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Book
[76] p., [6] plates : maps
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14. A Complete account of the ceremonies observed in the coronations of the Kings and Queens of England. [electronic resource] : Containing, I. The form of the royal letters of summons, sent to the peers and peeresses, to attend the solemnity of the coronation. II. The usual disposition of the horse and foot-guards, and their respective habits, parades, and stations on the coronation day. III. The apparelling and robing of the King and Queen, and their majesties repairing to Westminster-Hall. IV. The marshalling and conducting into Westminster-Hall, the several persons who are to march in the procession. V. Their majesties entring the said hall, and the ceremony of presenting the regalia, &c. to the King. VI. The grand proceeding to the coronation, with the usual seating and placing of the several persons after their entrance into the church. VII. The usual ceremony of the coronations as performed in the church. VIII. The manner of their majesties return to Westminster-Hall. IX. The ceremony of the champion's challenge, and of the Heralds proclaiming the King's style in Latin, French, and English. X. A description of the royal and sacred ornaments, and of the crowns and scepters, &c. wherewith their majesties are crowned and invested; together with a brief history of the ancient chair, called St. Edward's chair, in which the King is crowned. XI. The ceremony of the proceedings at the coronations of King William and Queen Mary, of Queen Anne, and of His late Majesty King George I. By comparing which with the proceeding, history, the reader will be able to form a complete idea of the ceremonies which will be observed at the coronation of his present Majesty King George II. and his Royal Consort Queen Caroline. XII. A complete list of the lords spiritual and temporal, the knights of the most noble order of the Garter, and of the knights of the Bath; whereby the reader will have, at one view, most of the names of the illustrious persons who will have place in the grand solemnity of the coronation of their present majesties. XIII. A bill of fare at a former coronation-feast. With many other notable particulars, for which the reader is referred to the index. The whole adorn'd with curious cuts, representing on a copper-plate the manner of the champion's challenge, as also the imperial crowns, scepters, orb, Queen's circlet, the two pointed swords, and curtana, the Kings and Queen's rings, St. Edward's chair, &c. To which is also prefix'd very large and curious copper-plate, exhibiting (in that of King William and Queen Mary) the magnificent form of the procession usually observed in the coronation of the Kings and Queens of England [1727]

Book
[4], 67[i.e.76]p., plates : ill. ; 4⁰.
find.galegroup.com Eighteenth Century Collections Online

15. A complete account of the ceremonies observed in the coronations of the kings and queens of England. [electronic resource] : Containing, I. The form of the royal letters of summons, sent to the Peers and Peeresses, to attend the Solemnity of the Coronation. II. The usual Disposition of the Horse and Foot-Guards, and their respective. Habits, Parades, and Stations on the Coronation-Day. III. The Apparelling and Robing of the King and Queen, and their Majesties repairing to Westminster-Hall. IV. The Marshalling and Conducting into Westminster-Hall, the several Persons who are to march in the Procession. V. Their Majesties Entring the said Hall, and the Ceremony of presenting the Regalia, &c. to the King. VI. The Grand Proceeding to the Coronation, with the usual Seating and Placing of the several Persons after their Entrance into the Church. Vii. The usual Ceremony of the Coronations as performed in the Church. Viii. The Manner of their Majesties Return to Westminster-Hall. IX. The Ceremony of the Champion's Challenge, and of the Heralds proclaiming the King's Style in Latin, French, and English. X. A Description of the Royal and Sacred Ornaments, and of the Crowns and Scepters, &c. wherewith their Majesties are crowned, and invested; together with a brief History of the Ancient Chair, called St. Edward's-Chair, in which the King is crowned. XI. The Ceremony of the Proceedings at the Coronation of King William and Queen Mary, of Queen Anne, and of his late Majesty King George I. By comparing which with the preceding History, the Reader will be able to form a complete Idea of the Ceremonies which will be observed at the Coronation of His present Majesty King George II and his Royal Consort Queen Caroline. XII. A complete List of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, the Knights of the Most Noble Order of the Garter, and of the Knights of the Bath; Whereby the Reader will have, at one View, most of the Names of the illustrious Persons who will have Place in the Grand Solemnity of the Coronation of Their Present Majesties. XIII. A bill of fare at a former coronation-feast. With many other notable particulars, for which the Reader is referred to the Index. The whole adorn'd with curious cuts, representing on a Copper-Plate the Manner of the Champion's Challenge, as also the Imperial Crowns, Scepters, Orb, Queen's Circler, the two pointed Swords, and Curtana, the King's and Queen's Rings, St. Edward's Chair, &c. To which is also prefix'd a very large and curious Copper-Plate, exhibiting (in that of King William and Queen Mary) the magnificent Form of the Procession usually observed in the Coronation of the Kings and Queens of England [1727]

