do? List of contributors: Joseph Anthony, Lonna Rae Atkeson, Matt Barreto , Brian Brox, Barry C. Burden, Jason S. Byers, Jamie L. Carson, Jason P. Casellas, Kellen Gracey, Wendy L. Hansen, Ron Hayduk, Jordan Hsu, David C. Kimball, Vladimir Kogan, Martha Kropf, Eric McGhee, Stephen Nuno, Drew Spencer Penrose, Rob Richie, Gabriel Sanchez, Shane P. Singh, Caroline J. Tolbert, Hannah Walker, Holly Whisman, and Kenicia Wright.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781442276079 20170522
Law Library (Crown)
Book
viii, 247 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
  • Preface 1. Evaluating American Elections: Are They Working Well?, by Todd Donovan Part I: Voting and Participation: Changing Who Votes 2. Compulsory Voting and the United States, by Shane P. Singh 3. Race and the Right to Vote: The Modern Barrier of Voter ID Laws, by Hannah Walker, Gabriel Sanchez, Stephen Nuno, and Matt Barreto 4. Provisional Votes: An Election Reform to Count More Votes, by Martha Kropf and Holly Whisman 5. One Step Forward, Two Steps Back: The Curious Case of Immigrant Voting Rights, by Ron Hayduk Part II: Electoral Rules and Systems: Changing How We Vote 6. Changing How America Votes for President, by Caroline J. Tolbert and Kellen Gracey 7. Redistricting and Representation: Searching for "Fairness" between the Lines, by Vladimir Kogan and Eric McGhee 8. Ranked Choice Voting: A Different Way of Casting and Counting Votes, by David C. Kimball and Joseph Anthony 9. The Impact of Electoral Rules on Minority Representation, by Jason P. Casellas and Kenicia Wright 10. The Fair Representation Act for Congress, by Rob Richie and Drew Spencer Penrose Part III: Changing the Roles of Parties and Money 11. What's Rules Got to Do with It? Parties, Reform, and Selection in the Presidential Nomination Process, by Jason S. Byers and Jamie L. Carson 12. Signature Requirements and Ballot Access for Non-Major Party Candidates, by Barry C. Burden and Jordan Hsu 13. Third Parties and the Fight for Electoral Reform, by Brian Brox 14. Campaign Finance in U.S. Politics: An Era without Limits, by Lonna Rae Atkeson and Wendy L. Hansen 15. When Do Election Rules Change?, by Todd Donovan References Index Contributors.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781442276079 20170522
Democracy requires conversations about how its practice can be improved. This is an enduring theme in American politics, and demands for change in how we conduct elections are highly salient today. The crisis of the 2000 presidential election generated demands for changes in election rules, but the response was muted. After 2000, several states adopted photo ID laws, and other rules that made it more difficult to vote. The 2010 Citizens United decision heralded in deregulation of campaign finance. The Voting Rights Act was weakened by The Court in 2013. More recently, the unprecedented presidential election of 2016 generated accusations from the left and right that America's elections were 'a rigged system' of caucuses, conventions, and campaign finance desperately in need of reforms. Changing How America Votes is an edited volume comprised of 15 short substantive chapters on various specific reform topics that examine how electoral democracy in the United States is working, and how it might be improved. Editor Todd Donovan has written brief introductory and concluding chapters, and very brief introductions to the following three thematic sections that divide the readings accordingly: Voting and Participation: Changing Who Votes; Electoral Rules and Systems: Changing How We Vote; and Changing the Role of Parties and Money. In order to facilitate student learning and assist instructors' ability to use the book, this edited volume reads as a coherent text. The contributors, many of whom are accomplished scholars, or who write frequent blog posts and Op-Ed pieces, were asked to write as accessibly as possible for an undergraduate audience, and address many of the following topics: * Why is this issue important? * What would a proposed reform look like? * What are arguments in favor of the proposal? * Is there evidence it might make a difference, and what difference would it make? * Beyond the evidence, is it the right thing to do? List of contributors: Joseph Anthony, Lonna Rae Atkeson, Matt Barreto , Brian Brox, Barry C. Burden, Jason S. Byers, Jamie L. Carson, Jason P. Casellas, Kellen Gracey, Wendy L. Hansen, Ron Hayduk, Jordan Hsu, David C. Kimball, Vladimir Kogan, Martha Kropf, Eric McGhee, Stephen Nuno, Drew Spencer Penrose, Rob Richie, Gabriel Sanchez, Shane P. Singh, Caroline J. Tolbert, Hannah Walker, Holly Whisman, and Kenicia Wright.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781442276079 20170522
Green Library
Book
xv, 246 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Politics at home abroad : migrants and their home towns
  • Migration and subnational politics in Mexico : a framework for analysis
  • Engagement through the diaspora channel : collective remittances and the 3x1 program for migrants
  • When the road to the mayor's office crosses the border : political trajectories of migrant mayors in Oaxaca, Mexico
  • Biographies of emigrant politicization : migrant engagement in three Mexican states
  • A theory of migration and municipal politics
  • Migrants as agents of democratization? : a comparative analysis of sending community politics
  • A wave that didn't break?
