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Book
x, 291 pages ; 25 cm
  • Nothing that boy did
  • Boots on the porch
  • Growing up black in Chicago
  • Emmett in Chicago and "Little Mississippi"
  • Pistol-whipping at Christmas
  • The incident
  • On the third day
  • Mama made the earth tremble
  • Warring regiments of Mississippi
  • Black Monday
  • People we don't need around here any more
  • Fixed opinions
  • Mississippi underground
  • "There he is"
  • Every last Anglo-Saxon one of you
  • The verdict of the world
  • Protest politics
  • Killing Emmett Till
  • Epilogue: the children of Emmett Till.
In 2014, protesters ringed the White House, chanting, "How many black kids will you kill? Michael Brown, Emmett Till!" Why did demonstrators invoke the name of a black boy murdered six decades before?In 1955, white men in the Mississippi Delta lynched a fourteen-year-old from Chicago named Emmett Till. His murder was part of a wave of white terrorism in the wake of the 1954 Supreme Court decision that declared public school segregation unconstitutional. The national coalition organized to protest the Till lynching became the foundation of the modern civil rights movement. Only weeks later, Rosa Parks thought about young Emmett as she refused to move to the back of a city bus in Montgomery, Alabama. Five years later, the Emmett Till generation, forever marked by the vicious killing of a boy their own age, launched sit-in campaigns that turned the struggle into a mass movement. "I can hear the blood of Emmett Till as it calls from the ground, " shouted a black preacher in Albany, Georgia. But what actually happened to Emmett Till-not the icon of injustice but the flesh-and-blood boy? Part detective story, part political history, Timothy Tyson's The Blood of Emmett Till draws on a wealth of new evidence, including the only interview ever given by Carolyn Bryant, the white woman in whose name Till was killed. Tyson's gripping narrative upends what we thought we knew about the most notorious racial crime in American history.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781476714868 20170306
Green Library
Book
x, 291 pages ; 25 cm
  • Nothing that boy did
  • Boots on the porch
  • Growing up black in Chicago
  • Emmett in Chicago and "Little Mississippi"
  • Pistol-whipping at Christmas
  • The incident
  • On the third day
  • Mama made the earth tremble
  • Warring regiments of Mississippi
  • Black Monday
  • People we don't need around here any more
  • Fixed opinions
  • Mississippi underground
  • "There he is"
  • Every last Anglo-Saxon one of you
  • The verdict of the world
  • Protest politics
  • Killing Emmett Till
  • Epilogue: The children of Emmett Till.
In 2014, protesters ringed the White House, chanting, "How many black kids will you kill? Michael Brown, Emmett Till!" Why did demonstrators invoke the name of a black boy murdered six decades before? In 1955, white men in the Mississippi Delta lynched a fourteen-year-old from Chicago named Emmett Till. His murder was part of a wave of white terrorism in the wake of the 1954 Supreme Court decision that declared public school segregation unconstitutional. The national coalition organized to protest the Till lynching became the foundation of the modern civil rights movement. Only weeks later, Rosa Parks thought about young Emmett as she refused to move to the back of a city bus in Montgomery, Alabama. Five years later, the Emmett Till generation, forever marked by the vicious killing of a boy their own age, launched sit-in campaigns that turned the struggle into a mass movement. "I can hear the blood of Emmett Till as it calls from the ground, " shouted a black preacher in Albany, Georgia. But what actually happened to Emmett Till-not the icon of injustice but the flesh-and-blood boy? Part detective story, part political history, Timothy Tyson's The Blood of Emmett Till draws on a wealth of new evidence, including the only interview ever given by Carolyn Bryant, the white woman in whose name Till was killed. Tyson's gripping narrative upends what we thought we knew about the most notorious racial crime in American history.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781476714844 20170424
Law Library (Crown)
Book
vii, 355 p. ; 25 cm.
Green Library
Book
402 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
The story of Robert F. Williams, an influential and controversial black rights activist of the generation that toppled Jim Crow and altered American history. Former President of the Munroe branch of the NAACP, Williams was forced to flee to Cuba, where he broadcast "Radio Free Dixie".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780807825020 20160528
Green Library
Book
xxii, 318 leaves ; 29 cm.
Green Library
Book
xvi, 301 p. ; 25 cm.
This study draws together scholarship on the Wilmington Race Riot of 1898 and its aftermath. Contributors hope to draw attention to the tragedy, to honour its victims, and to bring a clear historical voice to the debate over its legacy.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780807824511 20160528
Green Library

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