Book
80p., plates : ill. ; 4⁰.
find.galegroup.com Eighteenth Century Collections Online

16. A complete account of the ceremonies observed in the coronations of the kings and queens of England. [electronic resource] : Containing, I. The Form of the Royal Letters of Summons, sent to the Peers and Peeresses, to attend the Solemnity of the Coronation. II. The usual Disposition of the Horse and Foot-Guards, and their respective Habits, Parades, and Stations on the Coronation-Day. III. The Apparelling and Robing of the King and Queen, and their Majesties repairing to Westminster-Hall. IV. The Marshalling and Conducting into Westminster-Hall, the several Persons who are to march in the Procession. V. Their Majesties Entring the said Hall, and the Ceremony of presenting the Regalia, &c. to the King. VI. The Grand Proceeding to the Coronation, with the usual Seating and Placing of the several Persons after their Entrance into the Church. Vii. The usual Ceremony of the Coronations as performed in the Church. Viii. The Manner of their Majesties Return to Westminster-Hall. IX. The Ceremony of the Champion's Challenge, and of the Heralds proclaiming the King's Style in Latin, French, and English. X. A Description of the Royal and Sacred Ornaments, and of the Crowns and Scepters, &c. wherewith their Majesties are crowned and invested; together with a brief History of the Ancient Chair, called St. Edward's-Chair, in which the King is crowned. XI The Ceremony of the Proceedings at the Coronations of King William and Queen Mary, of Queen Anne, and of his late Majesty King George I. By comparing which with the preceding History, the Reader will be able to form a complete Idea of the Ceremonies which will be observed at the Coronation of His present Majesty King George II. and his Royal Consort Queen Caroline. XII. A complete List of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, the Knights of the Most Noble Order of the Garter, and of the Knights of the Bath; Whereby the Reader will have, at one View, most of the Names of the illustrious Persons who will have Place in the Grand Solemnity of the Coronation of Their Present Majesties. XIII. A Bill of Fare at a former Coronation-Feast. With many other Notable Particulars, for which the Reader is referred to the Index. The whole Adorn'd with Curious Cuts, representing on a Copper-Plate the Manner of the Champion's Challenge, as also the Imperial Crowns, Scepters, Orb, Queen's Circles, the two pointed Swords, and Curtana, the King's and Queen's Rings, St. Edward's Chair, &c. To which is also prefix'd a very large and curious Copper-Plate, exhibiting (in that of King William and Queen Mary) the magnificent Form of the Procession usually observed in the Coronation of the Kings and Queens of England [1727]

Book
[4], 67[i.e.76]p., plates ; 4⁰.
find.galegroup.com Eighteenth Century Collections Online
Book
1 sheet ; 1/8⁰.
find.galegroup.com Eighteenth Century Collections Online