Green Library
Book
xvi, 319 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
  • Introduction: Gender and electoral politics in the twenty-first century / Susan J. Carroll and Richard L. Fox
  • Presidential elections : gendered space and the case of 2016 / Georgia Duerst-Lahti and Madison Oakley
  • Disrupting masculine dominance? : women as presidential and vice presidential contenders / Kelly Dittmar
  • Voter participation and turnout : the political generational divide among women deepens / Susan A. MacManus
  • Voting choices : the significance of women voters and the gender gap / Susan J. Carroll
  • Trumpeando Latinas/os : race, gender, immigration, and the role of Latinas/os / Anna Sampaio
  • African American women and electoral politics : the core of the new American electorate / Wendy G. Smooth
  • Congressional elections : women's candidacies and the road to gender parity / Richard L. Fox
  • Political parties and women's organizations : bringing women into the electoral arena / Barbara Burrell
  • Gender and communication on the campaign trail : media coverage, advertising, and online outreach / Dianne Bystrom
  • Women's election to office in the fifty states : opportunities and challenges / Kira Sanbonmatsu.
The fourth edition of Gender and Elections offers a systematic, lively, multi-faceted account of the role of gender in the electoral process through the 2016 elections. This timely, yet enduring, volume strikes a balance between highlighting the most important development for women as voters and candidates in the 2016 elections and providing a more long-term, in-depth analysis of the ways in which gender has helped shape the contours and outcomes of electoral politics in the United States. Individual chapters demonstrate the importance of gender in understanding and interpreting presidential elections, presidential and vice-presidential candidacies, voter participation and turnout, voting choices, congressional elections, the political involvement of Latinas, the participation of African American women, the support of political parties and women's organizations, candidate communications with voters, and state elections. Without question, Gender and Elections is the most comprehensive, reliable, and trustworthy resource on the role of gender in electoral politics.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781108417518 20180409
Law Library (Crown)
Book
1 online resource : illustrations (black and white)
In Incremental Polarization, Justin Buchler fills critical gaps in our understanding of legislative polarization by crafting a unified spatial theory of legislative elections, parties, and roll call voting. He contends that we need to move beyond elections and factor in Congress members' behavior in roll call voting-where a different but related spatial continuum operates.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780190865580 20180604
Book
v, 195 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Voter preferences over bundles of roll call votes
  • The costs of incremental positioning
  • A unified spatial model of Congress
  • Polarization and solving the collective action problem
  • The collective action problem in practice
  • Extreme reversion points and party leadership from 2011 through 2016.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
287 pages ; 24 cm
Green Library
Book
xii, 179 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Chapter 1: Voting Barriers: The Obstacle Course of Electoral Participation Chapter 2: Sweating the Vote: Polling Place Stress as a Voting Barrier Chapter 3: Studying Polling Place Stress: An Experimental Approach Chapter 4: Can You Read Me? Ballot Access Complexity and Voter Behavior Chapter 5: Does a Placebo Ballot Lead to a Voting Headache? Provisional Ballots and Voter Behavior Chapter 6: The Waiting is the Hardest Part? Polling Place Wait Times and Voter Behavior Chapter 7: Are the Barriers Higher for Some Voters? The Conditional Effects of Polling Place Stressors Chapter 8: Dealing with Polling Place Stressors: Conclusions and Implications Appendix A: Subject Recruitment Appendix B: Pre-Test Survey Appendix C: Post-Test, Mock Election Ballot Appendix D: Measures, Coding, and Distribution of Responses Bibliography.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781498533522 20180403
The Resilient Voter: Stressful Polling Places and Voting Behavior provides a new perspective on the role voting barriers play, demonstrating that they not only discourage participation but also affect the quality of votes cast. Offering an interesting and unique approach to the study of voting barriers, Shauna Reilly and Stacy G. Ulbig investigate the possibility that complicated ballot language, provisional voting, and long polling place lines cause some voters to cast ballots in a manner contradictory to their preferences. Building on arguments that stressful polling place conditions subject citizens to stress that can prevent them from casting complete ballots or even choosing to vote at all, the authors ask whether those who endure polling place frustrations and persevere to cast a ballot might become so stressed by their experience that they are unable to mark their ballots in a manner