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Book
x, 197 pages ; 23 cm.
  • Introduction to student rights
  • The special characteristics of schools
  • Student speech rights
  • Rights to religious expression
  • Privacy and surveillance
  • How to think about student rights.
What rights should students expect to exercise in public schools? Should bible study meetings be allowed during free periods? Should students be allowed to wear t-shirts that exhort taking drugs or committing violent acts? Should students be required to participate in drug testing? In this concisely argued book, Bryan Warnick examines how student rights in three areasfree speech, privacy, and religious expressionhave been addressed in policy, ethics, and the law. Starting with the Tinker decision, a landmark 1969 U.S. Supreme Court ruling which declared that students in public schools had constitutional rights that must be understood in light of special characteristics of the school environment, Warnick develops an education criterion that schools can use when facing difficult questions of student rights. Both probing and practical, Warnick explains how student rights can be properly understood and protected.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780807753798 20160615
Education Library (Cubberley)
Book
ix, 167 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • The problems of imitation and human exemplarity
  • The historical tradition of human exemplarity
  • How do people become examples?
  • How do examples bring out imitation?
  • The social meanings of imitation
  • Imitation, exemplarity, and moral reason
  • How can we evaluate human exemplars?
  • A social analysis of exemplarity and imitation.
Education Library (Cubberley)

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