19. The proceedings of the sessions of Oyer and Terminer, and the General Goal Delivery, held at Kingston-upon-Thames, for the county of Surrey; Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, and Saturday the 22d, 23d, 24th, and 25th of August; in the thirteenth year of His present Majesty's reign, and in the year of our Lord 1739. [electronic resource] : Before the Right Honourable Sir William Lee, Knt. Lord Chief Justice of His Majesty's Court of King's-Bench; Right Honourable Sir John Comyns, Knt. Lord Chief Baron of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; and the rest of His Majesty's Justices assigned to deliver the said gaol of the prisoners therein being. Containing the trials (at large) of all the prisoners, especially those who received sentence of death, viz. I. Noah Gooby, for robbing Mr. Deacon in Kennington-Lane, of a silver watch, a gold ring, a pair of silver shoe and knee buckles, and six shillings in money. 2. Norris Hodson, for robbing the Lady Catherine Forbes, of a silver patch-box, on Putney-Common. 3. John Hannah, (evidence against Captain Longdon) for robbing James Howard on the highway, between Kingston and Dition, of a a Guinea, and a linnen bag. 4. Michael Lucas, otherwise Stanley, for taking out of the house of John Parnell, two gold rings, and money to the value of 5l. 5. 6, 7, Peter Willington, Johanna Rashford Sambo, and Eleanor Spencer, for robbing Stephen Freeman, (an---famous pegg-maker in the mint) of a watch, a pair of shoe and knee buckles; and, 8. John Hollings for stealing a horse, a bag, part of a leaden pump, and iron work, out of the field and garden of Josiah Wordsworth, Esq; at Croydon, in Surry. Likewise, a particular account of Hugh Randall, father-in-law to, and concerned in the above robbery with, hollings, who kill'd himself in the Stock-house at Kingston, before trial, and the reasons that induced him to make this attempt on his life. Also the trial of William Prestage, for murder; and above twenty other very remarkable trials [1739]

Book
20p. ; 2⁰.
find.galegroup.com Eighteenth Century Collections Online

20. Proceedings of the sessions of Oyer and Terminer and General Goal Delivery [electronic resource] : held in Kingston-upon-Thames for the county of Surrey, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday the 22d, 23d, 24th and 25th of August, in the thirteenth year of his present Majesty's reign and in the year of our lord 1739 : before the Right Honourable Sir William Lee, knt., Lord Chief Justice of His Majesty's Court of King's-Bench, the Right Honourable Sir John Comyns, knt., Lord Chief Baron His Majesty's Court of Exchequer, and the rest of His Majesty's justices assigned to deliver the said Gaol of the prisoners therein being : containing the trial (at large) of all the prisoners, especially those who received sentence death, viz. 1. Noah Gooby for robbing Mr. Deacon in Kennington Lane, of a silver watch, a gold ring, a pair of silver shoe and knee buckles and six shillings in money. 2. Norris Hodson, for robbing the Lady Catherine Forbes, or a silver patch-box, on putney-common. 3. John Hannah, (evidence against Captain Longdon) for robbing Jame Haward on the highway between Kingston and Dixton, of a Guinea, and a linnen bag. 4. Michael Luca, otherswise Standley, fot taking out of the house of John Parnell two gold rings, and money to the value of 5l. 5,6,7. Peter Willington, Johanna Rashford Sambo, and Eleanor Spencer for robbing Stephen Freeman, (an ---famous pegg-maker in the mint of a watch, a pair of shoe and knee buckles and 8. John Hollings for stealing a horse, a bag, part of a leaden pump, and iron work, out of the field and garden of Josiah Wordsworth, Esq., at Croydon, in Surry : likewise, a particular account of Hugh Randall, father-in-law to, and concerned in the above robbery with, Hollings, who kill'd himself in the stock-house at Kingston before trial and the reasons that induced him to make this attempt on his life : also the trial of William Prestage, for manslaughter and above twenty other very remarkable trials [1749]

Book
18, [2] p.
galenet.galegroup.com Making of Modern Law. Trials, 1600-1926 For assistance ask at the Stanford Law Library reference desk.
Law Library (Crown)

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