consistent with their standing policy preferences. Using a creative experimental design, the authors examine the ways in which complex ballot language, registration difficulties, and long polling place lines affect voters' stress levels, and how such anxieties translate into the willingness to cast a complete ballot and the ability to vote in a manner conforming to previously expressed preferences. The authors demonstrate that even though most voters prove remarkably resilient in the face of some potentially stressful polling place barriers, they are not immune to all polling place conditions. Further, they illustrate that some segments of the electorate tend to be more vulnerable to polling place stressors than others and illustrate the ways in which the compound effects of multiple barriers can exert an even wider impact.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781498533522 20180403
Green Library
Book
vii, 161 pages : color illustrations ; 25 cm
  • Introduction
  • Political identity : meaning, measures, and evidence
  • Inspirational leaders, personal narrative, and youth identity
  • Political independence of youth
  • Brining it together : multivariate analysis
  • Conclusions.
This book examines the reasons why young people vote. Viewing political behavior through a psychological lens, this book uses psychological developmental models to test the theory of political identity development and explain how and why young people vote. Rather than studying why young people do not vote, as the majority of the literature does, the book discusses the mechanisms and purpose behind youth voting. Themes of the text include identifying how political identities develop in young people, how leaders can contribute to identity development, and how we can explain differences between young Independents who will vote and those who will not. The first chapter engages the reader with the background for each theoretical element of the book and develops the argument for the book as a whole. Three major substantive chapters discuss and test the theories of political identity development, political leadership as identity role models, and how we misunderstand political independence by not taking into account why young people might choose to identify as an Independent. The final chapter discusses implications for upcoming elections and how this research might better inform people and institutions interested in increasing youth turnout to reformulate their approach. An overarching discussion of identity and the political components of identity development, this book will be of interest to political scientists studying public opinion and voting behavior, campaigns and elections, and political psychology, as well as practitioners such as civic engagement and youth voting groups who wish to engage young people in the political process.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319696072 20180611
Law Library (Crown)
Book
x, 315 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Introduction
  • A theory of uncertainty in nonvoting
  • Measuring nonvoting
  • Campaign context, uncertainty, and nonvoting
  • Who are nonvoters?
  • Searching the past
  • The post-war period: 1946-1972
  • A period of government reassessment: 1974-1990
  • Information technology years: 1993-2012
  • The national campaign context in retrospect.
A diverse body of research exists to explain why eligible voters don't go to the polls on election day. Theories span from the psychological (nonvoters have limited emotional engagement with politics and therefore lack motivation), to the social (politics is inherently social and nonvoters have limited networks), and the personal (nonvoters tend to be young, less educated, poor, and highly mobile). Other scholars suggest that people don't vote because campaigns are uninspiring. This book poses a new theory: uncertainty about the national context at the time of the election. During times of national crisis, when uncertainty is high, citizens are motivated to sort through information about each candidate to figure out which would best mitigate their uncertainty. When external uncertainty is low, however, citizens spend less time learning about candidates and are equally unmotivated to vote. The American Nonvoter examines how uncertainty regarding changing economic conditions, dramatic national events, and U.S. international interventions influences people's decisions whether to vote or not. Using rigorous statistical tools and rich historical stories, Lyn Ragsdale and Jerrold G. Rusk test this theory on aggregate nonvoting patterns in the United States across presidential and midterm elections from 1920 to 2012. The authors also challenge the stereotype of nonvoters as poor, uneducated and apathetic. Instead, the book shows that nonvoters are, by and large, as politically knowledgeable as voters, but see no difference between candidates or view them negatively.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780190670702 20170814
Green Library
Book
x, 315 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Introduction
  • A theory of uncertainty in nonvoting
  • Measuring nonvoting
  • Campaign context, uncertainty, and nonvoting
  • Who are nonvoters?
  • Searching the past
  • The post-war period : 1946-1972
  • A period of government reassessment : 1974-1990
  • Information technology years : 1993-2012
  • The national campaign context in retrospect.
A diverse body of research exists to explain why eligible voters don't go to the polls on election day. Theories span from the psychological (nonvoters have limited emotional engagement with politics and therefore lack motivation), to the social (politics is inherently social and nonvoters have limited networks), and the personal (nonvoters tend to be young, less educated, poor, and highly mobile). Other scholars suggest that people don't vote because campaigns are uninspiring. This book poses a new theory: uncertainty about the national context at the time of the election. During times of national crisis, when uncertainty is high, citizens are motivated to sort through information about each candidate to figure out which would best mitigate their uncertainty. When external uncertainty is low, however, citizens spend less time learning about candidates and are equally unmotivated to vote. The American Nonvoter examines how uncertainty regarding changing economic conditions, dramatic national events, and U.S. international interventions influences people's decisions whether to vote or not. Using rigorous statistical tools and rich historical stories, Lyn Ragsdale and Jerrold G. Rusk test this theory on aggregate nonvoting patterns in the United States across presidential and midterm elections from 1920 to 2012. The authors also challenge the stereotype of nonvoters as poor, uneducated and apathetic. Instead, the book shows that nonvoters are, by and large, as politically knowledgeable as voters, but see no difference between candidates or view them negatively.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780190670702 20171002
Law Library (Crown)
Book
x, 264 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Contents and AbstractsIntroduction: Explaining the Puzzling Evolution of the Voting Rights Act chapter abstractThis chapter lays out the main arguments of the book. It contends that the divergent trajectories of legislation, administration, and judicial interpretation in voting rights policy making derive largely from efforts by conservative politicians to narrow the scope of federal enforcement while at the same time preserving their public reputation of support for racial equality and minority voting rights. Conservatives reconciled these conflicting imperatives by adopting a strategy in which they would acquiesce to expansive voting rights protections in Congress, where decisions were highly visible, easily traceable, and open to contestation by civil rights activists, but at the same time work to narrow the scope of federal enforcement via administrative maneuvers and judicial appointments, where choices were less visible, harder to trace, and less open to political challenge. 1Liberal Ascendance and Enactment of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 chapter abstractThis chapter provides a history and explanation of the enactment of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, focusing on three factors that provide key explanatory leverage: rising frustration with the poor performance of existing voting rights protections, emergence of a powerful civil rights movement capable of dramatizing voting rights abuses and pressuring members of Congress and the president, and ascendance of a dominant liberal coalition capable of driving effective voting rights legislation through Congress. Early implementation and judicial interpretation of the statute are also discussed, with a focus on how these dynamics introduced new tensions in the Act that could not have been anticipated at the time of its enactment. 2Conservative Backlash and Partisan Struggle over Voting Rights, 1968-1980 chapter abstractThis chapter shows that Richard Nixon pioneered the strategy that would become central to Republican activity in relation to voting rights issues. Although Nixon desired to limit the scope of voting rights enforcement for both ideological and constituency reasons, in the end great anxiety about the negative electoral repercussions of weakening the VRA through legislation led him to acquiesce to an expansive reauthorization of the Act. At the same time, though, Nixon used administrative maneuvers and judicial appointments to check the scope of federal enforcement and thereby serve both ideological goals and core constituency demands. Because of his actions, the text, administrative enforcement, and judicial interpretation of the Act began to move in very different directions. 3The Growing Struggle over Voting Rights in the 1980s and 1990s chapter abstractThis chapter explains the growing gulf between the expansive text, increasingly fragmented administration, and increasingly conservative judicial interpretation of the VRA. This development is attributable to efforts by the Reagan administration (and, to a lesser extent, the George H. W. Bush administration) to simultaneously limit the scope of federal voting rights enforcement and maintain the appearance of support for the norm of racial equality. The president and his congressional allies acquiesced to an expansive reauthorization of the Act so as to avoid alienating people of color and moderate whites going into the 1982 elections. Yet, at the same time, conservatives within the Reagan administration deliberately pursued an administrative strategy to limit the scope of federal enforcement. Reagan also selected jurists for positions on the Supreme Court who were expected to pursue his vision of a "limited Constitution" in which the Court closely policed federal efforts to expand minority voting rights. 4Voting Rights Politics in an Era of Conservative Ascendance, 2001-2013 chapter abstractThe George W. Bush administration deliberately politicized voting rights administration, using unscrupulous methods to discipline and muzzle dissident staff, promote ideologically congruous attorneys, and enshrine conservative decisions in law. Additionally, Bush deliberately selected jurists with extremely narrow views of voting rights law for positions on the Supreme Court, ensuring that the Court would move further down the conservative path it had traversed since the Nixon administration. Yet, at the same time, the administration endorsed a sweeping reauthorization of the VRA that expanded legislative guarantees and reauthorized key provisions for a twenty-five-year period. The discrepancies between Republicans' administrative/judicial actions and their legislative behaviors were attributable to the varying visibility, traceability, and accessibility of politics in these different venues. 5Voting Rights Politics in the Age of Obama, 2009-2016 chapter abstractThis chapter highlights the impact of the Shelby County decision on the patterning of voting rights policy making, revealing how the decision altered the political playing field to the advantage of Republican opponents of muscular federal voting rights enforcement. With its ruling in Shelby County, the conservative justices on the Supreme Court swept aside the provision Republicans most vigorously opposed. This new state of affairs relieved Republicans of the politically fraught burden of justifying departures from existing voting rights law and allowed them to exploit their majority status in Congress to obstruct "divisive" legislation proposed by Democrats. For their part, given the infeasibility of reestablishing preclearance in a Congress in which Republicans controlled the House of Representatives-and, after 2014, the Senate as well-Democrats made the strategic choice to highlight Republican intransigence as a campaign issue in order to rally support among African American and Latino constituents. Conclusion: Partisan Interests, Institutional Conflict, and the Future of the Voting Rights Struggle chapter abstractThis chapter reviews the evidence, draws conclusions, and lays out some preliminary thoughts about the likely future of the voting rights struggle. Ultimately, it suggests, the right to vote is vulnerable, and its defense depends on affirmative efforts by civil rights activists, progressives, and their elected allies at all levels of government.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781503603516 20171002
Voting rights are a perennial topic in American politics. Recent elections and the Supreme Court's decision in Shelby County v. Holder, which struck down key enforcement provisions in the Voting Rights Act (VRA), have only placed further emphasis on the debate over voter disenfranchaisement. Over the past five decades, both Democrats and Republicans in Congress have consistently voted to expand the protections offered to vulnerable voters by the Voting Rights Act. And yet, the administration of the VRA has become more fragmented and judicial interpretation of its terms has become much less generous. Why have Republicans consistently adopted administrative and judicial decisions that undermine legislation they repeatedly endorse? Ballot Blocked shows how the divergent trajectories of legislation, administration, and judicial interpretation in voting rights policymaking derive largely from efforts by conservative politicians to narrow the scope of federal enforcement while at the same time preserving their public reputations as supporters of racial equality and minority voting rights. Jesse H. Rhodes argues that conservatives adopt a paradoxical strategy in which they acquiesce to expansive voting rights protections in Congress (where decisions are visible and easily traceable) while simultaneously narrowing the scope of federal enforcement via administrative and judicial maneuvers (which are less visible and harder to trace). Over time, the repeated execution of this strategy has enabled a conservative Supreme Court to exercise preponderant influence over the scope of federal enforcement.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781503603516 20171002
Green Library
Book
x, 264 pages : illustration ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction: Explaining the puzzling evolution of the Voting Rights Act
  • Liberal ascendance and enactment of the Voting Rights Act of 1965
  • Conservative backlash and partisan struggle over voting rights, 1968-1980
  • The growing struggle over voting rights in the 1980s and 1990s
  • Voting rights politics in an era of conservative ascendance, 2001-2013
  • Voting rights politics in the age of Obama, 2009-2016
  • Conclusion: Partisan interests, institutional conflict, and the future of the voting rights struggle.
Voting rights are a perennial topic in American politics. Recent elections and the Supreme Court's decision in Shelby County v. Holder, which struck down key enforcement provisions in the Voting Rights Act (VRA), have only placed further emphasis on the debate over voter disenfranchaisement. Over the past five decades, both Democrats and Republicans in Congress have consistently voted to expand the protections offered to vulnerable voters by the Voting Rights Act. And yet, the administration of the VRA has become more fragmented and judicial interpretation of its terms has become much less generous. Why have Republicans consistently adopted administrative and judicial decisions that undermine legislation they repeatedly endorse? Ballot Blocked shows how the divergent trajectories of legislation, administration, and judicial interpretation in voting rights policymaking derive largely from efforts by conservative politicians to narrow the scope of federal enforcement while at the same time preserving their public reputations as supporters of racial equality and minority voting rights. Jesse H. Rhodes argues that conservatives adopt a paradoxical strategy in which they acquiesce to expansive voting rights protections in Congress (where decisions are visible and easily traceable) while simultaneously narrowing the scope of federal enforcement via administrative and judicial maneuvers (which are less visible and harder to trace). Over time, the repeated execution of this strategy has enabled a conservative Supreme Court to exercise preponderant influence over the scope of federal enforcement.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781503603516 20171002
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xv, 228 pages ; 24 cm
  • Introduction
  • Candidates, voting choice and election outcomes
  • Design and data : district informants and the study of congressional elections
  • Polarization in congressional elections since 1952
  • Ideological proximity, valence, and voter choice
  • Correct voting on proximity and valence
  • Anticipated reactions and challenger entry
  • The proximity and valence rules in district voting
  • District ideological representation
  • Getting it right? : valence and ideology in district representation
  • Conclusion.
Candidates and Voters extends our understanding of voting, elections, and representation by elaborating a simple theory of voting choice based on voters' interest in policy and in the suitability of candidates to hold elective office ('leadership valence'). Voters' choices must be understood in the context of the choices between opposing candidates they are offered on these two dimensions. Drawing on extensive analysis of US House races, Stone shows that although voters lack the information that many analysts assume they need to function in a democracy, they are most often able to choose the better candidate on the policy and valence dimensions. In addition, candidates, when they decide whether and how to run, anticipate the interests that drive voters. The book shows that elections tend to produce outcomes on policy and leadership valence consistent with voters' interests, and challenges skeptical views of how well the electoral process works.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781316649602 20171023
Law Library (Crown)
Book
x, 207 pages ; 24 cm
  • Chapter 1: Sowing the Seeds of Civic Failure Chapter 2: A Primer on Republican Democracy Chapter 3: Taking the Parties Out Chapter 4: The Effects of Partisan Decline Chapter 5: The Semi-Sovereign Media Chapter 6: The State of the American Voter Chapter 7: The Dream and the Nightmare of Term Limits Chapter 8: The Promise and the Despair of Campaign Finance Reform Chapter 9: Leading By Following, or The Unreasonable Expectations on the Political Class Chapter 10: Look Forward, Angel Chapter 11: A Pathway to American Revival.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781498514194 20170213
The greatest threat to American democracy is the voting public. Candidates for political office, organized interests, and political parties are often blamed for the ills of American democracy, but this book places the focus on the core issue in American politics: a disengaged, demanding, and often contradictory voting public. Structural reforms such as the direct primary, term limits, and campaign finance regime reforms make the problems worse rather than better because these structural reforms fail to address core issues that disengage the voting public from republican politics.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781498514194 20170213
Green Library
Book
63 pages ; 24 cm.
Green Library

Articles+

Journal articles, e-books, & other e-resources
Articles+ results include